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Self-perceived psychosomatic health in Swedish children, adolescents and young adults: an internet-based survey over time.

Friberg P, Hagquist C, Osika W - BMJ Open (2012)

Bottom Line: When comparing results obtained in 2010 with those obtained in 2007, young people of both sexes had a slightly better self-perceived health status in 2007.These complaints were more pronounced in the older age groups.When directing questions to a large community, internet-based surveys appear to be valuable tools.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The authors investigated self-perceived psychosomatic health in young people (10-24 years of age) in Sweden and analysed different samples during the years 2005 and 2007-2010 via a community website.

Design: Repeated cross-sectional surveys: (1) single question on a single day in 2005. (2) One specific question delivered on each of eight separate days in 2005. (3) The same eight questions delivered to smaller groups on the same day in 2007 and then again to randomly selected subjects in 2010.

Setting: Validated questionnaires launched on the internet by a recognised Swedish community site. Study participants were invited to answer questions about their health with full anonymity as they logged into their personal area.

Participants: 10-24-year-old children, adolescents and young adults.

Primary and secondary outcome measures: Self-reported psychosomatic health in terms of sex and age over time.

Results: A large number of responses were obtained (up to 140 000). The response rate for the single item on stress was 41%. A high percentage of young subjects responded that they felt stressed very often/often; the numbers were higher for women (47%) than for men (29%). Older teenaged women had more psychosomatic complaints than did men of similar ages; in contrast, among 10-12-year-old children, the percentage of psychosomatic complaints was similar for men and women. When comparing results obtained in 2010 with those obtained in 2007, young people of both sexes had a slightly better self-perceived health status in 2007.

Conclusions: During the period 2005-2010 a high percentage of young people, particularly females, 16-18 years of age, had psychosomatic complaints and considered themselves as being often or very often stressed. These complaints were more pronounced in the older age groups. When directing questions to a large community, internet-based surveys appear to be valuable tools.

No MeSH data available.


Bars depict the percentage of ‘never’ to ‘veryoften’ responses to the question ‘How often/seldom do you feelstressed?’ for 10–24-year-old females and males. The totalnumber of respondents was 148 395. For the statistics, see the text.
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fig1: Bars depict the percentage of ‘never’ to ‘veryoften’ responses to the question ‘How often/seldom do you feelstressed?’ for 10–24-year-old females and males. The totalnumber of respondents was 148 395. For the statistics, see the text.

Mentions: The single question about stress received 148 395 responses (85 330girls) from 10- to 24-year-olds. The vast majority of this population was between 10and 24 years old. When analysing the total population, we found that 30% ofthe women and 19% of the men considered themselves stressed very often (figure 1). Similarly, the response ‘yes,often’ was provided more often by women: 17% versus 10% in men(p<0.0001). When the 10–24-year-old population was divided into agesubgroups, we found that 16–18-year-old males and females reported the highestdegree of stress (very often): 22% for men and 37% for women (figure 2, p<0.0001). The lowest number of subjectsresponding ‘yes, often’ to stress was in the 10–12-year-oldgroup. Consistently, females were significantly more likely to report higher levelsof stress (‘very often’ and ‘often’) than males from 10to 24 years of age. The percentage of males responding ‘yes, veryoften’ to the stress question remained relatively constant at 20% from 13 to24 years of age, while the percentage of females responding ‘yes, veryoften’ increased until they reached 16–18 years old and levelledoff for those who were 19–24 years old. However, this older femalegroup still showed statistically significantly higher values for self-perceivedstress than males of the same age (figure 2).Men of all ages chose the alternative response ‘no, never’ to thequestion about stress statistically more frequently than women (figure 2).


Self-perceived psychosomatic health in Swedish children, adolescents and young adults: an internet-based survey over time.

Friberg P, Hagquist C, Osika W - BMJ Open (2012)

Bars depict the percentage of ‘never’ to ‘veryoften’ responses to the question ‘How often/seldom do you feelstressed?’ for 10–24-year-old females and males. The totalnumber of respondents was 148 395. For the statistics, see the text.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400616&req=5

fig1: Bars depict the percentage of ‘never’ to ‘veryoften’ responses to the question ‘How often/seldom do you feelstressed?’ for 10–24-year-old females and males. The totalnumber of respondents was 148 395. For the statistics, see the text.
Mentions: The single question about stress received 148 395 responses (85 330girls) from 10- to 24-year-olds. The vast majority of this population was between 10and 24 years old. When analysing the total population, we found that 30% ofthe women and 19% of the men considered themselves stressed very often (figure 1). Similarly, the response ‘yes,often’ was provided more often by women: 17% versus 10% in men(p<0.0001). When the 10–24-year-old population was divided into agesubgroups, we found that 16–18-year-old males and females reported the highestdegree of stress (very often): 22% for men and 37% for women (figure 2, p<0.0001). The lowest number of subjectsresponding ‘yes, often’ to stress was in the 10–12-year-oldgroup. Consistently, females were significantly more likely to report higher levelsof stress (‘very often’ and ‘often’) than males from 10to 24 years of age. The percentage of males responding ‘yes, veryoften’ to the stress question remained relatively constant at 20% from 13 to24 years of age, while the percentage of females responding ‘yes, veryoften’ increased until they reached 16–18 years old and levelledoff for those who were 19–24 years old. However, this older femalegroup still showed statistically significantly higher values for self-perceivedstress than males of the same age (figure 2).Men of all ages chose the alternative response ‘no, never’ to thequestion about stress statistically more frequently than women (figure 2).

Bottom Line: When comparing results obtained in 2010 with those obtained in 2007, young people of both sexes had a slightly better self-perceived health status in 2007.These complaints were more pronounced in the older age groups.When directing questions to a large community, internet-based surveys appear to be valuable tools.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The authors investigated self-perceived psychosomatic health in young people (10-24 years of age) in Sweden and analysed different samples during the years 2005 and 2007-2010 via a community website.

Design: Repeated cross-sectional surveys: (1) single question on a single day in 2005. (2) One specific question delivered on each of eight separate days in 2005. (3) The same eight questions delivered to smaller groups on the same day in 2007 and then again to randomly selected subjects in 2010.

Setting: Validated questionnaires launched on the internet by a recognised Swedish community site. Study participants were invited to answer questions about their health with full anonymity as they logged into their personal area.

Participants: 10-24-year-old children, adolescents and young adults.

Primary and secondary outcome measures: Self-reported psychosomatic health in terms of sex and age over time.

Results: A large number of responses were obtained (up to 140 000). The response rate for the single item on stress was 41%. A high percentage of young subjects responded that they felt stressed very often/often; the numbers were higher for women (47%) than for men (29%). Older teenaged women had more psychosomatic complaints than did men of similar ages; in contrast, among 10-12-year-old children, the percentage of psychosomatic complaints was similar for men and women. When comparing results obtained in 2010 with those obtained in 2007, young people of both sexes had a slightly better self-perceived health status in 2007.

Conclusions: During the period 2005-2010 a high percentage of young people, particularly females, 16-18 years of age, had psychosomatic complaints and considered themselves as being often or very often stressed. These complaints were more pronounced in the older age groups. When directing questions to a large community, internet-based surveys appear to be valuable tools.

No MeSH data available.