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The 'Positive Effect' is present in older Chinese adults: evidence from an eye tracking study.

Wang J, He L, Jia L, Tian J, Benson V - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The 'Positive Effect' is found for older people compared with younger people in western societies and is believed to reflect a preference for positive emotional regulation in older adults.It is not known whether such an effect is Universal, and in East Asian cultures, there is a highly controversial debate concerning this question.In the current experiment we explored whether Chinese older participants showed a 'Positive Effect' when they inspected picture pairs that were either a positive or a negative picture presented with a neutral picture, or a positive and negative picture paired together.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Academy of Psychology and Behaviour, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin, China.

ABSTRACT
The 'Positive Effect' is defined as the phenomenon of preferential cognitive processing of positive affective information, and avoidance or dismissal of negative affective information in the social environment. The 'Positive Effect' is found for older people compared with younger people in western societies and is believed to reflect a preference for positive emotional regulation in older adults. It is not known whether such an effect is Universal, and in East Asian cultures, there is a highly controversial debate concerning this question. In the current experiment we explored whether Chinese older participants showed a 'Positive Effect' when they inspected picture pairs that were either a positive or a negative picture presented with a neutral picture, or a positive and negative picture paired together. The results indicated that both groups of participants showed an attentional bias to both pleasant (more processing of) and unpleasant pictures (initial orienting to) when these were paired with neutral pictures. When pleasant and unpleasant pictures were paired together both groups showed an initial orientation bias for the pleasant picture, but the older participants showed this bias for initial orienting and increased processing measures, providing evidence of a 'Positive Effect' in older Chinese adults.

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The means for the three different eye movement measures, for the three different picture pairings, for the older and younger participants are shown in Fig 2.Panel (a) presents the data for the pleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (b) presents the data for the unpleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (c) presents the data for the pleasant and unpleasant picture pairs. Significance levels are represented as follows—* p <.05, ** p <.01, ***p <.001.
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pone.0121372.g002: The means for the three different eye movement measures, for the three different picture pairings, for the older and younger participants are shown in Fig 2.Panel (a) presents the data for the pleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (b) presents the data for the unpleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (c) presents the data for the pleasant and unpleasant picture pairs. Significance levels are represented as follows—* p <.05, ** p <.01, ***p <.001.

Mentions: For the younger group for there was no difference in First Pass Fixations between the pleasant and unpleasant pictures, younger FP t < 2. Similar to the findings for GD the older group had a greater number of fixations to the pleasant pictures before moving to the unpleasant ones t (1, 25) = 4.54, p <. 001 (pleasant 2.50 vs unpleasant 2.21). Fig 2 shows the eye movement measures for both groups and all three pairings.


The 'Positive Effect' is present in older Chinese adults: evidence from an eye tracking study.

Wang J, He L, Jia L, Tian J, Benson V - PLoS ONE (2015)

The means for the three different eye movement measures, for the three different picture pairings, for the older and younger participants are shown in Fig 2.Panel (a) presents the data for the pleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (b) presents the data for the unpleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (c) presents the data for the pleasant and unpleasant picture pairs. Significance levels are represented as follows—* p <.05, ** p <.01, ***p <.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400038&req=5

pone.0121372.g002: The means for the three different eye movement measures, for the three different picture pairings, for the older and younger participants are shown in Fig 2.Panel (a) presents the data for the pleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (b) presents the data for the unpleasant and neutral picture pairs; Panel (c) presents the data for the pleasant and unpleasant picture pairs. Significance levels are represented as follows—* p <.05, ** p <.01, ***p <.001.
Mentions: For the younger group for there was no difference in First Pass Fixations between the pleasant and unpleasant pictures, younger FP t < 2. Similar to the findings for GD the older group had a greater number of fixations to the pleasant pictures before moving to the unpleasant ones t (1, 25) = 4.54, p <. 001 (pleasant 2.50 vs unpleasant 2.21). Fig 2 shows the eye movement measures for both groups and all three pairings.

Bottom Line: The 'Positive Effect' is found for older people compared with younger people in western societies and is believed to reflect a preference for positive emotional regulation in older adults.It is not known whether such an effect is Universal, and in East Asian cultures, there is a highly controversial debate concerning this question.In the current experiment we explored whether Chinese older participants showed a 'Positive Effect' when they inspected picture pairs that were either a positive or a negative picture presented with a neutral picture, or a positive and negative picture paired together.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Academy of Psychology and Behaviour, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin, China.

ABSTRACT
The 'Positive Effect' is defined as the phenomenon of preferential cognitive processing of positive affective information, and avoidance or dismissal of negative affective information in the social environment. The 'Positive Effect' is found for older people compared with younger people in western societies and is believed to reflect a preference for positive emotional regulation in older adults. It is not known whether such an effect is Universal, and in East Asian cultures, there is a highly controversial debate concerning this question. In the current experiment we explored whether Chinese older participants showed a 'Positive Effect' when they inspected picture pairs that were either a positive or a negative picture presented with a neutral picture, or a positive and negative picture paired together. The results indicated that both groups of participants showed an attentional bias to both pleasant (more processing of) and unpleasant pictures (initial orienting to) when these were paired with neutral pictures. When pleasant and unpleasant pictures were paired together both groups showed an initial orientation bias for the pleasant picture, but the older participants showed this bias for initial orienting and increased processing measures, providing evidence of a 'Positive Effect' in older Chinese adults.

Show MeSH