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Human mesenchymal stem cells in contact with their environment: surface characteristics and the integrin system.

Docheva D, Popov C, Mutschler W, Schieker M - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2007 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: In this work, we will review the current state of knowledge on integrins and other adhesion molecules found to be expressed on MSCs.The discussed topics include the characteristics of MSCs and their clinical applications, integrins and their central role in cell-matrix attachment and migration, and comments on mobilization, differentiation and contribution to tumour development.Finally, by understanding the complex and fundamental pathways by which MSCs attach and migrate, it might be possible to fine-tune the strategies for effective and safe use of MSCs in regenerative therapies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Surgery and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery,Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. Denitsa.Docheva@med.uni-muenchen.de

ABSTRACT
The identification of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in adult human tissues and the disclosure of their self-renew-al and multi-lineage differentiation capabilities have provided exciting prospects for cell-based regeneration and tis-sue engineering. Although a considerable amount of data is available describing MSCs, there is still lack of information regarding the molecular mechanisms that govern their adhesion and migration. In this work, we will review the current state of knowledge on integrins and other adhesion molecules found to be expressed on MSCs. The discussed topics include the characteristics of MSCs and their clinical applications, integrins and their central role in cell-matrix attachment and migration, and comments on mobilization, differentiation and contribution to tumour development. Finally, by understanding the complex and fundamental pathways by which MSCs attach and migrate, it might be possible to fine-tune the strategies for effective and safe use of MSCs in regenerative therapies.

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An example of some accepted criteria that define mesenchymal stem cells. (A) Phase-contrast photomicrograph of human MSCs (supplier: Cambrex, USA) showing their fibroblastoid adherent phenotype. (B) Detection of CD105 antigen in hMSCs. Primary anti-CD105 antibody (Cat. no. P3D1, DSHB, USA), secondary antibody conjugated to Texas Red (in red), (Cat. no. 715-075-151, Dianova, Germany) and DAPI nuclear stain (in blue), (Cat. no. D1306, Molecular Probes, Germany) were used. (C and D) hMSCs were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and the deposition of a mineralized matrix visualized by von Kossa stain is shown in (C). The non-induced control is shown in (D). (E and F) Under adipogenic conditions, hMSCs accumulated lipid vacuoles, which are positively stained by Oil Red O assay (E), whereas in control media no such vacuoles were observed (F). (G and H) Chondrogenesis was indicated by collagen type II staining. A strong signal was detected in stimulated hMSC pellet-cultures (G). Control hMSC pellets clearly
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fig01: An example of some accepted criteria that define mesenchymal stem cells. (A) Phase-contrast photomicrograph of human MSCs (supplier: Cambrex, USA) showing their fibroblastoid adherent phenotype. (B) Detection of CD105 antigen in hMSCs. Primary anti-CD105 antibody (Cat. no. P3D1, DSHB, USA), secondary antibody conjugated to Texas Red (in red), (Cat. no. 715-075-151, Dianova, Germany) and DAPI nuclear stain (in blue), (Cat. no. D1306, Molecular Probes, Germany) were used. (C and D) hMSCs were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and the deposition of a mineralized matrix visualized by von Kossa stain is shown in (C). The non-induced control is shown in (D). (E and F) Under adipogenic conditions, hMSCs accumulated lipid vacuoles, which are positively stained by Oil Red O assay (E), whereas in control media no such vacuoles were observed (F). (G and H) Chondrogenesis was indicated by collagen type II staining. A strong signal was detected in stimulated hMSC pellet-cultures (G). Control hMSC pellets clearly

Mentions: We present the above-discussed criteria in Fig. 1. Shown are the phenotypes of typical cultures of hMSCs (derived from BM and purchased from Cambrex, USA) in a subconfluent monolayer, stained with the anti-CD105 antibody and when grown in control, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic media.


Human mesenchymal stem cells in contact with their environment: surface characteristics and the integrin system.

Docheva D, Popov C, Mutschler W, Schieker M - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2007 Jan-Feb)

An example of some accepted criteria that define mesenchymal stem cells. (A) Phase-contrast photomicrograph of human MSCs (supplier: Cambrex, USA) showing their fibroblastoid adherent phenotype. (B) Detection of CD105 antigen in hMSCs. Primary anti-CD105 antibody (Cat. no. P3D1, DSHB, USA), secondary antibody conjugated to Texas Red (in red), (Cat. no. 715-075-151, Dianova, Germany) and DAPI nuclear stain (in blue), (Cat. no. D1306, Molecular Probes, Germany) were used. (C and D) hMSCs were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and the deposition of a mineralized matrix visualized by von Kossa stain is shown in (C). The non-induced control is shown in (D). (E and F) Under adipogenic conditions, hMSCs accumulated lipid vacuoles, which are positively stained by Oil Red O assay (E), whereas in control media no such vacuoles were observed (F). (G and H) Chondrogenesis was indicated by collagen type II staining. A strong signal was detected in stimulated hMSC pellet-cultures (G). Control hMSC pellets clearly
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401218&req=5

fig01: An example of some accepted criteria that define mesenchymal stem cells. (A) Phase-contrast photomicrograph of human MSCs (supplier: Cambrex, USA) showing their fibroblastoid adherent phenotype. (B) Detection of CD105 antigen in hMSCs. Primary anti-CD105 antibody (Cat. no. P3D1, DSHB, USA), secondary antibody conjugated to Texas Red (in red), (Cat. no. 715-075-151, Dianova, Germany) and DAPI nuclear stain (in blue), (Cat. no. D1306, Molecular Probes, Germany) were used. (C and D) hMSCs were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and the deposition of a mineralized matrix visualized by von Kossa stain is shown in (C). The non-induced control is shown in (D). (E and F) Under adipogenic conditions, hMSCs accumulated lipid vacuoles, which are positively stained by Oil Red O assay (E), whereas in control media no such vacuoles were observed (F). (G and H) Chondrogenesis was indicated by collagen type II staining. A strong signal was detected in stimulated hMSC pellet-cultures (G). Control hMSC pellets clearly
Mentions: We present the above-discussed criteria in Fig. 1. Shown are the phenotypes of typical cultures of hMSCs (derived from BM and purchased from Cambrex, USA) in a subconfluent monolayer, stained with the anti-CD105 antibody and when grown in control, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic media.

Bottom Line: In this work, we will review the current state of knowledge on integrins and other adhesion molecules found to be expressed on MSCs.The discussed topics include the characteristics of MSCs and their clinical applications, integrins and their central role in cell-matrix attachment and migration, and comments on mobilization, differentiation and contribution to tumour development.Finally, by understanding the complex and fundamental pathways by which MSCs attach and migrate, it might be possible to fine-tune the strategies for effective and safe use of MSCs in regenerative therapies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Experimental Surgery and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery,Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. Denitsa.Docheva@med.uni-muenchen.de

ABSTRACT
The identification of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in adult human tissues and the disclosure of their self-renew-al and multi-lineage differentiation capabilities have provided exciting prospects for cell-based regeneration and tis-sue engineering. Although a considerable amount of data is available describing MSCs, there is still lack of information regarding the molecular mechanisms that govern their adhesion and migration. In this work, we will review the current state of knowledge on integrins and other adhesion molecules found to be expressed on MSCs. The discussed topics include the characteristics of MSCs and their clinical applications, integrins and their central role in cell-matrix attachment and migration, and comments on mobilization, differentiation and contribution to tumour development. Finally, by understanding the complex and fundamental pathways by which MSCs attach and migrate, it might be possible to fine-tune the strategies for effective and safe use of MSCs in regenerative therapies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus