Limits...
Increased plasma vaspin concentration in patients with sepsis: an exploratory examination.

Motal MC, Klaus DA, Lebherz-Eichinger D, Tudor B, Hamp T, Wiegele M, Seemann R, Krenn CG, Roth GA - Biochem Med (Zagreb) (2015)

Bottom Line: Vaspin concentrations were significantly higher in septic patients compared to the control group (0.3 (0.1-0.4) ng/mL vs. 0.1 (0.0-0.3) ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001).Vaspin concentration showed weak positive correlation with concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) (r=0.31, P=0.002) as well as with SAPS II (r=0.34, P=0.002) and maximum of SOFA (r=0.39, P<0.001) scoring systems, as tested for the overall study population.We demonstrated a weak positive correlation between vaspin and CRP concentration, as well as with two scoring systems commonly used in intensive care settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria ; RAIC Laboratory 13C1, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Vaspin (visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin) was first described as an insulin-sensitizing adipose tissue hormone. Recently its anti-inflammatory function has been demonstrated. Since no appropriate data is available yet, we sought to investigate the plasma concentrations of vaspin in sepsis.

Materials and methods: 57 patients in intensive care, fulfilling the ACCP/SCCM criteria for sepsis, were prospectively included in our exploratory study. The control group consisted of 48 critically ill patients, receiving intensive care after trauma or major surgery. Patients were matched by age, sex, weight and existence of diabetes before statistical analysis. Blood samples were collected on the day of diagnosis. Vaspin plasma concentrations were measured using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results: Vaspin concentrations were significantly higher in septic patients compared to the control group (0.3 (0.1-0.4) ng/mL vs. 0.1 (0.0-0.3) ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001). Vaspin concentration showed weak positive correlation with concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) (r=0.31, P=0.002) as well as with SAPS II (r=0.34, P=0.002) and maximum of SOFA (r=0.39, P<0.001) scoring systems, as tested for the overall study population.

Conclusion: In the sepsis group, vaspin plasma concentration was about three-fold as high as in the median surgical control group. We demonstrated a weak positive correlation between vaspin and CRP concentration, as well as with two scoring systems commonly used in intensive care settings. Although there seems to be some connection between vaspin and inflammation, its role in human sepsis needs to be evaluated further.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401312&req=5

Mentions: Plasma vaspin concentration was significantly higher in the sepsis group (0.3 (0.1-0.4) ng/mL) compared to the surgical control group (0.1 (0.0-0.3) ng/mL; P < 0.001). Vaspin concentration showed weak positive correlation with CRP concentration (r = 0.31, P = 0.002), the SAPS II (r = 0.34, P = 0.002) and maximum of SOFA (r = 0.39, P < 0.001) scores, as tested for the overall study population. There was no significant correlation between vaspin and CRP in the septic group alone (r = 0.24, P = 0.066). There was a weak, but statistically significant correlation between vaspin concentration and length of stay (r = 0.26, P = 0.009). No significant difference in plasma vaspin concentrations was observed comparing survivors and non-survivors, in the overall study population (P = 0.33) nor for the septic subgroup alone (P = 0.79). Measured vaspin plasma concentration did not correlate with APACHE II and WBC, neither for the whole of the tested population (APACHE II: r = 0.19, P = 0.12; WBC: r = 0.1, P = 0.3) nor for the septic patients’ (APACHE II: r = -0.08, P = 0.63; WBC: r = 0.07, P = 0.59) or control patients’ subsets (APACHE II: r = 0.02, P = 0.92; WBC: r = -0.15, P = 0.32) alone. Table 2 shows all calculated correlation data. The time series analysis of vaspin plasma concentration of nine patients did not show significant changes (P = 0.32) over eight consecutive days. Figure 1 shows the according plasma concentrations as boxplots.


Increased plasma vaspin concentration in patients with sepsis: an exploratory examination.

Motal MC, Klaus DA, Lebherz-Eichinger D, Tudor B, Hamp T, Wiegele M, Seemann R, Krenn CG, Roth GA - Biochem Med (Zagreb) (2015)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401312&req=5

Mentions: Plasma vaspin concentration was significantly higher in the sepsis group (0.3 (0.1-0.4) ng/mL) compared to the surgical control group (0.1 (0.0-0.3) ng/mL; P < 0.001). Vaspin concentration showed weak positive correlation with CRP concentration (r = 0.31, P = 0.002), the SAPS II (r = 0.34, P = 0.002) and maximum of SOFA (r = 0.39, P < 0.001) scores, as tested for the overall study population. There was no significant correlation between vaspin and CRP in the septic group alone (r = 0.24, P = 0.066). There was a weak, but statistically significant correlation between vaspin concentration and length of stay (r = 0.26, P = 0.009). No significant difference in plasma vaspin concentrations was observed comparing survivors and non-survivors, in the overall study population (P = 0.33) nor for the septic subgroup alone (P = 0.79). Measured vaspin plasma concentration did not correlate with APACHE II and WBC, neither for the whole of the tested population (APACHE II: r = 0.19, P = 0.12; WBC: r = 0.1, P = 0.3) nor for the septic patients’ (APACHE II: r = -0.08, P = 0.63; WBC: r = 0.07, P = 0.59) or control patients’ subsets (APACHE II: r = 0.02, P = 0.92; WBC: r = -0.15, P = 0.32) alone. Table 2 shows all calculated correlation data. The time series analysis of vaspin plasma concentration of nine patients did not show significant changes (P = 0.32) over eight consecutive days. Figure 1 shows the according plasma concentrations as boxplots.

Bottom Line: Vaspin concentrations were significantly higher in septic patients compared to the control group (0.3 (0.1-0.4) ng/mL vs. 0.1 (0.0-0.3) ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001).Vaspin concentration showed weak positive correlation with concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) (r=0.31, P=0.002) as well as with SAPS II (r=0.34, P=0.002) and maximum of SOFA (r=0.39, P<0.001) scoring systems, as tested for the overall study population.We demonstrated a weak positive correlation between vaspin and CRP concentration, as well as with two scoring systems commonly used in intensive care settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria ; RAIC Laboratory 13C1, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Vaspin (visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin) was first described as an insulin-sensitizing adipose tissue hormone. Recently its anti-inflammatory function has been demonstrated. Since no appropriate data is available yet, we sought to investigate the plasma concentrations of vaspin in sepsis.

Materials and methods: 57 patients in intensive care, fulfilling the ACCP/SCCM criteria for sepsis, were prospectively included in our exploratory study. The control group consisted of 48 critically ill patients, receiving intensive care after trauma or major surgery. Patients were matched by age, sex, weight and existence of diabetes before statistical analysis. Blood samples were collected on the day of diagnosis. Vaspin plasma concentrations were measured using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results: Vaspin concentrations were significantly higher in septic patients compared to the control group (0.3 (0.1-0.4) ng/mL vs. 0.1 (0.0-0.3) ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001). Vaspin concentration showed weak positive correlation with concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) (r=0.31, P=0.002) as well as with SAPS II (r=0.34, P=0.002) and maximum of SOFA (r=0.39, P<0.001) scoring systems, as tested for the overall study population.

Conclusion: In the sepsis group, vaspin plasma concentration was about three-fold as high as in the median surgical control group. We demonstrated a weak positive correlation between vaspin and CRP concentration, as well as with two scoring systems commonly used in intensive care settings. Although there seems to be some connection between vaspin and inflammation, its role in human sepsis needs to be evaluated further.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus