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Social media as a sensor of air quality and public response in China.

Wang S, Paul MJ, Dredze M - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Our qualitative results found that 67.1% (114/170) of messages were relevant to air quality and of those, 78.9% (90/114) were a firsthand report.Of firsthand reports, 28% (32/90) indicated a reactive behavior and 19% (17/90) expressed a health concern.Social media data can augment existing air pollution surveillance data, especially perception and health-related data that traditionally requires expensive surveys or interviews.

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Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University, Department of Computer Science, Baltimore, MD, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of social media data sources for a wide range of public health goals, including disease surveillance, mental health trends, and health perceptions and sentiment. Most such research has focused on English-language social media for the task of disease surveillance.

Objective: We investigated the value of Chinese social media for monitoring air quality trends and related public perceptions and response. The goal was to determine if this data is suitable for learning actionable information about pollution levels and public response.

Methods: We mined a collection of 93 million messages from Sina Weibo, China's largest microblogging service. We experimented with different filters to identify messages relevant to air quality, based on keyword matching and topic modeling. We evaluated the reliability of the data filters by comparing message volume per city to air particle pollution rates obtained from the Chinese government for 74 cities. Additionally, we performed a qualitative study of the content of pollution-related messages by coding a sample of 170 messages for relevance to air quality, and whether the message included details such as a reactive behavior or a health concern.

Results: The volume of pollution-related messages is highly correlated with particle pollution levels, with Pearson correlation values up to .718 (n=74, P<.001). Our qualitative results found that 67.1% (114/170) of messages were relevant to air quality and of those, 78.9% (90/114) were a firsthand report. Of firsthand reports, 28% (32/90) indicated a reactive behavior and 19% (17/90) expressed a health concern. Additionally, 3 messages of 170 requested that action be taken to improve quality.

Conclusions: We have found quantitatively that message volume in Sina Weibo is indicative of true particle pollution levels, and we have found qualitatively that messages contain rich details including perceptions, behaviors, and self-reported health effects. Social media data can augment existing air pollution surveillance data, especially perception and health-related data that traditionally requires expensive surveys or interviews.

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Summary of annotation results on sample of 170 messages. Tree structure indicates which codes are dependent on their parent codes. Different branches are not mutually exclusive.
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figure3: Summary of annotation results on sample of 170 messages. Tree structure indicates which codes are dependent on their parent codes. Different branches are not mutually exclusive.

Mentions: These results are summarized in Figure 3. We found that 114 (67.1%) messages sampled through this filter were actually relevant to air quality or air pollution. Of those 114 messages, 90 indicated a firsthand experience (79.0%). Of those 90 messages, 32 (36%) mentioned a reactive behavior, and 17 (19%) expressed a concern for the user’s health.


Social media as a sensor of air quality and public response in China.

Wang S, Paul MJ, Dredze M - J. Med. Internet Res. (2015)

Summary of annotation results on sample of 170 messages. Tree structure indicates which codes are dependent on their parent codes. Different branches are not mutually exclusive.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400579&req=5

figure3: Summary of annotation results on sample of 170 messages. Tree structure indicates which codes are dependent on their parent codes. Different branches are not mutually exclusive.
Mentions: These results are summarized in Figure 3. We found that 114 (67.1%) messages sampled through this filter were actually relevant to air quality or air pollution. Of those 114 messages, 90 indicated a firsthand experience (79.0%). Of those 90 messages, 32 (36%) mentioned a reactive behavior, and 17 (19%) expressed a concern for the user’s health.

Bottom Line: Our qualitative results found that 67.1% (114/170) of messages were relevant to air quality and of those, 78.9% (90/114) were a firsthand report.Of firsthand reports, 28% (32/90) indicated a reactive behavior and 19% (17/90) expressed a health concern.Social media data can augment existing air pollution surveillance data, especially perception and health-related data that traditionally requires expensive surveys or interviews.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University, Department of Computer Science, Baltimore, MD, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of social media data sources for a wide range of public health goals, including disease surveillance, mental health trends, and health perceptions and sentiment. Most such research has focused on English-language social media for the task of disease surveillance.

Objective: We investigated the value of Chinese social media for monitoring air quality trends and related public perceptions and response. The goal was to determine if this data is suitable for learning actionable information about pollution levels and public response.

Methods: We mined a collection of 93 million messages from Sina Weibo, China's largest microblogging service. We experimented with different filters to identify messages relevant to air quality, based on keyword matching and topic modeling. We evaluated the reliability of the data filters by comparing message volume per city to air particle pollution rates obtained from the Chinese government for 74 cities. Additionally, we performed a qualitative study of the content of pollution-related messages by coding a sample of 170 messages for relevance to air quality, and whether the message included details such as a reactive behavior or a health concern.

Results: The volume of pollution-related messages is highly correlated with particle pollution levels, with Pearson correlation values up to .718 (n=74, P<.001). Our qualitative results found that 67.1% (114/170) of messages were relevant to air quality and of those, 78.9% (90/114) were a firsthand report. Of firsthand reports, 28% (32/90) indicated a reactive behavior and 19% (17/90) expressed a health concern. Additionally, 3 messages of 170 requested that action be taken to improve quality.

Conclusions: We have found quantitatively that message volume in Sina Weibo is indicative of true particle pollution levels, and we have found qualitatively that messages contain rich details including perceptions, behaviors, and self-reported health effects. Social media data can augment existing air pollution surveillance data, especially perception and health-related data that traditionally requires expensive surveys or interviews.

Show MeSH