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Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research: a systematic review of gene expression and protein composition in human tendinopathy.

Sejersen MH, Frost P, Hansen TB, Deutch SR, Svendsen SW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: There was a tendency towards an increase of collagen I (11 of 15 studies) and III (13 of 14), metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (6 of 12), -9 (7 of 7), -13 (4 of 7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12).Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro.Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Danish Ramazzini Centre, Department of Occupational Medicine, Regional Hospital West Jutland-University Research Clinic, Herning, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy including tears is a cause of significant morbidity. The molecular pathogenesis of the disorder is largely unknown. This review aimed to present an overview of the literature on gene expression and protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics--the comprehensive study of protein composition--in tendon research.

Materials and methods: We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included studies on objectively quantified differential gene expression and/or protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies as compared to control tissue.

Results: We identified 2199 studies, of which 54 were included; 25 studies focussed on rotator cuff or biceps tendinopathy. Most of the included studies quantified prespecified mRNA molecules and proteins using polymerase chain reactions and immunoassays, respectively. There was a tendency towards an increase of collagen I (11 of 15 studies) and III (13 of 14), metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (6 of 12), -9 (7 of 7), -13 (4 of 7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12). Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro.

Conclusions: Based on methods, which only allowed simultaneous quantification of a limited number of prespecified mRNA molecules or proteins, several proteins appeared to be differentially expressed/represented in rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies. No proteomics studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria, although proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Direction of change of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) in relation to study size (number of patient samples).Each dot marks the direction of change in MMP-3 in a single study[33,40–42,45,50,59,66,67,73,78,86].
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pone.0119974.g002: Direction of change of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) in relation to study size (number of patient samples).Each dot marks the direction of change in MMP-3 in a single study[33,40–42,45,50,59,66,67,73,78,86].

Mentions: To examine the possibility of publication bias, we plotted the direction of change of MMP-3 content in relation to study size (Fig 2). Since the content of MMP-3 tended to be decreased in tendinopathy, the plot would indicate publication bias if smaller studies tended to report a decrease of MMP-3 in tendinopathy less often than larger studies did. Study size varied from 5 to 116 patient samples; only two studies had a size of >50. Two studies reported both an increase and a decrease in MMP-3 for different comparisons; in these cases, we chose to report only the result from the comparison between patient and control samples[41] and prioritised samples taken from the same anatomical location[51]. One study showed only a borderline decrease in MMP-3[78], but we presented the result as a decrease in the figure. Five studies had a sample size ≤20, of which four reported a lower expression/representation of MMP-3 (80%). Seven studies had sample a size >20, of which six reported a lower expression/representation of MMP-3 (86%). Thus, similar results were reported in small and large studies.


Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research: a systematic review of gene expression and protein composition in human tendinopathy.

Sejersen MH, Frost P, Hansen TB, Deutch SR, Svendsen SW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Direction of change of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) in relation to study size (number of patient samples).Each dot marks the direction of change in MMP-3 in a single study[33,40–42,45,50,59,66,67,73,78,86].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400011&req=5

pone.0119974.g002: Direction of change of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) in relation to study size (number of patient samples).Each dot marks the direction of change in MMP-3 in a single study[33,40–42,45,50,59,66,67,73,78,86].
Mentions: To examine the possibility of publication bias, we plotted the direction of change of MMP-3 content in relation to study size (Fig 2). Since the content of MMP-3 tended to be decreased in tendinopathy, the plot would indicate publication bias if smaller studies tended to report a decrease of MMP-3 in tendinopathy less often than larger studies did. Study size varied from 5 to 116 patient samples; only two studies had a size of >50. Two studies reported both an increase and a decrease in MMP-3 for different comparisons; in these cases, we chose to report only the result from the comparison between patient and control samples[41] and prioritised samples taken from the same anatomical location[51]. One study showed only a borderline decrease in MMP-3[78], but we presented the result as a decrease in the figure. Five studies had a sample size ≤20, of which four reported a lower expression/representation of MMP-3 (80%). Seven studies had sample a size >20, of which six reported a lower expression/representation of MMP-3 (86%). Thus, similar results were reported in small and large studies.

Bottom Line: There was a tendency towards an increase of collagen I (11 of 15 studies) and III (13 of 14), metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (6 of 12), -9 (7 of 7), -13 (4 of 7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12).Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro.Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Danish Ramazzini Centre, Department of Occupational Medicine, Regional Hospital West Jutland-University Research Clinic, Herning, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy including tears is a cause of significant morbidity. The molecular pathogenesis of the disorder is largely unknown. This review aimed to present an overview of the literature on gene expression and protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics--the comprehensive study of protein composition--in tendon research.

Materials and methods: We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included studies on objectively quantified differential gene expression and/or protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies as compared to control tissue.

Results: We identified 2199 studies, of which 54 were included; 25 studies focussed on rotator cuff or biceps tendinopathy. Most of the included studies quantified prespecified mRNA molecules and proteins using polymerase chain reactions and immunoassays, respectively. There was a tendency towards an increase of collagen I (11 of 15 studies) and III (13 of 14), metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 (6 of 12), -9 (7 of 7), -13 (4 of 7), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12). Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro.

Conclusions: Based on methods, which only allowed simultaneous quantification of a limited number of prespecified mRNA molecules or proteins, several proteins appeared to be differentially expressed/represented in rotator cuff tendinopathy and other tendinopathies. No proteomics studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria, although proteomics technologies may be a way to identify protein profiles (including non-prespecified proteins) that characterise specific tendon disorders or stages of tendinopathy. Thus, our results suggested an untapped potential for proteomics in tendon research.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus