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Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

Belter JT, Dollar AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries.By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively.We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cross-sections of the tested samples including the raw material cast samples, and the solid printed ABS samples.a) West systems 105–206 Epoxy, b) Epoxy filled hollow shell, c) Hexagonal porous infill, d) Insight default sparse infill, e) Designed sparse infill, f) Epoxy filled channels, g) solid printed ABS. All the above images are of 105–206 epoxy but the same samples were made with the IE-3076 urethane with wollastonite additive.
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pone.0122915.g007: Cross-sections of the tested samples including the raw material cast samples, and the solid printed ABS samples.a) West systems 105–206 Epoxy, b) Epoxy filled hollow shell, c) Hexagonal porous infill, d) Insight default sparse infill, e) Designed sparse infill, f) Epoxy filled channels, g) solid printed ABS. All the above images are of 105–206 epoxy but the same samples were made with the IE-3076 urethane with wollastonite additive.

Mentions: Fig 7 shows a cross-section view of the samples that were studied to determine the best material and parameters to strengthen components using fill compositing. Fig 8 shows the flexure stress for samples of solid printed ABS at different orientations, as indicated by the letter label, compared to West Systems 105–206 epoxy resin filled samples made using fill compositing. The small black circle shows the point of 0.2% yield criteria, while the black x, indicates the location of failure for the sample. Bulk samples of epoxy are also shown as a comparison. The data shows an improvement in flexure strength and flexure modulus of epoxy filled shells as compared to all orientations of solid printed ABS. Since the print orientation is known to have a large impact on the overall component strength, we also tested samples printed in the least favorable orientation (printed upright). The results show a 60% improvement in ultimate flexure strength and an improvement in overall flexure stiffness.


Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

Belter JT, Dollar AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Cross-sections of the tested samples including the raw material cast samples, and the solid printed ABS samples.a) West systems 105–206 Epoxy, b) Epoxy filled hollow shell, c) Hexagonal porous infill, d) Insight default sparse infill, e) Designed sparse infill, f) Epoxy filled channels, g) solid printed ABS. All the above images are of 105–206 epoxy but the same samples were made with the IE-3076 urethane with wollastonite additive.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400136&req=5

pone.0122915.g007: Cross-sections of the tested samples including the raw material cast samples, and the solid printed ABS samples.a) West systems 105–206 Epoxy, b) Epoxy filled hollow shell, c) Hexagonal porous infill, d) Insight default sparse infill, e) Designed sparse infill, f) Epoxy filled channels, g) solid printed ABS. All the above images are of 105–206 epoxy but the same samples were made with the IE-3076 urethane with wollastonite additive.
Mentions: Fig 7 shows a cross-section view of the samples that were studied to determine the best material and parameters to strengthen components using fill compositing. Fig 8 shows the flexure stress for samples of solid printed ABS at different orientations, as indicated by the letter label, compared to West Systems 105–206 epoxy resin filled samples made using fill compositing. The small black circle shows the point of 0.2% yield criteria, while the black x, indicates the location of failure for the sample. Bulk samples of epoxy are also shown as a comparison. The data shows an improvement in flexure strength and flexure modulus of epoxy filled shells as compared to all orientations of solid printed ABS. Since the print orientation is known to have a large impact on the overall component strength, we also tested samples printed in the least favorable orientation (printed upright). The results show a 60% improvement in ultimate flexure strength and an improvement in overall flexure stiffness.

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries.By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively.We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus