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Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

Belter JT, Dollar AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries.By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively.We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cross-section view of the robotic components (left) proximal joint of the robot finger, (right) spokes and outer ring of the wheel.1) Solid printed ABS, 2) 1mm channels filled with epoxy, 3) Hollow printed shell filled with epoxy.
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pone.0122915.g011: Cross-section view of the robotic components (left) proximal joint of the robot finger, (right) spokes and outer ring of the wheel.1) Solid printed ABS, 2) 1mm channels filled with epoxy, 3) Hollow printed shell filled with epoxy.

Mentions: Numerous versions of each component were created as a comparison of actual component strength. The first was a solid printed ABS sample printed in the vertical (favorable) direction with solid raster fill. The second sample was created using fill compositing with a 1mm wide channel filled with West Systems 105–206 epoxy placed just inside the entire outer perimeter of the part. For the robotic finger link, the channel was placed far enough away from the surface to maintain features used for grip pad adhesion and connection of a flexure at one end. For the wheel, the channels were placed in both the outer perimeter and spokes. The final test was to fill the entire internal cavity of all three parts with epoxy. Fig 11 shows a cross-section view of the three sample types for the proximal finger link and the wheel. You will notice in the hollow printed shell filled with epoxy, the upper surface was tapered to provide a 30 degree overhang angle since the span was too wide to bridge with the FDM printer.


Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

Belter JT, Dollar AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Cross-section view of the robotic components (left) proximal joint of the robot finger, (right) spokes and outer ring of the wheel.1) Solid printed ABS, 2) 1mm channels filled with epoxy, 3) Hollow printed shell filled with epoxy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400136&req=5

pone.0122915.g011: Cross-section view of the robotic components (left) proximal joint of the robot finger, (right) spokes and outer ring of the wheel.1) Solid printed ABS, 2) 1mm channels filled with epoxy, 3) Hollow printed shell filled with epoxy.
Mentions: Numerous versions of each component were created as a comparison of actual component strength. The first was a solid printed ABS sample printed in the vertical (favorable) direction with solid raster fill. The second sample was created using fill compositing with a 1mm wide channel filled with West Systems 105–206 epoxy placed just inside the entire outer perimeter of the part. For the robotic finger link, the channel was placed far enough away from the surface to maintain features used for grip pad adhesion and connection of a flexure at one end. For the wheel, the channels were placed in both the outer perimeter and spokes. The final test was to fill the entire internal cavity of all three parts with epoxy. Fig 11 shows a cross-section view of the three sample types for the proximal finger link and the wheel. You will notice in the hollow printed shell filled with epoxy, the upper surface was tapered to provide a 30 degree overhang angle since the span was too wide to bridge with the FDM printer.

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries.By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively.We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus