Limits...
Neurons produce FGF2 and VEGF and secrete them at least in part by shedding extracellular vesicles.

Schiera G, Proia P, Alberti C, Mineo M, Savettieri G, Di Liegro I - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2007 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: We previously found that neurons are able to affect the ability of brain capillary endothelial cells to form in vitro a monolayer with properties resembling the blood-brain barrier.In the present paper, we report that neurons produce both vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2, two well-known angiogenic factors.Shedding of extracellular vesicles by neurons was also confirmed by scanner electron microscopy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We previously found that neurons are able to affect the ability of brain capillary endothelial cells to form in vitro a monolayer with properties resembling the blood-brain barrier. We then looked, by immunofluorescence and western analysis, for factors, produced by neurons, with the potential to influence growth and differentiation of endothelial cells. In the present paper, we report that neurons produce both vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2, two well-known angiogenic factors. More interestingly, we gained evidence that both factors are released by neurons, at least in part, by shedding of extracellular vesicles, that contain beta1 integrin, a membrane protein already known to be part of extracellular vesicles released by tumour cells. Shedding of extracellular vesicles by neurons was also confirmed by scanner electron microscopy.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Different localization of the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, red fluorescence), and neuronspecific neurofilament protein, 68-kD component (NF68, green fluorescence), in cultures of rat cortical neurons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401300&req=5

fig04: Different localization of the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, red fluorescence), and neuronspecific neurofilament protein, 68-kD component (NF68, green fluorescence), in cultures of rat cortical neurons.

Mentions: As we know that neuronal cultures are contaminated by some rare astrocytes (Fig. 4), we also looked by immunofluorescence at colocalization in the same cell of different neuron-specific cytoskeletal proteins such as NF68 and microtubule-associated protein 2, MAP2) and either FGF-2- or VEGF- immunoreactivity. One example of this kind of analysis was reported in Fig. 5, that shows neurons immunostained for both MAP2 (A: red fluorescence) and VEGF (B: green fluorescence). Extracellular vesicles are clearly seen, attached to MAP2-positive cells.


Neurons produce FGF2 and VEGF and secrete them at least in part by shedding extracellular vesicles.

Schiera G, Proia P, Alberti C, Mineo M, Savettieri G, Di Liegro I - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2007 Nov-Dec)

Different localization of the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, red fluorescence), and neuronspecific neurofilament protein, 68-kD component (NF68, green fluorescence), in cultures of rat cortical neurons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401300&req=5

fig04: Different localization of the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, red fluorescence), and neuronspecific neurofilament protein, 68-kD component (NF68, green fluorescence), in cultures of rat cortical neurons.
Mentions: As we know that neuronal cultures are contaminated by some rare astrocytes (Fig. 4), we also looked by immunofluorescence at colocalization in the same cell of different neuron-specific cytoskeletal proteins such as NF68 and microtubule-associated protein 2, MAP2) and either FGF-2- or VEGF- immunoreactivity. One example of this kind of analysis was reported in Fig. 5, that shows neurons immunostained for both MAP2 (A: red fluorescence) and VEGF (B: green fluorescence). Extracellular vesicles are clearly seen, attached to MAP2-positive cells.

Bottom Line: We previously found that neurons are able to affect the ability of brain capillary endothelial cells to form in vitro a monolayer with properties resembling the blood-brain barrier.In the present paper, we report that neurons produce both vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2, two well-known angiogenic factors.Shedding of extracellular vesicles by neurons was also confirmed by scanner electron microscopy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Scienze Biochimiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
We previously found that neurons are able to affect the ability of brain capillary endothelial cells to form in vitro a monolayer with properties resembling the blood-brain barrier. We then looked, by immunofluorescence and western analysis, for factors, produced by neurons, with the potential to influence growth and differentiation of endothelial cells. In the present paper, we report that neurons produce both vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2, two well-known angiogenic factors. More interestingly, we gained evidence that both factors are released by neurons, at least in part, by shedding of extracellular vesicles, that contain beta1 integrin, a membrane protein already known to be part of extracellular vesicles released by tumour cells. Shedding of extracellular vesicles by neurons was also confirmed by scanner electron microscopy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus