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Lead excretion in spanish children with autism spectrum disorder.

Fuentes-Albero M, Puig-Alcaraz C, Cauli O - Brain Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The study was performed in a group of children with ASD (n = 35, average age 7.4 ± 0.5 years) and TD (n = 34, average age 7.7 ± 0.9 years).Measurement of lead in urine was performed by atomic absorption spectrometry; symptoms of ASD were analyzed by diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DMS-IV) using the questionnary ADI-R.Careful clinical evaluation was also undertaken and statistical analysis was done taking into account any possible confounding factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Mental Health Centre, Hospital Arnau de Villanova, 46015 Valencia, Spain. milafuentesalbero@yahoo.es.

ABSTRACT
Among epigenetic factors leading to increased prevalence of juvenile neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, exposure to metals, such as lead (Pb) have led to conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of Pb in the urine of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with typically developing children (TD) age- and sex-matched, and to analyze any association between core symptoms of ASD, special diets, supplements intake or prescription drugs and the concentration of Pb. The study was performed in a group of children with ASD (n = 35, average age 7.4 ± 0.5 years) and TD (n = 34, average age 7.7 ± 0.9 years). Measurement of lead in urine was performed by atomic absorption spectrometry; symptoms of ASD were analyzed by diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DMS-IV) using the questionnary ADI-R. Careful clinical evaluation was also undertaken and statistical analysis was done taking into account any possible confounding factor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Urinary concentration of lead (Pb) in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing children (TD).
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brainsci-05-00058-f001: Urinary concentration of lead (Pb) in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing children (TD).

Mentions: No statistically difference was observed between urinary concentration of Pb in children with ASD compared to TD children (0.60 ± 0.19 versus 1.32 ± 0.44 ppb/mg·dL−1, respectively p = 0.09; Figure 1). In the ASD group there was a children with 5.59 ppb/mg·dL−1 and in the TD group two children with 12.76 ppb/mg·dL−1 and 6.41 ppb/mg·dL−1 (Figure 1). Even analyzing data without with these high values the comparison between the two groups is still no significant (p = 0.08) with a tendency to higher urine Pb level in TD group. By normalizing urinary Pb concentration to urinary specific gravity or to urine creatinine concentration we obtained similar results (no significant change in urinary Pb concentration in ASD compared to TD children) (data not shown). Sex-specific analyses for the three urinary parameters showed no significant differences suggesting that the results are not due to spurious sex-specific differences. None of the children had pica behavior or ferropenic anemia that could have caused an increase in Pb exposure or absorption, respectively.


Lead excretion in spanish children with autism spectrum disorder.

Fuentes-Albero M, Puig-Alcaraz C, Cauli O - Brain Sci (2015)

Urinary concentration of lead (Pb) in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing children (TD).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390791&req=5

brainsci-05-00058-f001: Urinary concentration of lead (Pb) in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing children (TD).
Mentions: No statistically difference was observed between urinary concentration of Pb in children with ASD compared to TD children (0.60 ± 0.19 versus 1.32 ± 0.44 ppb/mg·dL−1, respectively p = 0.09; Figure 1). In the ASD group there was a children with 5.59 ppb/mg·dL−1 and in the TD group two children with 12.76 ppb/mg·dL−1 and 6.41 ppb/mg·dL−1 (Figure 1). Even analyzing data without with these high values the comparison between the two groups is still no significant (p = 0.08) with a tendency to higher urine Pb level in TD group. By normalizing urinary Pb concentration to urinary specific gravity or to urine creatinine concentration we obtained similar results (no significant change in urinary Pb concentration in ASD compared to TD children) (data not shown). Sex-specific analyses for the three urinary parameters showed no significant differences suggesting that the results are not due to spurious sex-specific differences. None of the children had pica behavior or ferropenic anemia that could have caused an increase in Pb exposure or absorption, respectively.

Bottom Line: The study was performed in a group of children with ASD (n = 35, average age 7.4 ± 0.5 years) and TD (n = 34, average age 7.7 ± 0.9 years).Measurement of lead in urine was performed by atomic absorption spectrometry; symptoms of ASD were analyzed by diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DMS-IV) using the questionnary ADI-R.Careful clinical evaluation was also undertaken and statistical analysis was done taking into account any possible confounding factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Mental Health Centre, Hospital Arnau de Villanova, 46015 Valencia, Spain. milafuentesalbero@yahoo.es.

ABSTRACT
Among epigenetic factors leading to increased prevalence of juvenile neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, exposure to metals, such as lead (Pb) have led to conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of Pb in the urine of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with typically developing children (TD) age- and sex-matched, and to analyze any association between core symptoms of ASD, special diets, supplements intake or prescription drugs and the concentration of Pb. The study was performed in a group of children with ASD (n = 35, average age 7.4 ± 0.5 years) and TD (n = 34, average age 7.7 ± 0.9 years). Measurement of lead in urine was performed by atomic absorption spectrometry; symptoms of ASD were analyzed by diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DMS-IV) using the questionnary ADI-R. Careful clinical evaluation was also undertaken and statistical analysis was done taking into account any possible confounding factor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus