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Co-father relationships among the Suruí (Paiter) of Brazil.

Walker RS, Yvinec C, Ellsworth RM, Bailey DH - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: We show that co-fathers roughly assort into two separate categories.In the affiliative category, co-father relationships are amicable when they are between close kin, namely brothers and father-son.In the competitive category, relationships are more likely of avoidance or open hostility when between more distant kin such as cousins or unrelated men of different clans.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri , Columbia, MI , USA.

ABSTRACT
Partible paternity refers to the conception belief that children can have multiple fathers ("co-fathers") and is common to indigenous cultures of lowland South America. The nature of social relationships observed between co-fathers reveals information about the reproductive strategies underlying partible paternity. Here we analyze clan, genealogical, and social relationships between co-fathers for the Suruí, an indigenous horticultural population in Brazil. We show that co-fathers roughly assort into two separate categories. In the affiliative category, co-father relationships are amicable when they are between close kin, namely brothers and father-son. In the competitive category, relationships are more likely of avoidance or open hostility when between more distant kin such as cousins or unrelated men of different clans. Results therefore imply multiple types of relationships, including both cooperative and competitive contexts, under the rubric of partible paternity. These complexities of partible paternity institutions add to our knowledge of the full range of cross-cultural variation in human mating/marriage arrangements and speak to the debate on whether or not humans should be classified as cooperative breeders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency distribution of the relatedness between co-fathers for the Suruí (A) and Ache (B) with bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals as compared to random pairs of men.
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fig-1: Frequency distribution of the relatedness between co-fathers for the Suruí (A) and Ache (B) with bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals as compared to random pairs of men.

Mentions: Average relatedness of the 64 Suruí co-father pairs is 0.129 (95% bootstrapped confidence interval 0.084–0.178), or around first cousin on average, and 61% are from the same clan. The average relatedness of all men alive recently is approximately a half-first cousin (0.057, 95% bootstrapped confidence interval 0.048–0.066). Therefore, average co-fathers are about twice as related as expected by chance. Figure 1A shows that co-fathers actually comprise slightly more unrelated (or low relatedness up to 0.01) dyads than expected by chance. Moreover, in the category of relatedness from 0.01 to 0.1, there are less co-fathers than expected by chance. In fact, the only category where co-fathers show higher relatedness than expected by chance is in the top category of 0.5 relatedness where 17% of all co-father dyads are father-son (n = 5) or full brothers (n = 6).


Co-father relationships among the Suruí (Paiter) of Brazil.

Walker RS, Yvinec C, Ellsworth RM, Bailey DH - PeerJ (2015)

Frequency distribution of the relatedness between co-fathers for the Suruí (A) and Ache (B) with bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals as compared to random pairs of men.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400877&req=5

fig-1: Frequency distribution of the relatedness between co-fathers for the Suruí (A) and Ache (B) with bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals as compared to random pairs of men.
Mentions: Average relatedness of the 64 Suruí co-father pairs is 0.129 (95% bootstrapped confidence interval 0.084–0.178), or around first cousin on average, and 61% are from the same clan. The average relatedness of all men alive recently is approximately a half-first cousin (0.057, 95% bootstrapped confidence interval 0.048–0.066). Therefore, average co-fathers are about twice as related as expected by chance. Figure 1A shows that co-fathers actually comprise slightly more unrelated (or low relatedness up to 0.01) dyads than expected by chance. Moreover, in the category of relatedness from 0.01 to 0.1, there are less co-fathers than expected by chance. In fact, the only category where co-fathers show higher relatedness than expected by chance is in the top category of 0.5 relatedness where 17% of all co-father dyads are father-son (n = 5) or full brothers (n = 6).

Bottom Line: We show that co-fathers roughly assort into two separate categories.In the affiliative category, co-father relationships are amicable when they are between close kin, namely brothers and father-son.In the competitive category, relationships are more likely of avoidance or open hostility when between more distant kin such as cousins or unrelated men of different clans.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri , Columbia, MI , USA.

ABSTRACT
Partible paternity refers to the conception belief that children can have multiple fathers ("co-fathers") and is common to indigenous cultures of lowland South America. The nature of social relationships observed between co-fathers reveals information about the reproductive strategies underlying partible paternity. Here we analyze clan, genealogical, and social relationships between co-fathers for the Suruí, an indigenous horticultural population in Brazil. We show that co-fathers roughly assort into two separate categories. In the affiliative category, co-father relationships are amicable when they are between close kin, namely brothers and father-son. In the competitive category, relationships are more likely of avoidance or open hostility when between more distant kin such as cousins or unrelated men of different clans. Results therefore imply multiple types of relationships, including both cooperative and competitive contexts, under the rubric of partible paternity. These complexities of partible paternity institutions add to our knowledge of the full range of cross-cultural variation in human mating/marriage arrangements and speak to the debate on whether or not humans should be classified as cooperative breeders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus