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Can crayfish take the heat? Procambarus clarkii show nociceptive behaviour to high temperature stimuli, but not low temperature or chemical stimuli.

Puri S, Faulkes Z - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Crayfish showed no difference in behavioural response to low temperature stimuli.Crayfish also showed no significant changes in behaviour when stimulated with capsaicin or isothiocyanate compared to controls, and neurons in the antenna did not change their firing rate following application of capsaicin or isothiocyanate.Noxious high temperatures appear to be a potentially ecologically relevant noxious stimulus for crayfish that can be detected by sensory neurons, which may be specialized nociceptors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Physiology of neurons in antenna of crayfish in response to high temperature stimuli.(A,B) Representative recordings of low-frequency baseline nerve and high-frequency baseline nerve. Bars above traces indicate approximate delivery of 100 µl saline stimulus; c = control; h = high temperature. (C,D) Increase in number of action potentials relative to baseline spontaneous activity generated in response to delivery of 100 µl of saline in (C) low-frequency baseline nerve, and (D) high-frequency baseline nerve. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum.
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f02: Physiology of neurons in antenna of crayfish in response to high temperature stimuli.(A,B) Representative recordings of low-frequency baseline nerve and high-frequency baseline nerve. Bars above traces indicate approximate delivery of 100 µl saline stimulus; c = control; h = high temperature. (C,D) Increase in number of action potentials relative to baseline spontaneous activity generated in response to delivery of 100 µl of saline in (C) low-frequency baseline nerve, and (D) high-frequency baseline nerve. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum.

Mentions: Neurophysiological recordings in the antennal nerve also showed a difference between high temperature stimuli and room temperature controls, delivered as transient exposure to small amounts of physiological saline. There are two branches of the antennal nerve, which differ in their baseline activity (Fig. 2A,B). Neural activity in the antenna to high temperature stimuli was significantly higher than control stimuli in both the low-baseline (paired t-test, t6 = −4.10, p = 0.0064; Fig. 2C) and the high baseline (paired t-test, t8 = −2.53, p = 0.035; Fig. 2D) branches of the nerve.


Can crayfish take the heat? Procambarus clarkii show nociceptive behaviour to high temperature stimuli, but not low temperature or chemical stimuli.

Puri S, Faulkes Z - Biol Open (2015)

Physiology of neurons in antenna of crayfish in response to high temperature stimuli.(A,B) Representative recordings of low-frequency baseline nerve and high-frequency baseline nerve. Bars above traces indicate approximate delivery of 100 µl saline stimulus; c = control; h = high temperature. (C,D) Increase in number of action potentials relative to baseline spontaneous activity generated in response to delivery of 100 µl of saline in (C) low-frequency baseline nerve, and (D) high-frequency baseline nerve. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400587&req=5

f02: Physiology of neurons in antenna of crayfish in response to high temperature stimuli.(A,B) Representative recordings of low-frequency baseline nerve and high-frequency baseline nerve. Bars above traces indicate approximate delivery of 100 µl saline stimulus; c = control; h = high temperature. (C,D) Increase in number of action potentials relative to baseline spontaneous activity generated in response to delivery of 100 µl of saline in (C) low-frequency baseline nerve, and (D) high-frequency baseline nerve. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum.
Mentions: Neurophysiological recordings in the antennal nerve also showed a difference between high temperature stimuli and room temperature controls, delivered as transient exposure to small amounts of physiological saline. There are two branches of the antennal nerve, which differ in their baseline activity (Fig. 2A,B). Neural activity in the antenna to high temperature stimuli was significantly higher than control stimuli in both the low-baseline (paired t-test, t6 = −4.10, p = 0.0064; Fig. 2C) and the high baseline (paired t-test, t8 = −2.53, p = 0.035; Fig. 2D) branches of the nerve.

Bottom Line: Crayfish showed no difference in behavioural response to low temperature stimuli.Crayfish also showed no significant changes in behaviour when stimulated with capsaicin or isothiocyanate compared to controls, and neurons in the antenna did not change their firing rate following application of capsaicin or isothiocyanate.Noxious high temperatures appear to be a potentially ecologically relevant noxious stimulus for crayfish that can be detected by sensory neurons, which may be specialized nociceptors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus