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The role of health care experience and consumer information efficacy in shaping privacy and security perceptions of medical records: national consumer survey results.

Patel V, Beckjord E, Moser RP, Hughes P, Hesse BW - JMIR Med Inform (2015)

Bottom Line: Approximately one-quarter of American adults (weighted n=235,217,323; unweighted n=3959) indicated they were very confident (n=989) and approximately half indicated they were somewhat confident (n=1597) in the privacy of their medical records; we found similar results regarding adults' confidence in the security of medical records (very confident: n=828; somewhat confident: n=1742).Individuals' perceptions of whether their providers use an EHR was not associated with any privacy or security outcomes.Given that positive health care experiences and higher information efficacy were associated with more favorable perceptions of privacy and security, efforts should continue to encourage providers to secure medical records, provide patients with a "meaningful choice" in how their data are shared, and enable individuals to access information they need to manage their care.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, Washington, DC, United States. vaishali.patel@hhs.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: Providers' adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is increasing and consumers have expressed concerns about the potential effects of EHRs on privacy and security. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding regarding factors that affect individuals' perceptions regarding the privacy and security of their medical information.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe national perceptions regarding the privacy and security of medical records and identify a comprehensive set of factors associated with these perceptions.

Methods: Using a nationally representative 2011-2012 survey, we reported on adults' perceptions regarding privacy and security of medical records and sharing of health information between providers, and whether adults withheld information from a health care provider due to privacy or security concerns. We used multivariable models to examine the association between these outcomes and sociodemographic characteristics, health and health care experience, information efficacy, and technology-related variables.

Results: Approximately one-quarter of American adults (weighted n=235,217,323; unweighted n=3959) indicated they were very confident (n=989) and approximately half indicated they were somewhat confident (n=1597) in the privacy of their medical records; we found similar results regarding adults' confidence in the security of medical records (very confident: n=828; somewhat confident: n=1742). In all, 12.33% (520/3904) withheld information from a health care provider and 59.06% (2100/3459) expressed concerns about the security of both faxed and electronic health information. Adjusting for other characteristics, adults who reported higher quality of care had significantly greater confidence in the privacy and security of their medical records and were less likely to withhold information from their health care provider due to privacy or security concerns. Adults with higher information efficacy had significantly greater confidence in the privacy and security of medical records and less concern about sharing of health information by both fax and electronic means. Individuals' perceptions of whether their providers use an EHR was not associated with any privacy or security outcomes.

Conclusions: Although most adults are confident in the privacy and security of their medical records, many express concerns regarding sharing of information between providers; a minority report withholding information from their providers due to privacy and security concerns. Whether individuals thought their provider was using an EHR was not associated with negative privacy/security perceptions or withholding, suggesting the transition to EHRs is not associated with negative perceptions regarding the privacy and security of medical information. However, monitoring to see how this evolves will be important. Given that positive health care experiences and higher information efficacy were associated with more favorable perceptions of privacy and security, efforts should continue to encourage providers to secure medical records, provide patients with a "meaningful choice" in how their data are shared, and enable individuals to access information they need to manage their care.

No MeSH data available.


Predicted probability of withholding of information from health care providers due to privacy or security concerns (data source: HINTS 4 Cycle 1, 2011-2012).
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figure3: Predicted probability of withholding of information from health care providers due to privacy or security concerns (data source: HINTS 4 Cycle 1, 2011-2012).

Mentions: A total of 12.33% (520/3904) of adults reported they had kept information from their health care provider because of concerns about the privacy and security of their medical information (Figure 3).


The role of health care experience and consumer information efficacy in shaping privacy and security perceptions of medical records: national consumer survey results.

Patel V, Beckjord E, Moser RP, Hughes P, Hesse BW - JMIR Med Inform (2015)

Predicted probability of withholding of information from health care providers due to privacy or security concerns (data source: HINTS 4 Cycle 1, 2011-2012).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400314&req=5

figure3: Predicted probability of withholding of information from health care providers due to privacy or security concerns (data source: HINTS 4 Cycle 1, 2011-2012).
Mentions: A total of 12.33% (520/3904) of adults reported they had kept information from their health care provider because of concerns about the privacy and security of their medical information (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Approximately one-quarter of American adults (weighted n=235,217,323; unweighted n=3959) indicated they were very confident (n=989) and approximately half indicated they were somewhat confident (n=1597) in the privacy of their medical records; we found similar results regarding adults' confidence in the security of medical records (very confident: n=828; somewhat confident: n=1742).Individuals' perceptions of whether their providers use an EHR was not associated with any privacy or security outcomes.Given that positive health care experiences and higher information efficacy were associated with more favorable perceptions of privacy and security, efforts should continue to encourage providers to secure medical records, provide patients with a "meaningful choice" in how their data are shared, and enable individuals to access information they need to manage their care.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, Washington, DC, United States. vaishali.patel@hhs.gov.

ABSTRACT

Background: Providers' adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is increasing and consumers have expressed concerns about the potential effects of EHRs on privacy and security. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding regarding factors that affect individuals' perceptions regarding the privacy and security of their medical information.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe national perceptions regarding the privacy and security of medical records and identify a comprehensive set of factors associated with these perceptions.

Methods: Using a nationally representative 2011-2012 survey, we reported on adults' perceptions regarding privacy and security of medical records and sharing of health information between providers, and whether adults withheld information from a health care provider due to privacy or security concerns. We used multivariable models to examine the association between these outcomes and sociodemographic characteristics, health and health care experience, information efficacy, and technology-related variables.

Results: Approximately one-quarter of American adults (weighted n=235,217,323; unweighted n=3959) indicated they were very confident (n=989) and approximately half indicated they were somewhat confident (n=1597) in the privacy of their medical records; we found similar results regarding adults' confidence in the security of medical records (very confident: n=828; somewhat confident: n=1742). In all, 12.33% (520/3904) withheld information from a health care provider and 59.06% (2100/3459) expressed concerns about the security of both faxed and electronic health information. Adjusting for other characteristics, adults who reported higher quality of care had significantly greater confidence in the privacy and security of their medical records and were less likely to withhold information from their health care provider due to privacy or security concerns. Adults with higher information efficacy had significantly greater confidence in the privacy and security of medical records and less concern about sharing of health information by both fax and electronic means. Individuals' perceptions of whether their providers use an EHR was not associated with any privacy or security outcomes.

Conclusions: Although most adults are confident in the privacy and security of their medical records, many express concerns regarding sharing of information between providers; a minority report withholding information from their providers due to privacy and security concerns. Whether individuals thought their provider was using an EHR was not associated with negative privacy/security perceptions or withholding, suggesting the transition to EHRs is not associated with negative perceptions regarding the privacy and security of medical information. However, monitoring to see how this evolves will be important. Given that positive health care experiences and higher information efficacy were associated with more favorable perceptions of privacy and security, efforts should continue to encourage providers to secure medical records, provide patients with a "meaningful choice" in how their data are shared, and enable individuals to access information they need to manage their care.

No MeSH data available.