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Molecular survey of bacterial communities associated with bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO) in broilers.

Jiang T, Mandal RK, Wideman RF, Khatiwara A, Pevzner I, Min Kwon Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Relatively little is known about the microbial communities associated with BCO.Rarefaction analysis demonstrated the general tendency that increased severities of BCO lesions were associated with reduced species diversity in both femoral and tibial samples when compared to macroscopically normal samples.These observations suggest that certain bacterial subgroups are preferentially selected in association with the development of BCO lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Poultry Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO) is recognized as an important cause of lameness in commercial broiler chickens (meat-type chickens). Relatively little is known about the microbial communities associated with BCO. This study was conducted to increase our understanding of the microbial factors associated with BCO using a culture-independent approach. Using Illumina sequencing of the hyper-variable region V6 in the 16S rRNA gene, we characterized the bacterial communities in 97 femoral or tibial heads from normal and lame broilers carefully selected to represent diverse variations in age, line, lesion type, floor type, clinical status and bone type. Our in-depth survey based on 14 million assembled sequence reads revealed that complex bacterial communities exist in all samples, including macroscopically normal bones from clinically healthy birds. Overall, Proteobacteria (mean 90.9%) comprised the most common phylum, followed by Firmicutes (6.1%) and Actinobacteria (2.6%), accounting for more than 99% of all reads. Statistical analyses demonstrated that there are differences in bacterial communities in different types of bones (femur vs. tibia), lesion types (macroscopically normal femora or tibiae vs. those with pathognomonic BCO lesions), and among individual birds. This analysis also showed that BCO samples overrepresented genera Staphylococcus, whose species have been frequently isolated in BCO samples in previous studies. Rarefaction analysis demonstrated the general tendency that increased severities of BCO lesions were associated with reduced species diversity in both femoral and tibial samples when compared to macroscopically normal samples. These observations suggest that certain bacterial subgroups are preferentially selected in association with the development of BCO lesions. Understanding the microbial species associated with BCO will identify opportunities for understanding and modulating the pathogenesis of this form of lameness in broilers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of samples using unweighted UniFrac.Unweighted UniFrac was used to generate a matrix of pairwise distances between communities, then a scatterplot was generated from the matrix of distances using Principal Coordinate Analysis. Number = chicken ID, R = right, L = left, F = femur, T = tibia. A. Comparison of 4 samples from the same chicken, which has FHS on both femurs and THN on both tibias. B. Comparison of the samples from different individual chickens. Paired samples from same individual chickens have FHS on femurs and THN on tibias.
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pone.0124403.g010: Comparison of samples using unweighted UniFrac.Unweighted UniFrac was used to generate a matrix of pairwise distances between communities, then a scatterplot was generated from the matrix of distances using Principal Coordinate Analysis. Number = chicken ID, R = right, L = left, F = femur, T = tibia. A. Comparison of 4 samples from the same chicken, which has FHS on both femurs and THN on both tibias. B. Comparison of the samples from different individual chickens. Paired samples from same individual chickens have FHS on femurs and THN on tibias.

Mentions: ANOSIM analyses shows that individual chickens harbored distinctly different bacterial communities (Table 1). Recent research has demonstrated a high degree of inter-individual variability in the composition of bacterial communities at particular locations, such as human skin [59], and the chicken ceca [36]. Principal Coordinate Analysis showed that bacterial communities within the same bird are closely related, suggesting the presence of distinctive selective pressures in different individuals (Fig 10).


Molecular survey of bacterial communities associated with bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO) in broilers.

Jiang T, Mandal RK, Wideman RF, Khatiwara A, Pevzner I, Min Kwon Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Comparison of samples using unweighted UniFrac.Unweighted UniFrac was used to generate a matrix of pairwise distances between communities, then a scatterplot was generated from the matrix of distances using Principal Coordinate Analysis. Number = chicken ID, R = right, L = left, F = femur, T = tibia. A. Comparison of 4 samples from the same chicken, which has FHS on both femurs and THN on both tibias. B. Comparison of the samples from different individual chickens. Paired samples from same individual chickens have FHS on femurs and THN on tibias.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400152&req=5

pone.0124403.g010: Comparison of samples using unweighted UniFrac.Unweighted UniFrac was used to generate a matrix of pairwise distances between communities, then a scatterplot was generated from the matrix of distances using Principal Coordinate Analysis. Number = chicken ID, R = right, L = left, F = femur, T = tibia. A. Comparison of 4 samples from the same chicken, which has FHS on both femurs and THN on both tibias. B. Comparison of the samples from different individual chickens. Paired samples from same individual chickens have FHS on femurs and THN on tibias.
Mentions: ANOSIM analyses shows that individual chickens harbored distinctly different bacterial communities (Table 1). Recent research has demonstrated a high degree of inter-individual variability in the composition of bacterial communities at particular locations, such as human skin [59], and the chicken ceca [36]. Principal Coordinate Analysis showed that bacterial communities within the same bird are closely related, suggesting the presence of distinctive selective pressures in different individuals (Fig 10).

Bottom Line: Relatively little is known about the microbial communities associated with BCO.Rarefaction analysis demonstrated the general tendency that increased severities of BCO lesions were associated with reduced species diversity in both femoral and tibial samples when compared to macroscopically normal samples.These observations suggest that certain bacterial subgroups are preferentially selected in association with the development of BCO lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Poultry Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO) is recognized as an important cause of lameness in commercial broiler chickens (meat-type chickens). Relatively little is known about the microbial communities associated with BCO. This study was conducted to increase our understanding of the microbial factors associated with BCO using a culture-independent approach. Using Illumina sequencing of the hyper-variable region V6 in the 16S rRNA gene, we characterized the bacterial communities in 97 femoral or tibial heads from normal and lame broilers carefully selected to represent diverse variations in age, line, lesion type, floor type, clinical status and bone type. Our in-depth survey based on 14 million assembled sequence reads revealed that complex bacterial communities exist in all samples, including macroscopically normal bones from clinically healthy birds. Overall, Proteobacteria (mean 90.9%) comprised the most common phylum, followed by Firmicutes (6.1%) and Actinobacteria (2.6%), accounting for more than 99% of all reads. Statistical analyses demonstrated that there are differences in bacterial communities in different types of bones (femur vs. tibia), lesion types (macroscopically normal femora or tibiae vs. those with pathognomonic BCO lesions), and among individual birds. This analysis also showed that BCO samples overrepresented genera Staphylococcus, whose species have been frequently isolated in BCO samples in previous studies. Rarefaction analysis demonstrated the general tendency that increased severities of BCO lesions were associated with reduced species diversity in both femoral and tibial samples when compared to macroscopically normal samples. These observations suggest that certain bacterial subgroups are preferentially selected in association with the development of BCO lesions. Understanding the microbial species associated with BCO will identify opportunities for understanding and modulating the pathogenesis of this form of lameness in broilers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus