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Three new species of woodlizards (Hoplocercinae, Enyalioides) from northwestern South America.

Torres-Carvajal O, Venegas PJ, de Queiroz K - Zookeys (2015)

Bottom Line: Enyalioidessophiarothschildae sp. n. is from the Amazonian slopes of the Cordillera Central in northeastern Peru; it differs from other species of Enyalioides in having caudal scales that are relatively homogeneous in size on each caudal segment, a white gular region with a black medial patch and several turquoise scales in males, as well as immaculate white labials and chin.A molecular phylogenetic tree of 18 species of hoplocercines is presented, including the three species described in this paper and Enyalioidescofanorum, as well as an updated identification key for species of Hoplocercinae.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museo de Zoología, Escuela de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Avenida 12 de Octubre y Roca, Apartado 17-01-2184, Quito-Ecuador ; Department of Vertebrate Zoology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, MRC 162, Washington, DC 20560, USA.

ABSTRACT
The discovery of three new species of Enyalioides from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and northern Peru is reported. Enyalioidesaltotambo sp. n. occurs in northwestern Ecuador and differs from other species of Enyalioides in having dorsal scales that are both smooth and homogeneous in size, a brown iris, and in lacking enlarged, circular and keeled scales on the flanks. Enyalioidesanisolepis sp. n. occurs on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes in southern Ecuador and northern Peru and can be distinguished from other species of Enyalioides by its scattered, projecting large scales on the dorsum, flanks, and hind limbs, as well as a well-developed vertebral crest, with the vertebrals on the neck at least three times higher than those between the hind limbs. Enyalioidessophiarothschildae sp. n. is from the Amazonian slopes of the Cordillera Central in northeastern Peru; it differs from other species of Enyalioides in having caudal scales that are relatively homogeneous in size on each caudal segment, a white gular region with a black medial patch and several turquoise scales in males, as well as immaculate white labials and chin. A molecular phylogenetic tree of 18 species of hoplocercines is presented, including the three species described in this paper and Enyalioidescofanorum, as well as an updated identification key for species of Hoplocercinae.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Close-up of left dorsum of Enyalioidesanisolepis (QCAZ 12537, holotype) showing scattered enlarged scales. Scale bar = 5 mm. Photograph by Omar Torres-Carvajal.
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Figure 7: Close-up of left dorsum of Enyalioidesanisolepis (QCAZ 12537, holotype) showing scattered enlarged scales. Scale bar = 5 mm. Photograph by Omar Torres-Carvajal.

Mentions: Enyalioidesanisolepis can be distinguished from other species of Enyalioides, except for Enyalioidesheterolepis, by having conical dorsal head scales (only in Enyalioidesanisolepis and Enyalioidesheterolepis) and scattered, projecting, large scales on the dorsum, flanks, and hind limbs (also in Enyalioides/Morunasaurusannularis and Enyalioides/Morunasaurusgroi), which are conspicuous in adults of both sexes (Fig. 7). Besides occurring on opposite sides of the Andes, Enyalioidesanisolepis differs from Enyalioidesheterolepis (character states from Torres-Carvajal et al. 2011 in parentheses) in having fewer vertebral scales, 43–62, 50.87 ± 6.27 (52–98, 74.61 ± 10.39), a higher vertebral crest with the vertebrals on neck at least three times higher than those between the hind limbs (vertebrals on neck maximum twice as high as those between hind limbs), scattered dark spots on belly in juveniles and adults of both sexes (belly without scattered dark spots, blackish medially in some adult males), tail in adult males moderately compressed laterally (strongly compressed), and a marked sexual dichromatism (Fig. 6), with the dorsal background color greenish in males and brownish in females (both sexes with a brownish background).


Three new species of woodlizards (Hoplocercinae, Enyalioides) from northwestern South America.

Torres-Carvajal O, Venegas PJ, de Queiroz K - Zookeys (2015)

Close-up of left dorsum of Enyalioidesanisolepis (QCAZ 12537, holotype) showing scattered enlarged scales. Scale bar = 5 mm. Photograph by Omar Torres-Carvajal.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400379&req=5

Figure 7: Close-up of left dorsum of Enyalioidesanisolepis (QCAZ 12537, holotype) showing scattered enlarged scales. Scale bar = 5 mm. Photograph by Omar Torres-Carvajal.
Mentions: Enyalioidesanisolepis can be distinguished from other species of Enyalioides, except for Enyalioidesheterolepis, by having conical dorsal head scales (only in Enyalioidesanisolepis and Enyalioidesheterolepis) and scattered, projecting, large scales on the dorsum, flanks, and hind limbs (also in Enyalioides/Morunasaurusannularis and Enyalioides/Morunasaurusgroi), which are conspicuous in adults of both sexes (Fig. 7). Besides occurring on opposite sides of the Andes, Enyalioidesanisolepis differs from Enyalioidesheterolepis (character states from Torres-Carvajal et al. 2011 in parentheses) in having fewer vertebral scales, 43–62, 50.87 ± 6.27 (52–98, 74.61 ± 10.39), a higher vertebral crest with the vertebrals on neck at least three times higher than those between the hind limbs (vertebrals on neck maximum twice as high as those between hind limbs), scattered dark spots on belly in juveniles and adults of both sexes (belly without scattered dark spots, blackish medially in some adult males), tail in adult males moderately compressed laterally (strongly compressed), and a marked sexual dichromatism (Fig. 6), with the dorsal background color greenish in males and brownish in females (both sexes with a brownish background).

Bottom Line: Enyalioidessophiarothschildae sp. n. is from the Amazonian slopes of the Cordillera Central in northeastern Peru; it differs from other species of Enyalioides in having caudal scales that are relatively homogeneous in size on each caudal segment, a white gular region with a black medial patch and several turquoise scales in males, as well as immaculate white labials and chin.A molecular phylogenetic tree of 18 species of hoplocercines is presented, including the three species described in this paper and Enyalioidescofanorum, as well as an updated identification key for species of Hoplocercinae.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museo de Zoología, Escuela de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Avenida 12 de Octubre y Roca, Apartado 17-01-2184, Quito-Ecuador ; Department of Vertebrate Zoology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, MRC 162, Washington, DC 20560, USA.

ABSTRACT
The discovery of three new species of Enyalioides from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and northern Peru is reported. Enyalioidesaltotambo sp. n. occurs in northwestern Ecuador and differs from other species of Enyalioides in having dorsal scales that are both smooth and homogeneous in size, a brown iris, and in lacking enlarged, circular and keeled scales on the flanks. Enyalioidesanisolepis sp. n. occurs on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes in southern Ecuador and northern Peru and can be distinguished from other species of Enyalioides by its scattered, projecting large scales on the dorsum, flanks, and hind limbs, as well as a well-developed vertebral crest, with the vertebrals on the neck at least three times higher than those between the hind limbs. Enyalioidessophiarothschildae sp. n. is from the Amazonian slopes of the Cordillera Central in northeastern Peru; it differs from other species of Enyalioides in having caudal scales that are relatively homogeneous in size on each caudal segment, a white gular region with a black medial patch and several turquoise scales in males, as well as immaculate white labials and chin. A molecular phylogenetic tree of 18 species of hoplocercines is presented, including the three species described in this paper and Enyalioidescofanorum, as well as an updated identification key for species of Hoplocercinae.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus