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Fetal stem cells from extra-embryonic tissues: do not discard.

Marcus AJ, Woodbury D - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2008)

Bottom Line: Extra-embryonic tissues are large, potentially increasing the number of stem cells that can be extracted.Lastly, the generation and sequestration of cells that form extra-embryonic tissues occurs early in development and may endow resident stem cell populations with enhanced potency.In this review we summarize recent work examining the plasticity and clinical potential of fetal stem cells isolated from extra-embryonic tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Ira B. Black Center for Stem Cell Research and the Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854-5635, USA. marcusak@umdnj.edu

ABSTRACT
Stem cells hold promise to treat diseases currently unapproachable, including Parkinson's disease, liver disease and diabetes. Seminal research has demonstrated the ability of embryonic and adult stem cells to differentiate into clinically useful cell types in vitro and in vivo. More recently, the potential of fetal stem cells derived from extra-embryonic tissues has been investigated. Fetal stem cells are particularly appealing for clinical applications. The cells are readily isolated from tissues normally discarded at birth, avoiding ethical concerns that plague the isolation embryonic stem cells. Extra-embryonic tissues are large, potentially increasing the number of stem cells that can be extracted. Lastly, the generation and sequestration of cells that form extra-embryonic tissues occurs early in development and may endow resident stem cell populations with enhanced potency. In this review we summarize recent work examining the plasticity and clinical potential of fetal stem cells isolated from extra-embryonic tissues.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Extra-embryonic stem cell sources. Stem cells have been isolated from all extra-embryonic tissues, including the amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid, Wharton's jelly and placenta.
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fig01: Extra-embryonic stem cell sources. Stem cells have been isolated from all extra-embryonic tissues, including the amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid, Wharton's jelly and placenta.

Mentions: Over the past decades fetal stem cells have been isolated from multiple extra-embryonic tissues, reminiscent of gradual broadening of stem cell sources seen in the adult. Amniotic fluid (AF), Wharton's jelly, placenta and amnion have all generated putative stem cells (Fig. 1). The relative potency of these stem cell populations needs to be fully determined, and further investigation is ongoing.


Fetal stem cells from extra-embryonic tissues: do not discard.

Marcus AJ, Woodbury D - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2008)

Extra-embryonic stem cell sources. Stem cells have been isolated from all extra-embryonic tissues, including the amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid, Wharton's jelly and placenta.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401124&req=5

fig01: Extra-embryonic stem cell sources. Stem cells have been isolated from all extra-embryonic tissues, including the amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid, Wharton's jelly and placenta.
Mentions: Over the past decades fetal stem cells have been isolated from multiple extra-embryonic tissues, reminiscent of gradual broadening of stem cell sources seen in the adult. Amniotic fluid (AF), Wharton's jelly, placenta and amnion have all generated putative stem cells (Fig. 1). The relative potency of these stem cell populations needs to be fully determined, and further investigation is ongoing.

Bottom Line: Extra-embryonic tissues are large, potentially increasing the number of stem cells that can be extracted.Lastly, the generation and sequestration of cells that form extra-embryonic tissues occurs early in development and may endow resident stem cell populations with enhanced potency.In this review we summarize recent work examining the plasticity and clinical potential of fetal stem cells isolated from extra-embryonic tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Ira B. Black Center for Stem Cell Research and the Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854-5635, USA. marcusak@umdnj.edu

ABSTRACT
Stem cells hold promise to treat diseases currently unapproachable, including Parkinson's disease, liver disease and diabetes. Seminal research has demonstrated the ability of embryonic and adult stem cells to differentiate into clinically useful cell types in vitro and in vivo. More recently, the potential of fetal stem cells derived from extra-embryonic tissues has been investigated. Fetal stem cells are particularly appealing for clinical applications. The cells are readily isolated from tissues normally discarded at birth, avoiding ethical concerns that plague the isolation embryonic stem cells. Extra-embryonic tissues are large, potentially increasing the number of stem cells that can be extracted. Lastly, the generation and sequestration of cells that form extra-embryonic tissues occurs early in development and may endow resident stem cell populations with enhanced potency. In this review we summarize recent work examining the plasticity and clinical potential of fetal stem cells isolated from extra-embryonic tissues.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus