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Breastfeeding and bone mass at the ages of 18 and 30: prospective analysis of live births from the Pelotas (Brazil) 1982 and 1993 cohorts.

Muniz LC, Menezes AM, Assunção MC, Wehrmeister FC, Martínez-Mesa J, Gonçalves H, Domingues MR, Gigante DP, Horta BL, Barros FC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted with two birth cohorts (1982 and 1993) in Pelotas, Southern Brazil.Information on breastfeeding was collected during the first 4 years of life.Among men at the age of 18, BMC and BMD were higher among those breastfed regardless of duration (p=0.032 and p=0.043, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Post-Graduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the effect of total breastfeeding, breastfeeding duration and type of breastfeeding at 3 months of age on bone mass at 18 and 30 years.

Study design: A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted with two birth cohorts (1982 and 1993) in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) at 18 and 30 years of age were obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Information on breastfeeding was collected during the first 4 years of life. Analyses were performed by linear regression and stratified by sex.

Results: A total of 1109 and 3226 participants provided complete information on breastfeeding in early life and bone mass at 18 and 30 years, respectively. No association between breastfeeding and bone mass was observed in women at both ages nor among men at age 30. Among men at the age of 18, BMC and BMD were higher among those breastfed regardless of duration (p=0.032 and p=0.043, respectively).

Conclusions: Despite a very weak positive effect of breastfeeding (yes/no) on BMC and BMD at age 18 in men, most findings pointed to a lack of association between breastfeeding and bone mass until young adulthood.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Description of the 1982 and 1993 Pelotas Birth Cohorts.1 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 72); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 5); losses/refusals or subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 275); 2 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 60); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 11); losses (n = 10); subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 105).
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pone.0122759.g001: Description of the 1982 and 1993 Pelotas Birth Cohorts.1 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 72); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 5); losses/refusals or subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 275); 2 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 60); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 11); losses (n = 10); subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 105).

Mentions: In the present analysis, all participants of the 1982 birth cohort and young adults from a subsample of the 1993 cohort who had complete data on breastfeeding in the first four years of life were included. The subsample from the 1993 cohort included all low birth weight children (<2500g), plus a random sample of 20% of the remaining original cohort [23, 24] (Fig 1).


Breastfeeding and bone mass at the ages of 18 and 30: prospective analysis of live births from the Pelotas (Brazil) 1982 and 1993 cohorts.

Muniz LC, Menezes AM, Assunção MC, Wehrmeister FC, Martínez-Mesa J, Gonçalves H, Domingues MR, Gigante DP, Horta BL, Barros FC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Description of the 1982 and 1993 Pelotas Birth Cohorts.1 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 72); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 5); losses/refusals or subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 275); 2 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 60); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 11); losses (n = 10); subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 105).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400134&req=5

pone.0122759.g001: Description of the 1982 and 1993 Pelotas Birth Cohorts.1 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 72); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 5); losses/refusals or subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 275); 2 Subjects excluded of DXA scan: pregnant or suspected pregnancy (n = 60); individuals in wheelchairs or with osteo-articular disabilities (n = 11); losses (n = 10); subjects with wearing non-removable metallic objects (e.g. screws, earrings or piercings) or extremely obese individuals or those taller than 192 cm (n = 105).
Mentions: In the present analysis, all participants of the 1982 birth cohort and young adults from a subsample of the 1993 cohort who had complete data on breastfeeding in the first four years of life were included. The subsample from the 1993 cohort included all low birth weight children (<2500g), plus a random sample of 20% of the remaining original cohort [23, 24] (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted with two birth cohorts (1982 and 1993) in Pelotas, Southern Brazil.Information on breastfeeding was collected during the first 4 years of life.Among men at the age of 18, BMC and BMD were higher among those breastfed regardless of duration (p=0.032 and p=0.043, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Post-Graduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the effect of total breastfeeding, breastfeeding duration and type of breastfeeding at 3 months of age on bone mass at 18 and 30 years.

Study design: A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted with two birth cohorts (1982 and 1993) in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) at 18 and 30 years of age were obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Information on breastfeeding was collected during the first 4 years of life. Analyses were performed by linear regression and stratified by sex.

Results: A total of 1109 and 3226 participants provided complete information on breastfeeding in early life and bone mass at 18 and 30 years, respectively. No association between breastfeeding and bone mass was observed in women at both ages nor among men at age 30. Among men at the age of 18, BMC and BMD were higher among those breastfed regardless of duration (p=0.032 and p=0.043, respectively).

Conclusions: Despite a very weak positive effect of breastfeeding (yes/no) on BMC and BMD at age 18 in men, most findings pointed to a lack of association between breastfeeding and bone mass until young adulthood.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus