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Regulation of CO2 Concentrating Mechanism in Cyanobacteria.

Burnap RL, Hagemann M, Kaplan A - Life (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The structural components for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are described and the progress towards elucidating their regulation is discussed in the context of studies, which have documented metabolomic changes in response to changes in Ci availability.Genes for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are regulated by transcriptional regulators that are in the LysR-transcriptional regulator family and are known to act in concert with small molecule effectors, which appear to be well-known metabolites.Finally, emerging evidence for an additional layer of regulatory complexity involving small non-coding RNAs is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Henry Bellmon Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA. rob.burnap@okstate.edu.

ABSTRACT
In this chapter, we mainly focus on the acclimation of cyanobacteria to the changing ambient CO2 and discuss mechanisms of inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation among the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. The structural components for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are described and the progress towards elucidating their regulation is discussed in the context of studies, which have documented metabolomic changes in response to changes in Ci availability. Genes for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are regulated by transcriptional regulators that are in the LysR-transcriptional regulator family and are known to act in concert with small molecule effectors, which appear to be well-known metabolites. Signals that trigger changes in gene expression and enzyme activity correspond to specific "regulatory metabolites" whose concentrations depend on the ambient Ci availability. Finally, emerging evidence for an additional layer of regulatory complexity involving small non-coding RNAs is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM).
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life-05-00348-f001: Schematic representation of the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM).

Mentions: Many constituents are involved in the operation of the cyanobacterial CCM. Generally speaking, these components may be grouped according to those involved in the intracellular accumulation of Ci, including the entities engaged in CO2 uptake and bicarbonate transport, and those taking part in CO2 elevation and consumption within the carboxysomes (Figure 1).


Regulation of CO2 Concentrating Mechanism in Cyanobacteria.

Burnap RL, Hagemann M, Kaplan A - Life (Basel) (2015)

Schematic representation of the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390856&req=5

life-05-00348-f001: Schematic representation of the cyanobacterial CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM).
Mentions: Many constituents are involved in the operation of the cyanobacterial CCM. Generally speaking, these components may be grouped according to those involved in the intracellular accumulation of Ci, including the entities engaged in CO2 uptake and bicarbonate transport, and those taking part in CO2 elevation and consumption within the carboxysomes (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The structural components for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are described and the progress towards elucidating their regulation is discussed in the context of studies, which have documented metabolomic changes in response to changes in Ci availability.Genes for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are regulated by transcriptional regulators that are in the LysR-transcriptional regulator family and are known to act in concert with small molecule effectors, which appear to be well-known metabolites.Finally, emerging evidence for an additional layer of regulatory complexity involving small non-coding RNAs is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Henry Bellmon Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA. rob.burnap@okstate.edu.

ABSTRACT
In this chapter, we mainly focus on the acclimation of cyanobacteria to the changing ambient CO2 and discuss mechanisms of inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation among the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. The structural components for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are described and the progress towards elucidating their regulation is discussed in the context of studies, which have documented metabolomic changes in response to changes in Ci availability. Genes for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are regulated by transcriptional regulators that are in the LysR-transcriptional regulator family and are known to act in concert with small molecule effectors, which appear to be well-known metabolites. Signals that trigger changes in gene expression and enzyme activity correspond to specific "regulatory metabolites" whose concentrations depend on the ambient Ci availability. Finally, emerging evidence for an additional layer of regulatory complexity involving small non-coding RNAs is discussed.

No MeSH data available.