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From vesicles to protocells: the roles of amphiphilic molecules.

Sakuma Y, Imai M - Life (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies.Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures) and the phase separation.This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578, Japan. sakuma@bio.phys.tohoku.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures) and the phase separation. This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the hemifusion of binary GUVs composed of inverse-cone-shaped lipids (green) and cylinder-shaped lipids (blue).
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life-05-00651-f012: Schematic representation of the hemifusion of binary GUVs composed of inverse-cone-shaped lipids (green) and cylinder-shaped lipids (blue).

Mentions: Here, we demonstrate the hemifusion of vesicles using binary GUVs composed of inverse-cone- and cylinder-shaped lipids [48]. Through phase separation, the binary vesicles form domains that are rich in the inverse-cone shape lipids. In the outer leaflet of the domains, the inverse-cone-shaped lipids are in a highly stressed state due to the geometrical mismatch. When the two phase-separated vesicles are brought into contact, the two apposed monolayers in the domains might merge and develop into the stalk [54,55] using the spontaneous curvature, as shown in Figure 12.


From vesicles to protocells: the roles of amphiphilic molecules.

Sakuma Y, Imai M - Life (Basel) (2015)

Schematic representation of the hemifusion of binary GUVs composed of inverse-cone-shaped lipids (green) and cylinder-shaped lipids (blue).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390873&req=5

life-05-00651-f012: Schematic representation of the hemifusion of binary GUVs composed of inverse-cone-shaped lipids (green) and cylinder-shaped lipids (blue).
Mentions: Here, we demonstrate the hemifusion of vesicles using binary GUVs composed of inverse-cone- and cylinder-shaped lipids [48]. Through phase separation, the binary vesicles form domains that are rich in the inverse-cone shape lipids. In the outer leaflet of the domains, the inverse-cone-shaped lipids are in a highly stressed state due to the geometrical mismatch. When the two phase-separated vesicles are brought into contact, the two apposed monolayers in the domains might merge and develop into the stalk [54,55] using the spontaneous curvature, as shown in Figure 12.

Bottom Line: It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies.Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures) and the phase separation.This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578, Japan. sakuma@bio.phys.tohoku.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures) and the phase separation. This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus