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Ten years of preanalytical monitoring and control: Synthetic Balanced Score Card Indicator.

Salinas M, López-Garrigós M, Flores E, Santo-Quiles A, Gutierrez M, Lugo J, Lillo R, Leiva-Salinas C - Biochem Med (Zagreb) (2015)

Bottom Line: We studied the evolution of those indicators over time and compared indicator results by way of the comparison of proportions and Chi-square.We present a practical and effective methodology to monitor unsuitable sample preanalytical errors.The synthetic indicator results summarize overall preanalytical sample errors, and can be used as part of BSC management system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Laboratory, Hospital Universitario de San Juan, San Juan de Alicante, Spain ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Elche, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Preanalytical control and monitoring continue to be an important issue for clinical laboratory professionals. The aim of the study was to evaluate a monitoring system of preanalytical errors regarding not suitable samples for analysis, based on different indicators; to compare such indicators in different phlebotomy centres; and finally to evaluate a single synthetic preanalytical indicator that may be included in the balanced scorecard management system (BSC).

Materials and methods: We collected individual and global preanalytical errors in haematology, coagulation, chemistry, and urine samples analysis. We also analyzed a synthetic indicator that represents the sum of all types of preanalytical errors, expressed in a sigma level. We studied the evolution of those indicators over time and compared indicator results by way of the comparison of proportions and Chi-square.

Results: There was a decrease in the number of errors along the years (P<0.001). This pattern was confirmed in primary care patients, inpatients and outpatients. In blood samples, fewer errors occurred in outpatients, followed by inpatients.

Conclusion: We present a practical and effective methodology to monitor unsuitable sample preanalytical errors. The synthetic indicator results summarize overall preanalytical sample errors, and can be used as part of BSC management system.

Show MeSH
Annual global indicator results in every type of patient: Shows the sum of all types of preanalytical errors with respect to every sample collected in inpatients, outpatients and primary care patient’s samples.
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f2: Annual global indicator results in every type of patient: Shows the sum of all types of preanalytical errors with respect to every sample collected in inpatients, outpatients and primary care patient’s samples.

Mentions: The annual global indicator results for inpatients, outpatients and primary care patients are shown in Figure 2. The greatest number of errors in blood samples occurred in primary care patients. Total blood errors per 10,000 samples in year 2012 were significantly (P = 0.011) higher in primary care patients (55.84) than in inpatients (52.18) and outpatients (14.19). All annual global indicators results were higher in 2003 when compared to 2012 (P < 0.001).


Ten years of preanalytical monitoring and control: Synthetic Balanced Score Card Indicator.

Salinas M, López-Garrigós M, Flores E, Santo-Quiles A, Gutierrez M, Lugo J, Lillo R, Leiva-Salinas C - Biochem Med (Zagreb) (2015)

Annual global indicator results in every type of patient: Shows the sum of all types of preanalytical errors with respect to every sample collected in inpatients, outpatients and primary care patient’s samples.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401317&req=5

f2: Annual global indicator results in every type of patient: Shows the sum of all types of preanalytical errors with respect to every sample collected in inpatients, outpatients and primary care patient’s samples.
Mentions: The annual global indicator results for inpatients, outpatients and primary care patients are shown in Figure 2. The greatest number of errors in blood samples occurred in primary care patients. Total blood errors per 10,000 samples in year 2012 were significantly (P = 0.011) higher in primary care patients (55.84) than in inpatients (52.18) and outpatients (14.19). All annual global indicators results were higher in 2003 when compared to 2012 (P < 0.001).

Bottom Line: We studied the evolution of those indicators over time and compared indicator results by way of the comparison of proportions and Chi-square.We present a practical and effective methodology to monitor unsuitable sample preanalytical errors.The synthetic indicator results summarize overall preanalytical sample errors, and can be used as part of BSC management system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Laboratory, Hospital Universitario de San Juan, San Juan de Alicante, Spain ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Elche, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Preanalytical control and monitoring continue to be an important issue for clinical laboratory professionals. The aim of the study was to evaluate a monitoring system of preanalytical errors regarding not suitable samples for analysis, based on different indicators; to compare such indicators in different phlebotomy centres; and finally to evaluate a single synthetic preanalytical indicator that may be included in the balanced scorecard management system (BSC).

Materials and methods: We collected individual and global preanalytical errors in haematology, coagulation, chemistry, and urine samples analysis. We also analyzed a synthetic indicator that represents the sum of all types of preanalytical errors, expressed in a sigma level. We studied the evolution of those indicators over time and compared indicator results by way of the comparison of proportions and Chi-square.

Results: There was a decrease in the number of errors along the years (P<0.001). This pattern was confirmed in primary care patients, inpatients and outpatients. In blood samples, fewer errors occurred in outpatients, followed by inpatients.

Conclusion: We present a practical and effective methodology to monitor unsuitable sample preanalytical errors. The synthetic indicator results summarize overall preanalytical sample errors, and can be used as part of BSC management system.

Show MeSH