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The effect of water temperature on routine swimming behaviour of new born guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

Kent M, Ojanguren AF - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Using model selection, we found that body length and temperature had a significant positive relationship with speed.Variation in speed decreased with rising temperatures and fish swam slightly closer to the bottom at higher temperatures.Our results indicate that guppies have a large thermal range and show substantial plasticity in routine swimming behaviours, which may account for their success as an invasive species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Biological Diversity, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, KY16 8LB, Scotland, UK maudiakent@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of experimental setup and apparatus used. A camera was placed 1 m away from a glass tank (10×10×10 cm) placed in a 3-sided Styrofoam insulation chamber with a mirror at 45° overhead.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.
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f01: Illustration of experimental setup and apparatus used. A camera was placed 1 m away from a glass tank (10×10×10 cm) placed in a 3-sided Styrofoam insulation chamber with a mirror at 45° overhead.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.

Mentions: Every day at least an hour before testing began, the fish were fed flake food ad libitum to avoid differences in satiation rate that could affect swimming behaviour during video recording. Using water from the water bath to ensure that testing occurred at the appropriate test temperature, fish were placed in 10×10×10 cm glass observation tanks filled to a depth of about 9 mm, with a mirror positioned at 45° overhead. To prevent drastic temperature changes during the filming period, four sides of the glass observation tanks were insulated with polystyrene (Fig. 1). After allowing the fish at least 3 min to get used to the conditions inside the chamber, they were filmed for 10 min with a video camera located approximately 1 m from the observation tank at 30 frames per second. After each trial, fish were photographed and measured for standard length (mm), then placed in stock juvenile tanks.


The effect of water temperature on routine swimming behaviour of new born guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

Kent M, Ojanguren AF - Biol Open (2015)

Illustration of experimental setup and apparatus used. A camera was placed 1 m away from a glass tank (10×10×10 cm) placed in a 3-sided Styrofoam insulation chamber with a mirror at 45° overhead.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400596&req=5

f01: Illustration of experimental setup and apparatus used. A camera was placed 1 m away from a glass tank (10×10×10 cm) placed in a 3-sided Styrofoam insulation chamber with a mirror at 45° overhead.The graph shows 2nd order polynomial trendlines fitted to mean speeds per temperature.
Mentions: Every day at least an hour before testing began, the fish were fed flake food ad libitum to avoid differences in satiation rate that could affect swimming behaviour during video recording. Using water from the water bath to ensure that testing occurred at the appropriate test temperature, fish were placed in 10×10×10 cm glass observation tanks filled to a depth of about 9 mm, with a mirror positioned at 45° overhead. To prevent drastic temperature changes during the filming period, four sides of the glass observation tanks were insulated with polystyrene (Fig. 1). After allowing the fish at least 3 min to get used to the conditions inside the chamber, they were filmed for 10 min with a video camera located approximately 1 m from the observation tank at 30 frames per second. After each trial, fish were photographed and measured for standard length (mm), then placed in stock juvenile tanks.

Bottom Line: Using model selection, we found that body length and temperature had a significant positive relationship with speed.Variation in speed decreased with rising temperatures and fish swam slightly closer to the bottom at higher temperatures.Our results indicate that guppies have a large thermal range and show substantial plasticity in routine swimming behaviours, which may account for their success as an invasive species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Biological Diversity, Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St Andrews, KY16 8LB, Scotland, UK maudiakent@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus