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Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

Belter JT, Dollar AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries.By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively.We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

ABS material exhibits a large variation in flexure strength based on print orientation and printer parameters.I) upright print with raster infill, II) vertical print with raster infill, III) horizontal print with raster infill, IV) vertical print with multiple contours, V) horizontal print with multiple contours, VI) sparse-fill vertical print, VII) sparse-fill horizontal print.
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pone.0122915.g002: ABS material exhibits a large variation in flexure strength based on print orientation and printer parameters.I) upright print with raster infill, II) vertical print with raster infill, III) horizontal print with raster infill, IV) vertical print with multiple contours, V) horizontal print with multiple contours, VI) sparse-fill vertical print, VII) sparse-fill horizontal print.

Mentions: To verify the effects of FDM print orientation on overall part strength, we conducted three-point bend flexure testing of printed samples. The testing procedure and sample preparation, as shown in Fig 2 (top left), is detailed in the section titled “Flexural Testing of ‘Fill-Composite’ Samples”. All tested samples were printed from ABS-P430 [2], on a Fortus-250m printer. Using the same generic rectangular sample geometry, we used the Insight software (provided by Stratasys) to print in various build orientations relative to the printer build tray. By default, the software builds the part using a single outer contour pass and then an internal raster to fill each sequential layer completely with ABS material. The raster angle of each layer is altered by 90 degrees in an attempt to give a more uniform solid structure. Other options can be selected that allow the internal sections of the part to be printed in a sparse/less dense packing of extrusion paths. The outer contour can also be altered so that the part is printed with multiple contours from the outside of each layer inward which eliminates the need for the raster fill of each layer. The build orientation and extrusion path parameters all affect the orientation of the ABS fibers within the part and therefore have an influence on overall part strength. Although the samples were printed in various orientations, all samples underwent flexure testing in the orientation as demonstrated in Fig 2. A diagram of the printed fiber orientations is also shown to illustrate the difference in the printed samples.


Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

Belter JT, Dollar AM - PLoS ONE (2015)

ABS material exhibits a large variation in flexure strength based on print orientation and printer parameters.I) upright print with raster infill, II) vertical print with raster infill, III) horizontal print with raster infill, IV) vertical print with multiple contours, V) horizontal print with multiple contours, VI) sparse-fill vertical print, VII) sparse-fill horizontal print.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400136&req=5

pone.0122915.g002: ABS material exhibits a large variation in flexure strength based on print orientation and printer parameters.I) upright print with raster infill, II) vertical print with raster infill, III) horizontal print with raster infill, IV) vertical print with multiple contours, V) horizontal print with multiple contours, VI) sparse-fill vertical print, VII) sparse-fill horizontal print.
Mentions: To verify the effects of FDM print orientation on overall part strength, we conducted three-point bend flexure testing of printed samples. The testing procedure and sample preparation, as shown in Fig 2 (top left), is detailed in the section titled “Flexural Testing of ‘Fill-Composite’ Samples”. All tested samples were printed from ABS-P430 [2], on a Fortus-250m printer. Using the same generic rectangular sample geometry, we used the Insight software (provided by Stratasys) to print in various build orientations relative to the printer build tray. By default, the software builds the part using a single outer contour pass and then an internal raster to fill each sequential layer completely with ABS material. The raster angle of each layer is altered by 90 degrees in an attempt to give a more uniform solid structure. Other options can be selected that allow the internal sections of the part to be printed in a sparse/less dense packing of extrusion paths. The outer contour can also be altered so that the part is printed with multiple contours from the outside of each layer inward which eliminates the need for the raster fill of each layer. The build orientation and extrusion path parameters all affect the orientation of the ABS fibers within the part and therefore have an influence on overall part strength. Although the samples were printed in various orientations, all samples underwent flexure testing in the orientation as demonstrated in Fig 2. A diagram of the printed fiber orientations is also shown to illustrate the difference in the printed samples.

Bottom Line: In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries.By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively.We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus