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Health Impact Assessment of increased cycling to place of work or education in Copenhagen.

Holm AL, Glümer C, Diderichsen F - BMJ Open (2012)

Bottom Line: Obtainment of the proposed increase in cycling could reduce the burden of disease in the study population by 19.5 DALY annually.This study illustrates how quantitative Health Impact Assessment can help clarify potential effects of policies: increased cycling involves opposing effects from different outcomes but with the overall health effect being positive.This result illustrates the importance of designing policies that promote the health benefits and minimise the health risks related to cycling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Section of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To quantify the effects of increased cycling on both mortality and morbidity.

Design: Health Impact Assessment.

Setting: Cycling to place of work or education in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Population: Effects were calculated based on the working-age population of Copenhagen.

Main outcome measures: The primary outcome measure was change in burden of disease (measured as disability-adjusted life years (DALY)) due to changed exposure to the health determinants physical inactivity, air pollution (particulate matter <2.5 μm) and traffic accidents.

Results: Obtainment of the proposed increase in cycling could reduce the burden of disease in the study population by 19.5 DALY annually. This overall effect comprised a reduction in the burden of disease from health outcomes associated with physical inactivity (76.0 DALY) and an increase in the burden of disease from outcomes associated with air pollution and traffic accidents (5.4 and 51.2 DALY, respectively).

Conclusion: This study illustrates how quantitative Health Impact Assessment can help clarify potential effects of policies: increased cycling involves opposing effects from different outcomes but with the overall health effect being positive. This result illustrates the importance of designing policies that promote the health benefits and minimise the health risks related to cycling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Analytical model of the health impact assessment of increased cycling to placeof work or education. The figure illustrates the relationship between policyproposal, relevant health determinants, health outcomes and aggregatedeffect.
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fig2: Analytical model of the health impact assessment of increased cycling to placeof work or education. The figure illustrates the relationship between policyproposal, relevant health determinants, health outcomes and aggregatedeffect.

Mentions: Our main factor of interest was change in travel pattern for people travelling toplace of work or education in Copenhagen on weekdays. The health effect of thisfactor was mediated through exposure to specific determinants of health. Thesedeterminants were identified in the scoping stage of the HIA (figure 1). Based on reviews of Danish and internationalepidemiological literature on transportation and health,i physical inactivity, air pollution and road traffic accidents were foundto be relevant to include as determinants of health in the effect analysis (figure 2).


Health Impact Assessment of increased cycling to place of work or education in Copenhagen.

Holm AL, Glümer C, Diderichsen F - BMJ Open (2012)

Analytical model of the health impact assessment of increased cycling to placeof work or education. The figure illustrates the relationship between policyproposal, relevant health determinants, health outcomes and aggregatedeffect.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400672&req=5

fig2: Analytical model of the health impact assessment of increased cycling to placeof work or education. The figure illustrates the relationship between policyproposal, relevant health determinants, health outcomes and aggregatedeffect.
Mentions: Our main factor of interest was change in travel pattern for people travelling toplace of work or education in Copenhagen on weekdays. The health effect of thisfactor was mediated through exposure to specific determinants of health. Thesedeterminants were identified in the scoping stage of the HIA (figure 1). Based on reviews of Danish and internationalepidemiological literature on transportation and health,i physical inactivity, air pollution and road traffic accidents were foundto be relevant to include as determinants of health in the effect analysis (figure 2).

Bottom Line: Obtainment of the proposed increase in cycling could reduce the burden of disease in the study population by 19.5 DALY annually.This study illustrates how quantitative Health Impact Assessment can help clarify potential effects of policies: increased cycling involves opposing effects from different outcomes but with the overall health effect being positive.This result illustrates the importance of designing policies that promote the health benefits and minimise the health risks related to cycling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Section of Social Medicine, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To quantify the effects of increased cycling on both mortality and morbidity.

Design: Health Impact Assessment.

Setting: Cycling to place of work or education in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Population: Effects were calculated based on the working-age population of Copenhagen.

Main outcome measures: The primary outcome measure was change in burden of disease (measured as disability-adjusted life years (DALY)) due to changed exposure to the health determinants physical inactivity, air pollution (particulate matter <2.5 μm) and traffic accidents.

Results: Obtainment of the proposed increase in cycling could reduce the burden of disease in the study population by 19.5 DALY annually. This overall effect comprised a reduction in the burden of disease from health outcomes associated with physical inactivity (76.0 DALY) and an increase in the burden of disease from outcomes associated with air pollution and traffic accidents (5.4 and 51.2 DALY, respectively).

Conclusion: This study illustrates how quantitative Health Impact Assessment can help clarify potential effects of policies: increased cycling involves opposing effects from different outcomes but with the overall health effect being positive. This result illustrates the importance of designing policies that promote the health benefits and minimise the health risks related to cycling.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus