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Differences in the fatty-acid composition of rodent spermatozoa are associated to levels of sperm competition.

delBarco-Trillo J, Mateo R, Roldan ER - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: To test these predictions, we quantified the fatty-acid composition of sperm, testis and liver cells in four mouse species (genus Mus) that differ in their levels of sperm competition.Fatty-acid composition in testis and liver cells was not associated to sperm competition levels.Two particular fatty acids were most responsible for this pattern (arachidonic acid and palmitic acid).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reproductive Ecology and Biology Group, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, 28006 Madrid, Spain Present address: School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UA, UK. delbarcotrillo@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of the most abundant saturated fatty acids in sperm cells.The two saturated fatty acids that compose more than 5% of the fatty acids in sperm cells are represented. The modified boxplots present the following information: the bar within each box represents the sample median, each box represents 50% of the data around the median, and the two whiskers around each box represent the 95% confidence interval (n = 5 for each species, except n = 4 in the case of sperm data for M. spretus); circles represent outliers.
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f03: Percentage of the most abundant saturated fatty acids in sperm cells.The two saturated fatty acids that compose more than 5% of the fatty acids in sperm cells are represented. The modified boxplots present the following information: the bar within each box represents the sample median, each box represents 50% of the data around the median, and the two whiskers around each box represent the 95% confidence interval (n = 5 for each species, except n = 4 in the case of sperm data for M. spretus); circles represent outliers.

Mentions: Only two SFAs (16:0 and 18:0) represented each more than 5% of all fatty acids in sperm cells. Significant differences among species were observed for 16:0 (F3,15 = 37.6, p<0.0001) but not for 18:0 (F3,15 = 0.29, p = 0.83; Fig. 3). All pairwise comparisons among species for 16:0 were significant (p<0.05) except between M. spretus and M. spicilegus (p = 0.83; Fig. 3). Overall, we observed that the percentage of 16:0 in sperm cells increases as RTS increases.


Differences in the fatty-acid composition of rodent spermatozoa are associated to levels of sperm competition.

delBarco-Trillo J, Mateo R, Roldan ER - Biol Open (2015)

Percentage of the most abundant saturated fatty acids in sperm cells.The two saturated fatty acids that compose more than 5% of the fatty acids in sperm cells are represented. The modified boxplots present the following information: the bar within each box represents the sample median, each box represents 50% of the data around the median, and the two whiskers around each box represent the 95% confidence interval (n = 5 for each species, except n = 4 in the case of sperm data for M. spretus); circles represent outliers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400589&req=5

f03: Percentage of the most abundant saturated fatty acids in sperm cells.The two saturated fatty acids that compose more than 5% of the fatty acids in sperm cells are represented. The modified boxplots present the following information: the bar within each box represents the sample median, each box represents 50% of the data around the median, and the two whiskers around each box represent the 95% confidence interval (n = 5 for each species, except n = 4 in the case of sperm data for M. spretus); circles represent outliers.
Mentions: Only two SFAs (16:0 and 18:0) represented each more than 5% of all fatty acids in sperm cells. Significant differences among species were observed for 16:0 (F3,15 = 37.6, p<0.0001) but not for 18:0 (F3,15 = 0.29, p = 0.83; Fig. 3). All pairwise comparisons among species for 16:0 were significant (p<0.05) except between M. spretus and M. spicilegus (p = 0.83; Fig. 3). Overall, we observed that the percentage of 16:0 in sperm cells increases as RTS increases.

Bottom Line: To test these predictions, we quantified the fatty-acid composition of sperm, testis and liver cells in four mouse species (genus Mus) that differ in their levels of sperm competition.Fatty-acid composition in testis and liver cells was not associated to sperm competition levels.Two particular fatty acids were most responsible for this pattern (arachidonic acid and palmitic acid).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reproductive Ecology and Biology Group, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, 28006 Madrid, Spain Present address: School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UA, UK. delbarcotrillo@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus