Limits...
Unfavourable clinical implications for HLA-G expression in acute myeloid leukaemia.

Yan WH, Lin A, Chen BG, Luo WD, Dai MZ, Chen XJ, Xu HH, Li BL - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2008)

Bottom Line: In AML, HLA-G-positive patients had a significant higher bone marrow leukaemic blast cell percentage when compared with that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01).Total T-cell percentage was dramatically decreased in HLA-G-positive patients (P < 0.05).Cytogenetic karyotyping results showed that all HLA-G-positive AML patients (n= 5) were cytogenetically abnormal, which was markedly different from that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Center, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang province, Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai, Zhejiang, People's Republic of China. yanwhcom@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecule exerts multiple immunoregulatory functions that have been suggested to contribute to the immune evasion of tumour cells. Studies on HLA-G expression in malignant haematopoietic diseases are controversial, and the functions of HLA-G on this context are limited. In the current study, HLA-G expression was analysed in different types of patients: de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML, n = 54), B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL, n= 13), chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML, n= 9) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n= 11). HLA-G expression was observed in 18.5% cases of AML, 22.2% in CML and 18.2% in MDS, but not in B-ALL patients. In AML, HLA-G-positive patients had a significant higher bone marrow leukaemic blast cell percentage when compared with that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01). Total T-cell percentage was dramatically decreased in HLA-G-positive patients (P < 0.05). Cytogenetic karyotyping results showed that all HLA-G-positive AML patients (n= 5) were cytogenetically abnormal, which was markedly different from that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01). Ex vivo cytotoxicity analysis revealed that HLA-G expression in AML leukaemic cells could directly inhibit NK cell cytolysis (P < 0.01). These findings indicated that HLA-G expression in AML is of unfavourable clinical implications, and that HLA-G could be a potential target for therapy.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative cases of cell surface HLA-G expression in leukaemic blast cells. A PerCP-labelled anti-CD45 antibody was used to differentiate leukaemic cells from normal lymphocytes. Gating on leukaemic blasts characterized by CD45 dim/low side scatter (SSC) (upper panel). HLA-G-specific mAb FITC-labelled MEM-G/09 was used to detect HLA-G expression on the gated CD45 dim/low SSC cells (low panel).(A) High HLA-G expression.(B) Media HLA-G expression.(C) Low HLA-G expression.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401132&req=5

fig01: Representative cases of cell surface HLA-G expression in leukaemic blast cells. A PerCP-labelled anti-CD45 antibody was used to differentiate leukaemic cells from normal lymphocytes. Gating on leukaemic blasts characterized by CD45 dim/low side scatter (SSC) (upper panel). HLA-G-specific mAb FITC-labelled MEM-G/09 was used to detect HLA-G expression on the gated CD45 dim/low SSC cells (low panel).(A) High HLA-G expression.(B) Media HLA-G expression.(C) Low HLA-G expression.

Mentions: HLA-G was expressed in 14 out of 87 (16.1%) patients. Among them, 18.5% in AML patients, 22.2% in CML patients, 18.2% in MDS patients, while no HLA-G-positive patients with B-ALL was observed. The proportion of malignant haematopoietic cells expressing HLA-G molecules varied from 3.47% to 99.69%. For each subgroup of the leukaemic malignancy, the proportion of HLA-G expression on leukaemic cells varied from 3.47% to 99.69%, from 3.8% to 70.0%, from 8.8% to 13.8% for the AML, CML and MDS, respectively (Figs 1 and 2).


Unfavourable clinical implications for HLA-G expression in acute myeloid leukaemia.

Yan WH, Lin A, Chen BG, Luo WD, Dai MZ, Chen XJ, Xu HH, Li BL - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2008)

Representative cases of cell surface HLA-G expression in leukaemic blast cells. A PerCP-labelled anti-CD45 antibody was used to differentiate leukaemic cells from normal lymphocytes. Gating on leukaemic blasts characterized by CD45 dim/low side scatter (SSC) (upper panel). HLA-G-specific mAb FITC-labelled MEM-G/09 was used to detect HLA-G expression on the gated CD45 dim/low SSC cells (low panel).(A) High HLA-G expression.(B) Media HLA-G expression.(C) Low HLA-G expression.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401132&req=5

fig01: Representative cases of cell surface HLA-G expression in leukaemic blast cells. A PerCP-labelled anti-CD45 antibody was used to differentiate leukaemic cells from normal lymphocytes. Gating on leukaemic blasts characterized by CD45 dim/low side scatter (SSC) (upper panel). HLA-G-specific mAb FITC-labelled MEM-G/09 was used to detect HLA-G expression on the gated CD45 dim/low SSC cells (low panel).(A) High HLA-G expression.(B) Media HLA-G expression.(C) Low HLA-G expression.
Mentions: HLA-G was expressed in 14 out of 87 (16.1%) patients. Among them, 18.5% in AML patients, 22.2% in CML patients, 18.2% in MDS patients, while no HLA-G-positive patients with B-ALL was observed. The proportion of malignant haematopoietic cells expressing HLA-G molecules varied from 3.47% to 99.69%. For each subgroup of the leukaemic malignancy, the proportion of HLA-G expression on leukaemic cells varied from 3.47% to 99.69%, from 3.8% to 70.0%, from 8.8% to 13.8% for the AML, CML and MDS, respectively (Figs 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: In AML, HLA-G-positive patients had a significant higher bone marrow leukaemic blast cell percentage when compared with that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01).Total T-cell percentage was dramatically decreased in HLA-G-positive patients (P < 0.05).Cytogenetic karyotyping results showed that all HLA-G-positive AML patients (n= 5) were cytogenetically abnormal, which was markedly different from that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Research Center, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang province, Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai, Zhejiang, People's Republic of China. yanwhcom@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecule exerts multiple immunoregulatory functions that have been suggested to contribute to the immune evasion of tumour cells. Studies on HLA-G expression in malignant haematopoietic diseases are controversial, and the functions of HLA-G on this context are limited. In the current study, HLA-G expression was analysed in different types of patients: de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML, n = 54), B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL, n= 13), chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML, n= 9) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n= 11). HLA-G expression was observed in 18.5% cases of AML, 22.2% in CML and 18.2% in MDS, but not in B-ALL patients. In AML, HLA-G-positive patients had a significant higher bone marrow leukaemic blast cell percentage when compared with that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01). Total T-cell percentage was dramatically decreased in HLA-G-positive patients (P < 0.05). Cytogenetic karyotyping results showed that all HLA-G-positive AML patients (n= 5) were cytogenetically abnormal, which was markedly different from that of HLA-G-negative patients (P < 0.01). Ex vivo cytotoxicity analysis revealed that HLA-G expression in AML leukaemic cells could directly inhibit NK cell cytolysis (P < 0.01). These findings indicated that HLA-G expression in AML is of unfavourable clinical implications, and that HLA-G could be a potential target for therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus