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Can crayfish take the heat? Procambarus clarkii show nociceptive behaviour to high temperature stimuli, but not low temperature or chemical stimuli.

Puri S, Faulkes Z - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Crayfish showed no difference in behavioural response to low temperature stimuli.Crayfish also showed no significant changes in behaviour when stimulated with capsaicin or isothiocyanate compared to controls, and neurons in the antenna did not change their firing rate following application of capsaicin or isothiocyanate.Noxious high temperatures appear to be a potentially ecologically relevant noxious stimulus for crayfish that can be detected by sensory neurons, which may be specialized nociceptors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Behaviour of crayfish in response to chemicals that often stimulate nociceptors.(A) Crayfish were presented with peppers containing both low (Anaheim peppers) and high (habanero peppers) concentrations of capsaicin simultaneously. The amount eaten (Y axis) was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 50% eaten; 3 = 50–89% eaten; 4 = 90–99% eaten; 5 = entirely eaten. (B) Crayfish presented with fresh wasabi rhizomes containing isothiocyanate. The amount eaten was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 25%; 3 = 25–50%; 4 = 51–75%; 5 = 76–99%, 6 = 100%. (C) Movement of crayfish measured by number of times individuals crossed between tank halves after application of control (ethanol) or 10 mmol l−1 capsaicin 10 mmol l−1 isothiocyanate to one antenna. Error bars show standard deviation.
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f03: Behaviour of crayfish in response to chemicals that often stimulate nociceptors.(A) Crayfish were presented with peppers containing both low (Anaheim peppers) and high (habanero peppers) concentrations of capsaicin simultaneously. The amount eaten (Y axis) was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 50% eaten; 3 = 50–89% eaten; 4 = 90–99% eaten; 5 = entirely eaten. (B) Crayfish presented with fresh wasabi rhizomes containing isothiocyanate. The amount eaten was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 25%; 3 = 25–50%; 4 = 51–75%; 5 = 76–99%, 6 = 100%. (C) Movement of crayfish measured by number of times individuals crossed between tank halves after application of control (ethanol) or 10 mmol l−1 capsaicin 10 mmol l−1 isothiocyanate to one antenna. Error bars show standard deviation.

Mentions: If crayfish detect capsaicin, as many mammals and multiple invertebrate species do, they would be expected to eat the food with low capsaicin concentrations before they ate the food with high capsaicin concentrations. The opposite occurs (Fig. 3A): crayfish ate larger amounts of habanero peppers than Anaheim peppers. Crayfish ate wasabi slices, although they were often slow to do so (Fig. 3B). Wasabi slices tend to float on the surface of the water, making it more difficult for crayfish to grab and handle the food.


Can crayfish take the heat? Procambarus clarkii show nociceptive behaviour to high temperature stimuli, but not low temperature or chemical stimuli.

Puri S, Faulkes Z - Biol Open (2015)

Behaviour of crayfish in response to chemicals that often stimulate nociceptors.(A) Crayfish were presented with peppers containing both low (Anaheim peppers) and high (habanero peppers) concentrations of capsaicin simultaneously. The amount eaten (Y axis) was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 50% eaten; 3 = 50–89% eaten; 4 = 90–99% eaten; 5 = entirely eaten. (B) Crayfish presented with fresh wasabi rhizomes containing isothiocyanate. The amount eaten was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 25%; 3 = 25–50%; 4 = 51–75%; 5 = 76–99%, 6 = 100%. (C) Movement of crayfish measured by number of times individuals crossed between tank halves after application of control (ethanol) or 10 mmol l−1 capsaicin 10 mmol l−1 isothiocyanate to one antenna. Error bars show standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400587&req=5

f03: Behaviour of crayfish in response to chemicals that often stimulate nociceptors.(A) Crayfish were presented with peppers containing both low (Anaheim peppers) and high (habanero peppers) concentrations of capsaicin simultaneously. The amount eaten (Y axis) was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 50% eaten; 3 = 50–89% eaten; 4 = 90–99% eaten; 5 = entirely eaten. (B) Crayfish presented with fresh wasabi rhizomes containing isothiocyanate. The amount eaten was coded as: 1 = not eaten, 2 = less than 25%; 3 = 25–50%; 4 = 51–75%; 5 = 76–99%, 6 = 100%. (C) Movement of crayfish measured by number of times individuals crossed between tank halves after application of control (ethanol) or 10 mmol l−1 capsaicin 10 mmol l−1 isothiocyanate to one antenna. Error bars show standard deviation.
Mentions: If crayfish detect capsaicin, as many mammals and multiple invertebrate species do, they would be expected to eat the food with low capsaicin concentrations before they ate the food with high capsaicin concentrations. The opposite occurs (Fig. 3A): crayfish ate larger amounts of habanero peppers than Anaheim peppers. Crayfish ate wasabi slices, although they were often slow to do so (Fig. 3B). Wasabi slices tend to float on the surface of the water, making it more difficult for crayfish to grab and handle the food.

Bottom Line: Crayfish showed no difference in behavioural response to low temperature stimuli.Crayfish also showed no significant changes in behaviour when stimulated with capsaicin or isothiocyanate compared to controls, and neurons in the antenna did not change their firing rate following application of capsaicin or isothiocyanate.Noxious high temperatures appear to be a potentially ecologically relevant noxious stimulus for crayfish that can be detected by sensory neurons, which may be specialized nociceptors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus