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The Role of Functional Foods in Cutaneous Anti-aging.

Cho S - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis.Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids.This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Boramae Hospital ; Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital ; Institute of Human-Environment Interface Biology, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Oral supplementation of micronutrients, or functional foods, to prevent aging has gained much attention and popularity as society ages and becomes more affluent, and as science reveals the pathological mechanisms of aging. Aging of the skin combines biologic aging and extrinsic aging caused predominantly by sunlight and other environmental toxins. Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis. Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Collagen peptides and proteoglycans are claimed to provide building blocks of the dermal matrix. This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ginseng mixture treatment increases type I procollagen immunostaining in human facial skin. Immunohistochemistry for SP1.D8 was performed from punch-biopsied skin samples, and the degree of staining was visually graded by five dermatologists. Data are mean ± SE values (n = 6, treatment group; n = 7, placebo group). *p < 05 by Wilcoxon signed rank test, compared with baseline (from ref. 35).
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f3-jlm-04-08: Ginseng mixture treatment increases type I procollagen immunostaining in human facial skin. Immunohistochemistry for SP1.D8 was performed from punch-biopsied skin samples, and the degree of staining was visually graded by five dermatologists. Data are mean ± SE values (n = 6, treatment group; n = 7, placebo group). *p < 05 by Wilcoxon signed rank test, compared with baseline (from ref. 35).

Mentions: The roots of Panax ginseng have been used as a general tonic in Oriental medicine for several thousand years. Red ginseng is prepared by steaming and air-drying P. ginseng, and reportedly has more bioactivity than white ginseng, which is the peeled and air-dried form [34]. Red ginseng contains various ginsenosides that have antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and anti-aging activity. Our group performed the first controlled human study on 82 female volunteers to assess red ginseng’s effects on photoaged skin. Compared to placebo, the group that took 3 g/d of a red ginseng extract-containing herbal mixture for 24 weeks had decreased facial wrinkles with concomitant increases in type I procollagen synthesis (Fig. 3) and fibrillin-1 fiber length (Fig. 4). Therefore, objective evidence of a reduction in facial wrinkles by long-term ingestion of red ginseng was provided for the first time; the clinical improvement was substantiated by biochemical and histological evidence of increased collagen and elastic fiber synthesis in the dermis [35]. The clinical improvement may be due to the activation of COL1A2 promoter and Smad signaling [36], through ginseng’s estrogen-like activity [37], and/or additionally through increased hyaluronan levels by a metabolite of ginsenosides [38].


The Role of Functional Foods in Cutaneous Anti-aging.

Cho S - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Ginseng mixture treatment increases type I procollagen immunostaining in human facial skin. Immunohistochemistry for SP1.D8 was performed from punch-biopsied skin samples, and the degree of staining was visually graded by five dermatologists. Data are mean ± SE values (n = 6, treatment group; n = 7, placebo group). *p < 05 by Wilcoxon signed rank test, compared with baseline (from ref. 35).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390761&req=5

f3-jlm-04-08: Ginseng mixture treatment increases type I procollagen immunostaining in human facial skin. Immunohistochemistry for SP1.D8 was performed from punch-biopsied skin samples, and the degree of staining was visually graded by five dermatologists. Data are mean ± SE values (n = 6, treatment group; n = 7, placebo group). *p < 05 by Wilcoxon signed rank test, compared with baseline (from ref. 35).
Mentions: The roots of Panax ginseng have been used as a general tonic in Oriental medicine for several thousand years. Red ginseng is prepared by steaming and air-drying P. ginseng, and reportedly has more bioactivity than white ginseng, which is the peeled and air-dried form [34]. Red ginseng contains various ginsenosides that have antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and anti-aging activity. Our group performed the first controlled human study on 82 female volunteers to assess red ginseng’s effects on photoaged skin. Compared to placebo, the group that took 3 g/d of a red ginseng extract-containing herbal mixture for 24 weeks had decreased facial wrinkles with concomitant increases in type I procollagen synthesis (Fig. 3) and fibrillin-1 fiber length (Fig. 4). Therefore, objective evidence of a reduction in facial wrinkles by long-term ingestion of red ginseng was provided for the first time; the clinical improvement was substantiated by biochemical and histological evidence of increased collagen and elastic fiber synthesis in the dermis [35]. The clinical improvement may be due to the activation of COL1A2 promoter and Smad signaling [36], through ginseng’s estrogen-like activity [37], and/or additionally through increased hyaluronan levels by a metabolite of ginsenosides [38].

Bottom Line: Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis.Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids.This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Boramae Hospital ; Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital ; Institute of Human-Environment Interface Biology, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Oral supplementation of micronutrients, or functional foods, to prevent aging has gained much attention and popularity as society ages and becomes more affluent, and as science reveals the pathological mechanisms of aging. Aging of the skin combines biologic aging and extrinsic aging caused predominantly by sunlight and other environmental toxins. Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis. Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Collagen peptides and proteoglycans are claimed to provide building blocks of the dermal matrix. This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus