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The effect of water temperature on routine swimming behaviour of new born guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

Kent M, Ojanguren AF - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Using model selection, we found that body length and temperature had a significant positive relationship with speed.Variation in speed decreased with rising temperatures and fish swam slightly closer to the bottom at higher temperatures.Our results indicate that guppies have a large thermal range and show substantial plasticity in routine swimming behaviours, which may account for their success as an invasive species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Biological Diversity, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, KY16 8LB, Scotland, UK maudiakent@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Graph of average swimming speed (mm s−1) across all replicates against acclimation temperature by population.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.
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f02: Graph of average swimming speed (mm s−1) across all replicates against acclimation temperature by population.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.

Mentions: A series of six models were tested for their effects on speed, variation in speed, depth, and variation in depth. The variables tested within the set of models included temperature, temperature squared (T2), standard length, and an interaction between temperature and length. When testing these models against speed (Table 1), model 2 had the lowest Akaike's information criterion for finite samples (AICc) and received a weight of 0.49. The other top model, model 1, had a Δi value of 1.39 and weight of 0.25. Both model 1 and 2 include length and temperature, though model 1 also allows for a non-linear relationship through the inclusion of T2. Given that both models have essentially the same log-likelihood value (−116.9 vs. −116.5), the additional variable, T2, adds little to the top model and can be considered an uninformative parameter (Burnham and Anderson, 2008; Arnold, 2010). Within the top model, both length and temperature are significant (F(2,110) = 21.04, p-value<0.001). Increases in both these variables resulted in corresponding increases in swimming speed (Fig. 2). Fig. 2 shows average speeds from each population across both replicates against acclimation temperature. Although T2 did not add to the best model, the polynomial trendlines on this graph suggest that had higher temperatures been tested, there may have been a drop in performance and more conformity to a typical TPC.


The effect of water temperature on routine swimming behaviour of new born guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

Kent M, Ojanguren AF - Biol Open (2015)

Graph of average swimming speed (mm s−1) across all replicates against acclimation temperature by population.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400596&req=5

f02: Graph of average swimming speed (mm s−1) across all replicates against acclimation temperature by population.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.
Mentions: A series of six models were tested for their effects on speed, variation in speed, depth, and variation in depth. The variables tested within the set of models included temperature, temperature squared (T2), standard length, and an interaction between temperature and length. When testing these models against speed (Table 1), model 2 had the lowest Akaike's information criterion for finite samples (AICc) and received a weight of 0.49. The other top model, model 1, had a Δi value of 1.39 and weight of 0.25. Both model 1 and 2 include length and temperature, though model 1 also allows for a non-linear relationship through the inclusion of T2. Given that both models have essentially the same log-likelihood value (−116.9 vs. −116.5), the additional variable, T2, adds little to the top model and can be considered an uninformative parameter (Burnham and Anderson, 2008; Arnold, 2010). Within the top model, both length and temperature are significant (F(2,110) = 21.04, p-value<0.001). Increases in both these variables resulted in corresponding increases in swimming speed (Fig. 2). Fig. 2 shows average speeds from each population across both replicates against acclimation temperature. Although T2 did not add to the best model, the polynomial trendlines on this graph suggest that had higher temperatures been tested, there may have been a drop in performance and more conformity to a typical TPC.

Bottom Line: Using model selection, we found that body length and temperature had a significant positive relationship with speed.Variation in speed decreased with rising temperatures and fish swam slightly closer to the bottom at higher temperatures.Our results indicate that guppies have a large thermal range and show substantial plasticity in routine swimming behaviours, which may account for their success as an invasive species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Biological Diversity, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, KY16 8LB, Scotland, UK maudiakent@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus