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Can crayfish take the heat? Procambarus clarkii show nociceptive behaviour to high temperature stimuli, but not low temperature or chemical stimuli.

Puri S, Faulkes Z - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Crayfish showed no difference in behavioural response to low temperature stimuli.Crayfish also showed no significant changes in behaviour when stimulated with capsaicin or isothiocyanate compared to controls, and neurons in the antenna did not change their firing rate following application of capsaicin or isothiocyanate.Noxious high temperatures appear to be a potentially ecologically relevant noxious stimulus for crayfish that can be detected by sensory neurons, which may be specialized nociceptors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Behaviour of crayfish in response to noxious thermal stimuli.(A,B) Thermal images of (A) soldering iron tip and (B) crayfish immediately after being touched by soldering iron. (C,D) Response of crayfish touched on the claw with (C) high temperature stimulus or (D) low temperature noxious stimulus. (E) Proportion of crayfish responding to touch on claw with high temperature stimulus. n = 11. (F) Latency of response to touch on the antennae. No response within 30 s was coded as 30 s. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum. n = 11.
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f01: Behaviour of crayfish in response to noxious thermal stimuli.(A,B) Thermal images of (A) soldering iron tip and (B) crayfish immediately after being touched by soldering iron. (C,D) Response of crayfish touched on the claw with (C) high temperature stimulus or (D) low temperature noxious stimulus. (E) Proportion of crayfish responding to touch on claw with high temperature stimulus. n = 11. (F) Latency of response to touch on the antennae. No response within 30 s was coded as 30 s. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum. n = 11.

Mentions: For the first behavioural experiments, crayfish were removed from water and placed in a small tank, and presented with control and high temperature stimuli on the claw. For high temperatures, we touched crayfish with the lightest pressure possible (i.e., touching rather than pressing the tip against the claw) in the nook of the claw (i.e., where the dactyl meets the propus in the interior gripping surface of a chela) with a soldering iron either at ∼20°C (room temperature control) or heated to ∼54°C. The soldering iron was plugged into a variable transformer to reduce its temperature, which was measured with a Fluke Ti9 thermal imaging camera (Fig. 1A). The temperature of the tissue elevated quickly even after a brief touch of the soldering iron (Fig. 1B). If the crayfish did not remove its claw from the soldering iron, we held the soldering iron against the claw for 3 s.


Can crayfish take the heat? Procambarus clarkii show nociceptive behaviour to high temperature stimuli, but not low temperature or chemical stimuli.

Puri S, Faulkes Z - Biol Open (2015)

Behaviour of crayfish in response to noxious thermal stimuli.(A,B) Thermal images of (A) soldering iron tip and (B) crayfish immediately after being touched by soldering iron. (C,D) Response of crayfish touched on the claw with (C) high temperature stimulus or (D) low temperature noxious stimulus. (E) Proportion of crayfish responding to touch on claw with high temperature stimulus. n = 11. (F) Latency of response to touch on the antennae. No response within 30 s was coded as 30 s. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum. n = 11.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400587&req=5

f01: Behaviour of crayfish in response to noxious thermal stimuli.(A,B) Thermal images of (A) soldering iron tip and (B) crayfish immediately after being touched by soldering iron. (C,D) Response of crayfish touched on the claw with (C) high temperature stimulus or (D) low temperature noxious stimulus. (E) Proportion of crayfish responding to touch on claw with high temperature stimulus. n = 11. (F) Latency of response to touch on the antennae. No response within 30 s was coded as 30 s. Dot = mean; line dividing box = median; box = 50% of data; whiskers = 95% of data; asterisks = minimum and maximum. n = 11.
Mentions: For the first behavioural experiments, crayfish were removed from water and placed in a small tank, and presented with control and high temperature stimuli on the claw. For high temperatures, we touched crayfish with the lightest pressure possible (i.e., touching rather than pressing the tip against the claw) in the nook of the claw (i.e., where the dactyl meets the propus in the interior gripping surface of a chela) with a soldering iron either at ∼20°C (room temperature control) or heated to ∼54°C. The soldering iron was plugged into a variable transformer to reduce its temperature, which was measured with a Fluke Ti9 thermal imaging camera (Fig. 1A). The temperature of the tissue elevated quickly even after a brief touch of the soldering iron (Fig. 1B). If the crayfish did not remove its claw from the soldering iron, we held the soldering iron against the claw for 3 s.

Bottom Line: Crayfish showed no difference in behavioural response to low temperature stimuli.Crayfish also showed no significant changes in behaviour when stimulated with capsaicin or isothiocyanate compared to controls, and neurons in the antenna did not change their firing rate following application of capsaicin or isothiocyanate.Noxious high temperatures appear to be a potentially ecologically relevant noxious stimulus for crayfish that can be detected by sensory neurons, which may be specialized nociceptors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78539, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus