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Sucrose in cyanobacteria: from a salt-response molecule to play a key role in nitrogen fixation.

Kolman MA, Nishi CN, Perez-Cenci M, Salerno GL - Life (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: In those prokaryotes, sucrose accumulation has been associated with salt acclimation, and considered as a compatible solute in low-salt tolerant strains.In the last years, functional characterizations of sucrose metabolizing enzymes, metabolic control analysis, cellular localization of gene expressions, and reverse genetic experiments have revealed that sucrose metabolism is crucial in the diazotrophic growth of heterocystic strains, and besides, that it can be connected to glycogen synthesis.This article briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge of sucrose physiological functions in modern cyanobacteria and how they might have evolved taking into account the phylogenetic analyses of sucrose enzymes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Biotecnología (INBIOTEC-CONICET) and Fundación para Investigaciones Biológicas Aplicadas (FIBA), Mar del Plata B7600DHN, Argentina. mkolman@fiba.org.ar.

ABSTRACT
In the biosphere, sucrose is mainly synthesized in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, green algae and land plants, as part of the carbon dioxide assimilation pathway. Even though its central position in the functional biology of plants is well documented, much less is known about the role of sucrose in cyanobacteria. In those prokaryotes, sucrose accumulation has been associated with salt acclimation, and considered as a compatible solute in low-salt tolerant strains. In the last years, functional characterizations of sucrose metabolizing enzymes, metabolic control analysis, cellular localization of gene expressions, and reverse genetic experiments have revealed that sucrose metabolism is crucial in the diazotrophic growth of heterocystic strains, and besides, that it can be connected to glycogen synthesis. This article briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge of sucrose physiological functions in modern cyanobacteria and how they might have evolved taking into account the phylogenetic analyses of sucrose enzymes.

No MeSH data available.


Phylogenetic analysis of SPS, SPP and SuS proteins based on GTD and PHD sequences. Homologs were retrieved from public databases (JGI-DOE, http://www.jgi.doe.gov) by BLASTp searches using as query SPS and SuS of Anabaena sp PCC 7120, and SPS and SPP of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Unrooted dendrograms were obtained using the maximum parsimony (1000 replicates). After sequence alignments, GTD (A) or PHD (B) regions described by Cumino et al. [19] were identified with ClustalW [30]. Trees were generated with the MEGA5 software [31]. Major groups are identified to give clues about their function, species, or taxonomic information: (A) GTDs corresponding to bidomainal and unidomainal SPSs and SuS; (B) PHDs, corresponding to SPP and to bidomainal SPSs. Cyanobacteria, blue lines; plants, green lines; bacteria, grey lines. Bootstrap results are not shown when values were lower than 90%.
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life-05-00102-f003: Phylogenetic analysis of SPS, SPP and SuS proteins based on GTD and PHD sequences. Homologs were retrieved from public databases (JGI-DOE, http://www.jgi.doe.gov) by BLASTp searches using as query SPS and SuS of Anabaena sp PCC 7120, and SPS and SPP of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Unrooted dendrograms were obtained using the maximum parsimony (1000 replicates). After sequence alignments, GTD (A) or PHD (B) regions described by Cumino et al. [19] were identified with ClustalW [30]. Trees were generated with the MEGA5 software [31]. Major groups are identified to give clues about their function, species, or taxonomic information: (A) GTDs corresponding to bidomainal and unidomainal SPSs and SuS; (B) PHDs, corresponding to SPP and to bidomainal SPSs. Cyanobacteria, blue lines; plants, green lines; bacteria, grey lines. Bootstrap results are not shown when values were lower than 90%.

Mentions: Earlier phylogenetic analyses based on GTD and PHD sequences revealed that sucrose biosynthesis proteins might have arisen from primordial functional domains shuffled during evolution [9], which was corroborated using sequences from 191 genomes available in May 2014 (Figure 3). The ancestral origin of sucrose metabolism postulated by Salerno and Curatti [9] was strongly supported by a recent study using ancestral sequence reconstruction coupled with phylogenetic analysis of sucrose synthesis genes [28]. In this report, it was hypothesized that sucrose synthesis in algae (chlorophytes and streptophytes) and land plants was likely inherited from cyanobacteria, and the chloroplast ancestor likely had the ability to synthesize sucrose [28,29]. However, sucrose metabolism genes were transferred to the nucleus, giving rise to a novel pathway in the plant lineage [9].


Sucrose in cyanobacteria: from a salt-response molecule to play a key role in nitrogen fixation.

Kolman MA, Nishi CN, Perez-Cenci M, Salerno GL - Life (Basel) (2015)

Phylogenetic analysis of SPS, SPP and SuS proteins based on GTD and PHD sequences. Homologs were retrieved from public databases (JGI-DOE, http://www.jgi.doe.gov) by BLASTp searches using as query SPS and SuS of Anabaena sp PCC 7120, and SPS and SPP of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Unrooted dendrograms were obtained using the maximum parsimony (1000 replicates). After sequence alignments, GTD (A) or PHD (B) regions described by Cumino et al. [19] were identified with ClustalW [30]. Trees were generated with the MEGA5 software [31]. Major groups are identified to give clues about their function, species, or taxonomic information: (A) GTDs corresponding to bidomainal and unidomainal SPSs and SuS; (B) PHDs, corresponding to SPP and to bidomainal SPSs. Cyanobacteria, blue lines; plants, green lines; bacteria, grey lines. Bootstrap results are not shown when values were lower than 90%.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390843&req=5

life-05-00102-f003: Phylogenetic analysis of SPS, SPP and SuS proteins based on GTD and PHD sequences. Homologs were retrieved from public databases (JGI-DOE, http://www.jgi.doe.gov) by BLASTp searches using as query SPS and SuS of Anabaena sp PCC 7120, and SPS and SPP of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Unrooted dendrograms were obtained using the maximum parsimony (1000 replicates). After sequence alignments, GTD (A) or PHD (B) regions described by Cumino et al. [19] were identified with ClustalW [30]. Trees were generated with the MEGA5 software [31]. Major groups are identified to give clues about their function, species, or taxonomic information: (A) GTDs corresponding to bidomainal and unidomainal SPSs and SuS; (B) PHDs, corresponding to SPP and to bidomainal SPSs. Cyanobacteria, blue lines; plants, green lines; bacteria, grey lines. Bootstrap results are not shown when values were lower than 90%.
Mentions: Earlier phylogenetic analyses based on GTD and PHD sequences revealed that sucrose biosynthesis proteins might have arisen from primordial functional domains shuffled during evolution [9], which was corroborated using sequences from 191 genomes available in May 2014 (Figure 3). The ancestral origin of sucrose metabolism postulated by Salerno and Curatti [9] was strongly supported by a recent study using ancestral sequence reconstruction coupled with phylogenetic analysis of sucrose synthesis genes [28]. In this report, it was hypothesized that sucrose synthesis in algae (chlorophytes and streptophytes) and land plants was likely inherited from cyanobacteria, and the chloroplast ancestor likely had the ability to synthesize sucrose [28,29]. However, sucrose metabolism genes were transferred to the nucleus, giving rise to a novel pathway in the plant lineage [9].

Bottom Line: In those prokaryotes, sucrose accumulation has been associated with salt acclimation, and considered as a compatible solute in low-salt tolerant strains.In the last years, functional characterizations of sucrose metabolizing enzymes, metabolic control analysis, cellular localization of gene expressions, and reverse genetic experiments have revealed that sucrose metabolism is crucial in the diazotrophic growth of heterocystic strains, and besides, that it can be connected to glycogen synthesis.This article briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge of sucrose physiological functions in modern cyanobacteria and how they might have evolved taking into account the phylogenetic analyses of sucrose enzymes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Biotecnología (INBIOTEC-CONICET) and Fundación para Investigaciones Biológicas Aplicadas (FIBA), Mar del Plata B7600DHN, Argentina. mkolman@fiba.org.ar.

ABSTRACT
In the biosphere, sucrose is mainly synthesized in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, green algae and land plants, as part of the carbon dioxide assimilation pathway. Even though its central position in the functional biology of plants is well documented, much less is known about the role of sucrose in cyanobacteria. In those prokaryotes, sucrose accumulation has been associated with salt acclimation, and considered as a compatible solute in low-salt tolerant strains. In the last years, functional characterizations of sucrose metabolizing enzymes, metabolic control analysis, cellular localization of gene expressions, and reverse genetic experiments have revealed that sucrose metabolism is crucial in the diazotrophic growth of heterocystic strains, and besides, that it can be connected to glycogen synthesis. This article briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge of sucrose physiological functions in modern cyanobacteria and how they might have evolved taking into account the phylogenetic analyses of sucrose enzymes.

No MeSH data available.