Limits...
Clinical Significance of B-type Natriuretic Peptide in Heart Failure.

Yoo BS - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Biochemical tests to detect B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-brain BNP (NT-proBNP) are useful diagnostic methods for patients with possible HF.These tests are valuable prognostic predictors for the entire spectrum of HF disease severity.The following review briefly summarizes the available information regarding the clinical significance of BNP and NT-proBNP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Biochemical tests to detect B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-brain BNP (NT-proBNP) are useful diagnostic methods for patients with possible HF. These tests are valuable prognostic predictors for the entire spectrum of HF disease severity. Therefore, the measurements of BNP or NT-proBNP taken along with conventional clinical assessments may assist clinicians in deciding treatment. The following review briefly summarizes the available information regarding the clinical significance of BNP and NT-proBNP.

No MeSH data available.


The release of BNP or NT-proBNP from the ventricular myocardium [16].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390764&req=5

f1-jlm-04-34: The release of BNP or NT-proBNP from the ventricular myocardium [16].

Mentions: BNP was first discovered in the porcine brain and hence, it was named brain natriuretic peptide. Later, it was found to be secreted from the left ventricular myocardium in response to hemodynamic stimuli such as ventricular volume expansion and pressure overload [7]. The released proBNP enters the circulatory system after it is cleaved into the biologically active C-terminal of BNP and the biologically inactive, NT-proBNP (Fig. 1). proBNP is primarily synthesized and released in the ventricle in response to ventricular hemodynamic changes; therefore, it can reflect ventricular dysfunction better than other natriuretic peptides (NPs) [8]. Moreover, it is also known to cause strong vascular relaxation and to stimulate natriuresis. Unlike atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), BNP does not usually cause immediate changes in normal hearts because its synthesis and secretion increases in response to hemodynamic stimuli over a considerable length of time [9]. The neurohormonal theory explains the major mechanism of heart failure; according to this theory, the level of BNP in the blood increases through activation of the natriuretic peptide system, which acts as a counter-regulatory system, to counteract the impaired neurohormonal balance in response to activation of the systems that induce vascular spasms (renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic nervous system, endothelin system). Therefore, BNP is primarily synthesized and released from the ventricle in response to ventricular hemodynamic changes and stress, and has been reported to indicate ventricular dysfunctions more efficiently than other NPs [10].


Clinical Significance of B-type Natriuretic Peptide in Heart Failure.

Yoo BS - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

The release of BNP or NT-proBNP from the ventricular myocardium [16].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390764&req=5

f1-jlm-04-34: The release of BNP or NT-proBNP from the ventricular myocardium [16].
Mentions: BNP was first discovered in the porcine brain and hence, it was named brain natriuretic peptide. Later, it was found to be secreted from the left ventricular myocardium in response to hemodynamic stimuli such as ventricular volume expansion and pressure overload [7]. The released proBNP enters the circulatory system after it is cleaved into the biologically active C-terminal of BNP and the biologically inactive, NT-proBNP (Fig. 1). proBNP is primarily synthesized and released in the ventricle in response to ventricular hemodynamic changes; therefore, it can reflect ventricular dysfunction better than other natriuretic peptides (NPs) [8]. Moreover, it is also known to cause strong vascular relaxation and to stimulate natriuresis. Unlike atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), BNP does not usually cause immediate changes in normal hearts because its synthesis and secretion increases in response to hemodynamic stimuli over a considerable length of time [9]. The neurohormonal theory explains the major mechanism of heart failure; according to this theory, the level of BNP in the blood increases through activation of the natriuretic peptide system, which acts as a counter-regulatory system, to counteract the impaired neurohormonal balance in response to activation of the systems that induce vascular spasms (renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic nervous system, endothelin system). Therefore, BNP is primarily synthesized and released from the ventricle in response to ventricular hemodynamic changes and stress, and has been reported to indicate ventricular dysfunctions more efficiently than other NPs [10].

Bottom Line: Biochemical tests to detect B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-brain BNP (NT-proBNP) are useful diagnostic methods for patients with possible HF.These tests are valuable prognostic predictors for the entire spectrum of HF disease severity.The following review briefly summarizes the available information regarding the clinical significance of BNP and NT-proBNP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Biochemical tests to detect B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-brain BNP (NT-proBNP) are useful diagnostic methods for patients with possible HF. These tests are valuable prognostic predictors for the entire spectrum of HF disease severity. Therefore, the measurements of BNP or NT-proBNP taken along with conventional clinical assessments may assist clinicians in deciding treatment. The following review briefly summarizes the available information regarding the clinical significance of BNP and NT-proBNP.

No MeSH data available.