Limits...
Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members.

Tumin M, Raja Ariffin RN, Mohd Satar N, Ng KP, Lim SK, Chong CS - Iran. J. Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics.However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05).Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Dept. of Administrative Studies and Politics, Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ' preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members.

Methods: We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents' willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire.

Results: Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes) spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio) and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05).

Conclusion: Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration. By identifying the preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia.

No MeSH data available.


Preferred campaign mediums; the specifications of ethnic groups and donation status
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401057&req=5

Figure 1: Preferred campaign mediums; the specifications of ethnic groups and donation status

Mentions: Generally, the pool of respondent’s preferences tells that the electronic media channel (TV and Radio) is the most preferred to deliver organ donation messages. As shown in Table 3 and Fig. 1, the electronic media channel is preferred by 37% of the total respondents, followed by the face to face channel, which accounts for 18.6% of the total respondents’ preferences. Although the gap between the most preferred channel and the later three channels is about double in size, these three channels of face to face campaigns, public talks and social media captured about the same amount of preferences from the respondents, 18.6%, 18.3%, and 16% respectively. Interestingly, the respondents showed that the least preferred medium of information is the printed media.


Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members.

Tumin M, Raja Ariffin RN, Mohd Satar N, Ng KP, Lim SK, Chong CS - Iran. J. Public Health (2014)

Preferred campaign mediums; the specifications of ethnic groups and donation status
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401057&req=5

Figure 1: Preferred campaign mediums; the specifications of ethnic groups and donation status
Mentions: Generally, the pool of respondent’s preferences tells that the electronic media channel (TV and Radio) is the most preferred to deliver organ donation messages. As shown in Table 3 and Fig. 1, the electronic media channel is preferred by 37% of the total respondents, followed by the face to face channel, which accounts for 18.6% of the total respondents’ preferences. Although the gap between the most preferred channel and the later three channels is about double in size, these three channels of face to face campaigns, public talks and social media captured about the same amount of preferences from the respondents, 18.6%, 18.3%, and 16% respectively. Interestingly, the respondents showed that the least preferred medium of information is the printed media.

Bottom Line: Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics.However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05).Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Dept. of Administrative Studies and Politics, Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ' preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members.

Methods: We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents' willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire.

Results: Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes) spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio) and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05).

Conclusion: Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration. By identifying the preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia.

No MeSH data available.