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Aluminium uptake and translocation in Al hyperaccumulator Rumex obtusifolius is affected by low-molecular-weight organic acids content and soil pH.

Vondráčková S, Száková J, Drábek O, Tejnecký V, Hejcman M, Müllerová V, Tlustoš P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Elevated transport of total Al from belowground organs into leaves was recorded in both lime-treated soils and in superphosphate-treated alkaline soil as a result of sufficient amount of Ca available from soil solution as well as from superphosphate that can probably modify distribution of total Al in R. obtusifolius as a representative of "oxalate plants." The highest concentrations of Al and organic acids were recorded in the leaves, followed by the stem and belowground organ infusions.In alkaline soil, R. obtusifolius is an Al-hyperaccumulator with the highest concentrations of oxalate in leaves, of malate in stems, and of citrate in belowground organs.These organic acids form strong complexes with Al that can play a key role in internal Al tolerance but the used methods did not allow us to distinguish the proportion of total Al-organic complexes to the free organic acids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agroenvironmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6, Suchdol, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: High Al resistance of Rumex obtusifolius together with its ability to accumulate Al has never been studied in weakly acidic conditions (pH > 5.8) and is not sufficiently described in real soil conditions. The potential elucidation of the role of organic acids in plant can explain the Al tolerance mechanism.

Methods: We established a pot experiment with R. obtusifolius planted in slightly acidic and alkaline soils. For the manipulation of Al availability, both soils were untreated and treated by lime and superphosphate. We determined mobile Al concentrations in soils and concentrations of Al and organic acids in organs.

Results: Al availability correlated positively to the extraction of organic acids (citric acid < oxalic acid) in soils. Monovalent Al cations were the most abundant mobile Al forms with positive charge in soils. Liming and superphosphate application were ambiguous measures for changing Al mobility in soils. Elevated transport of total Al from belowground organs into leaves was recorded in both lime-treated soils and in superphosphate-treated alkaline soil as a result of sufficient amount of Ca available from soil solution as well as from superphosphate that can probably modify distribution of total Al in R. obtusifolius as a representative of "oxalate plants." The highest concentrations of Al and organic acids were recorded in the leaves, followed by the stem and belowground organ infusions.

Conclusions: In alkaline soil, R. obtusifolius is an Al-hyperaccumulator with the highest concentrations of oxalate in leaves, of malate in stems, and of citrate in belowground organs. These organic acids form strong complexes with Al that can play a key role in internal Al tolerance but the used methods did not allow us to distinguish the proportion of total Al-organic complexes to the free organic acids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of method of determination (HPLC/IC and ICP-OES) on mean concentration of exchangeable and water-soluble forms of Al (total AlKCl and total AlH2O; and Σ Al, all Al forms positively charged) at the end of the experiment.Treatment abbreviations: LC—Litavka control soil without any additive, LCa—Litavka soil with lime, LP—Litavka soil with superphosphate, MC—Malín control soil without any additive, MCa—Malín soil with lime, and MP—Malín soil with superphosphate. Error bars represent SE. Based on Kruskal-Wallis test, differences between methods of determination were significant at 0.05 (*) and 0.01 (**) probability levels. Using multiple comparisons of mean ranks, methods of determination with the same letter were not significantly different.
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pone.0123351.g002: Effect of method of determination (HPLC/IC and ICP-OES) on mean concentration of exchangeable and water-soluble forms of Al (total AlKCl and total AlH2O; and Σ Al, all Al forms positively charged) at the end of the experiment.Treatment abbreviations: LC—Litavka control soil without any additive, LCa—Litavka soil with lime, LP—Litavka soil with superphosphate, MC—Malín control soil without any additive, MCa—Malín soil with lime, and MP—Malín soil with superphosphate. Error bars represent SE. Based on Kruskal-Wallis test, differences between methods of determination were significant at 0.05 (*) and 0.01 (**) probability levels. Using multiple comparisons of mean ranks, methods of determination with the same letter were not significantly different.

Mentions: The difference between concentrations of Σ Al and AlKCl (AlH2O) was significantly affected by the method of determination in all treatments (see Fig 2 for details).


Aluminium uptake and translocation in Al hyperaccumulator Rumex obtusifolius is affected by low-molecular-weight organic acids content and soil pH.

Vondráčková S, Száková J, Drábek O, Tejnecký V, Hejcman M, Müllerová V, Tlustoš P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Effect of method of determination (HPLC/IC and ICP-OES) on mean concentration of exchangeable and water-soluble forms of Al (total AlKCl and total AlH2O; and Σ Al, all Al forms positively charged) at the end of the experiment.Treatment abbreviations: LC—Litavka control soil without any additive, LCa—Litavka soil with lime, LP—Litavka soil with superphosphate, MC—Malín control soil without any additive, MCa—Malín soil with lime, and MP—Malín soil with superphosphate. Error bars represent SE. Based on Kruskal-Wallis test, differences between methods of determination were significant at 0.05 (*) and 0.01 (**) probability levels. Using multiple comparisons of mean ranks, methods of determination with the same letter were not significantly different.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400109&req=5

pone.0123351.g002: Effect of method of determination (HPLC/IC and ICP-OES) on mean concentration of exchangeable and water-soluble forms of Al (total AlKCl and total AlH2O; and Σ Al, all Al forms positively charged) at the end of the experiment.Treatment abbreviations: LC—Litavka control soil without any additive, LCa—Litavka soil with lime, LP—Litavka soil with superphosphate, MC—Malín control soil without any additive, MCa—Malín soil with lime, and MP—Malín soil with superphosphate. Error bars represent SE. Based on Kruskal-Wallis test, differences between methods of determination were significant at 0.05 (*) and 0.01 (**) probability levels. Using multiple comparisons of mean ranks, methods of determination with the same letter were not significantly different.
Mentions: The difference between concentrations of Σ Al and AlKCl (AlH2O) was significantly affected by the method of determination in all treatments (see Fig 2 for details).

Bottom Line: Elevated transport of total Al from belowground organs into leaves was recorded in both lime-treated soils and in superphosphate-treated alkaline soil as a result of sufficient amount of Ca available from soil solution as well as from superphosphate that can probably modify distribution of total Al in R. obtusifolius as a representative of "oxalate plants." The highest concentrations of Al and organic acids were recorded in the leaves, followed by the stem and belowground organ infusions.In alkaline soil, R. obtusifolius is an Al-hyperaccumulator with the highest concentrations of oxalate in leaves, of malate in stems, and of citrate in belowground organs.These organic acids form strong complexes with Al that can play a key role in internal Al tolerance but the used methods did not allow us to distinguish the proportion of total Al-organic complexes to the free organic acids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agroenvironmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6, Suchdol, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: High Al resistance of Rumex obtusifolius together with its ability to accumulate Al has never been studied in weakly acidic conditions (pH > 5.8) and is not sufficiently described in real soil conditions. The potential elucidation of the role of organic acids in plant can explain the Al tolerance mechanism.

Methods: We established a pot experiment with R. obtusifolius planted in slightly acidic and alkaline soils. For the manipulation of Al availability, both soils were untreated and treated by lime and superphosphate. We determined mobile Al concentrations in soils and concentrations of Al and organic acids in organs.

Results: Al availability correlated positively to the extraction of organic acids (citric acid < oxalic acid) in soils. Monovalent Al cations were the most abundant mobile Al forms with positive charge in soils. Liming and superphosphate application were ambiguous measures for changing Al mobility in soils. Elevated transport of total Al from belowground organs into leaves was recorded in both lime-treated soils and in superphosphate-treated alkaline soil as a result of sufficient amount of Ca available from soil solution as well as from superphosphate that can probably modify distribution of total Al in R. obtusifolius as a representative of "oxalate plants." The highest concentrations of Al and organic acids were recorded in the leaves, followed by the stem and belowground organ infusions.

Conclusions: In alkaline soil, R. obtusifolius is an Al-hyperaccumulator with the highest concentrations of oxalate in leaves, of malate in stems, and of citrate in belowground organs. These organic acids form strong complexes with Al that can play a key role in internal Al tolerance but the used methods did not allow us to distinguish the proportion of total Al-organic complexes to the free organic acids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus