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How close we are to achieving commercially viable large-scale photobiological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria: a review of the biological aspects.

Sakurai H, Masukawa H, Kitashima M, Inoue K - Life (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The products of photobiological systems are H2 and O2; the H2 can be used as the energy source of fuel cells, etc., which generate electricity at high efficiencies and minimal pollution, as the waste product is H2O.Overall, production of commercially viable algal fuels in any form, including biomass and biodiesel, is challenging, and the very few systems that are operational have yet to be evaluated.In this paper we will: briefly review some of the necessary conditions for economical production, summarize the reports of photobiological H2 production by cyanobacteria, present our schemes for future production, and discuss the necessity for further progress in the research needed to achieve commercially viable large-scale H2 production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Photobiological Hydrogen Production, Kanagawa University, Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293, Japan. sakurai@waseda.jp.

ABSTRACT
Photobiological production of H2 by cyanobacteria is considered to be an ideal source of renewable energy because the inputs, water and sunlight, are abundant. The products of photobiological systems are H2 and O2; the H2 can be used as the energy source of fuel cells, etc., which generate electricity at high efficiencies and minimal pollution, as the waste product is H2O. Overall, production of commercially viable algal fuels in any form, including biomass and biodiesel, is challenging, and the very few systems that are operational have yet to be evaluated. In this paper we will: briefly review some of the necessary conditions for economical production, summarize the reports of photobiological H2 production by cyanobacteria, present our schemes for future production, and discuss the necessity for further progress in the research needed to achieve commercially viable large-scale H2 production.

No MeSH data available.


Outline of H2 production by mariculture-raised cyanobacteria. Step 1: Cell growth in a transparent plastic bag floating on the sea surface. The bioreactor is filled with air containing CO2; Step 2: H2 production in a photobioreactor composed of three bags (at least one layer is a H2 gas barrier membrane) floating on the sea surface. The spent cells can be used as fish feed [48].
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life-05-00997-f003: Outline of H2 production by mariculture-raised cyanobacteria. Step 1: Cell growth in a transparent plastic bag floating on the sea surface. The bioreactor is filled with air containing CO2; Step 2: H2 production in a photobioreactor composed of three bags (at least one layer is a H2 gas barrier membrane) floating on the sea surface. The spent cells can be used as fish feed [48].

Mentions: We will first describe an outline of our conceptual scheme [44] for large-scale photobiological H2 production by mariculture-raised cyanobacteria. We will then discuss some of the key issues in greater detail. Our scheme is: (1) Production of H2 in large plastic bioreactors consisting of several layers of plastic film; (2) repeated harvesting of crude H2; (3) initial separation of H2 from O2 possibly by gas-selective permeability membranes on factory ships followed by further purification of H2 by pressure-swing adsorption (PSA); and (4) compression or transformation to a form suitable for transportation by ship and storage (Figure 3 and Figure 4).


How close we are to achieving commercially viable large-scale photobiological hydrogen production by cyanobacteria: a review of the biological aspects.

Sakurai H, Masukawa H, Kitashima M, Inoue K - Life (Basel) (2015)

Outline of H2 production by mariculture-raised cyanobacteria. Step 1: Cell growth in a transparent plastic bag floating on the sea surface. The bioreactor is filled with air containing CO2; Step 2: H2 production in a photobioreactor composed of three bags (at least one layer is a H2 gas barrier membrane) floating on the sea surface. The spent cells can be used as fish feed [48].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390889&req=5

life-05-00997-f003: Outline of H2 production by mariculture-raised cyanobacteria. Step 1: Cell growth in a transparent plastic bag floating on the sea surface. The bioreactor is filled with air containing CO2; Step 2: H2 production in a photobioreactor composed of three bags (at least one layer is a H2 gas barrier membrane) floating on the sea surface. The spent cells can be used as fish feed [48].
Mentions: We will first describe an outline of our conceptual scheme [44] for large-scale photobiological H2 production by mariculture-raised cyanobacteria. We will then discuss some of the key issues in greater detail. Our scheme is: (1) Production of H2 in large plastic bioreactors consisting of several layers of plastic film; (2) repeated harvesting of crude H2; (3) initial separation of H2 from O2 possibly by gas-selective permeability membranes on factory ships followed by further purification of H2 by pressure-swing adsorption (PSA); and (4) compression or transformation to a form suitable for transportation by ship and storage (Figure 3 and Figure 4).

Bottom Line: The products of photobiological systems are H2 and O2; the H2 can be used as the energy source of fuel cells, etc., which generate electricity at high efficiencies and minimal pollution, as the waste product is H2O.Overall, production of commercially viable algal fuels in any form, including biomass and biodiesel, is challenging, and the very few systems that are operational have yet to be evaluated.In this paper we will: briefly review some of the necessary conditions for economical production, summarize the reports of photobiological H2 production by cyanobacteria, present our schemes for future production, and discuss the necessity for further progress in the research needed to achieve commercially viable large-scale H2 production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Photobiological Hydrogen Production, Kanagawa University, Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293, Japan. sakurai@waseda.jp.

ABSTRACT
Photobiological production of H2 by cyanobacteria is considered to be an ideal source of renewable energy because the inputs, water and sunlight, are abundant. The products of photobiological systems are H2 and O2; the H2 can be used as the energy source of fuel cells, etc., which generate electricity at high efficiencies and minimal pollution, as the waste product is H2O. Overall, production of commercially viable algal fuels in any form, including biomass and biodiesel, is challenging, and the very few systems that are operational have yet to be evaluated. In this paper we will: briefly review some of the necessary conditions for economical production, summarize the reports of photobiological H2 production by cyanobacteria, present our schemes for future production, and discuss the necessity for further progress in the research needed to achieve commercially viable large-scale H2 production.

No MeSH data available.