Limits...
Response of black-capped chickadees to house finch Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

Dhondt AA, Dhondt KV, Hochachka WM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: All house finches developed severe eye lesions but none of the black-capped chickadees did.Modeling the Rapid Plate Agglutination test results of black-capped chickadees shows that the rate of false-positive tests would be not more than 3.2%, while the estimated rate of false negatives is 55%.We conclude that the proportion of wild-caught individuals in which we detect M. gallisepticum-specific antibodies using Rapid Plate Agglutination is, if anything, substantially underestimated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bird Population Studies, Laboratory of Ornithology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 14850, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Tests for the presence of pathogen DNA or antibodies are routinely used to survey for current or past infections. In diseases that emerge following a host jump estimates of infection rate might be under- or overestimated. We here examine whether observed rates of infection are biased for a non-focal host species in a model system. The bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a widespread pathogen in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus), a fringillid finch, but an unknown proportion of individuals of other songbird species are also infected. Our goal is to determine the extent to which detection of M. gallisepticum DNA or antibodies against the bacteria in a non-fringillid bird species is over- or underestimated using black-capped chickadees Poecile atricapillus, a species in which antibodies against M. gallisepticum are frequently detected in free-living individuals. After keeping black-capped chickadees in captivity for 12 weeks, during which period the birds remained negative for M. gallisepticum, four were inoculated with M. gallisepticum and four were sham inoculated in both eyes to serve as negative controls. Simultaneously we inoculated six house finches with the same isolate of M. gallisepticum as a positive control. All inoculated birds of both species developed infections detectable by qPCR in the conjunctiva. For the 6 weeks following inoculation we detected antibodies in all M. gallisepticum-inoculated house finches but in only three of the four M. gallisepticum-inoculated black-capped chickadees. All house finches developed severe eye lesions but none of the black-capped chickadees did. Modeling the Rapid Plate Agglutination test results of black-capped chickadees shows that the rate of false-positive tests would be not more than 3.2%, while the estimated rate of false negatives is 55%. We conclude that the proportion of wild-caught individuals in which we detect M. gallisepticum-specific antibodies using Rapid Plate Agglutination is, if anything, substantially underestimated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of individuals in which Mycoplasma gallisepticum-specific antibodies were detected using an RPA test after inoculation (on day 0) with a house finch strain of M. gallisepticum in 6 house finches (circles) and 4 black-capped chickadees (squares).The 4 control black-capped chickadees inoculated with Frey’s medium remained negative throughout (not shown). On each date birds were scored as having (1) or not having (0) antibodies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400008&req=5

pone.0124820.g002: Proportion of individuals in which Mycoplasma gallisepticum-specific antibodies were detected using an RPA test after inoculation (on day 0) with a house finch strain of M. gallisepticum in 6 house finches (circles) and 4 black-capped chickadees (squares).The 4 control black-capped chickadees inoculated with Frey’s medium remained negative throughout (not shown). On each date birds were scored as having (1) or not having (0) antibodies.

Mentions: As with levels of detected DNA, sensitivity of antibody tests was greater for house finches than for black-capped chickadees (Fig 2). Antibodies were detected in all house finches from 14 to 42 days post-inoculation. This difference in sensitivity was statistically significant (P<0.0001 for an inoculated × day_post-inoculation × species interaction in a logistic regression).


Response of black-capped chickadees to house finch Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

Dhondt AA, Dhondt KV, Hochachka WM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Proportion of individuals in which Mycoplasma gallisepticum-specific antibodies were detected using an RPA test after inoculation (on day 0) with a house finch strain of M. gallisepticum in 6 house finches (circles) and 4 black-capped chickadees (squares).The 4 control black-capped chickadees inoculated with Frey’s medium remained negative throughout (not shown). On each date birds were scored as having (1) or not having (0) antibodies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4400008&req=5

pone.0124820.g002: Proportion of individuals in which Mycoplasma gallisepticum-specific antibodies were detected using an RPA test after inoculation (on day 0) with a house finch strain of M. gallisepticum in 6 house finches (circles) and 4 black-capped chickadees (squares).The 4 control black-capped chickadees inoculated with Frey’s medium remained negative throughout (not shown). On each date birds were scored as having (1) or not having (0) antibodies.
Mentions: As with levels of detected DNA, sensitivity of antibody tests was greater for house finches than for black-capped chickadees (Fig 2). Antibodies were detected in all house finches from 14 to 42 days post-inoculation. This difference in sensitivity was statistically significant (P<0.0001 for an inoculated × day_post-inoculation × species interaction in a logistic regression).

Bottom Line: All house finches developed severe eye lesions but none of the black-capped chickadees did.Modeling the Rapid Plate Agglutination test results of black-capped chickadees shows that the rate of false-positive tests would be not more than 3.2%, while the estimated rate of false negatives is 55%.We conclude that the proportion of wild-caught individuals in which we detect M. gallisepticum-specific antibodies using Rapid Plate Agglutination is, if anything, substantially underestimated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bird Population Studies, Laboratory of Ornithology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 14850, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Tests for the presence of pathogen DNA or antibodies are routinely used to survey for current or past infections. In diseases that emerge following a host jump estimates of infection rate might be under- or overestimated. We here examine whether observed rates of infection are biased for a non-focal host species in a model system. The bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a widespread pathogen in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus), a fringillid finch, but an unknown proportion of individuals of other songbird species are also infected. Our goal is to determine the extent to which detection of M. gallisepticum DNA or antibodies against the bacteria in a non-fringillid bird species is over- or underestimated using black-capped chickadees Poecile atricapillus, a species in which antibodies against M. gallisepticum are frequently detected in free-living individuals. After keeping black-capped chickadees in captivity for 12 weeks, during which period the birds remained negative for M. gallisepticum, four were inoculated with M. gallisepticum and four were sham inoculated in both eyes to serve as negative controls. Simultaneously we inoculated six house finches with the same isolate of M. gallisepticum as a positive control. All inoculated birds of both species developed infections detectable by qPCR in the conjunctiva. For the 6 weeks following inoculation we detected antibodies in all M. gallisepticum-inoculated house finches but in only three of the four M. gallisepticum-inoculated black-capped chickadees. All house finches developed severe eye lesions but none of the black-capped chickadees did. Modeling the Rapid Plate Agglutination test results of black-capped chickadees shows that the rate of false-positive tests would be not more than 3.2%, while the estimated rate of false negatives is 55%. We conclude that the proportion of wild-caught individuals in which we detect M. gallisepticum-specific antibodies using Rapid Plate Agglutination is, if anything, substantially underestimated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus