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The Role of Functional Foods in Cutaneous Anti-aging.

Cho S - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis.Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids.This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Boramae Hospital ; Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital ; Institute of Human-Environment Interface Biology, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Oral supplementation of micronutrients, or functional foods, to prevent aging has gained much attention and popularity as society ages and becomes more affluent, and as science reveals the pathological mechanisms of aging. Aging of the skin combines biologic aging and extrinsic aging caused predominantly by sunlight and other environmental toxins. Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis. Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Collagen peptides and proteoglycans are claimed to provide building blocks of the dermal matrix. This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Type I procollagen immunostaining in the buttock skin before and after aloe vera intake (original magnification ×200). The results are representative of 6 biopsied subjects in each group (from ref. 23).
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f2-jlm-04-08: Type I procollagen immunostaining in the buttock skin before and after aloe vera intake (original magnification ×200). The results are representative of 6 biopsied subjects in each group (from ref. 23).

Mentions: Aloe vera gel is obtained from the pulp of a tropical cactus that belongs to the lily family with purported anti-inflammatory, healing, moisturizing, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. Dietary aloe vera gel supplementation (low dose, 1,200 mg/d; high dose, 3,600 mg/d) in 30 photoaged female volunteers for 90 days resulted in improvements in facial wrinkles and elasticity, an increase in type I procollagen mRNA levels, and a reduction in MMP-1 mRNA levels at both doses. Compared to baseline, type I procollagen immunostaining increases throughout the dermis in both groups (Fig. 2) [23]. No dose-response relationship has been found in the tested doses. The known therapeutic effect of aloe vera is due to its immunostimulatory properties attributed to the presence of polysaccharides; the polysaccharides have no significant anti-oxidant activity [24]. An acetylated glucomannan, acemannan, is the biologically active, dominant polysaccharide that has been shown to increase collagen biosynthesis, probably through macrophage immunostimulation [25].


The Role of Functional Foods in Cutaneous Anti-aging.

Cho S - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Type I procollagen immunostaining in the buttock skin before and after aloe vera intake (original magnification ×200). The results are representative of 6 biopsied subjects in each group (from ref. 23).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390761&req=5

f2-jlm-04-08: Type I procollagen immunostaining in the buttock skin before and after aloe vera intake (original magnification ×200). The results are representative of 6 biopsied subjects in each group (from ref. 23).
Mentions: Aloe vera gel is obtained from the pulp of a tropical cactus that belongs to the lily family with purported anti-inflammatory, healing, moisturizing, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties. Dietary aloe vera gel supplementation (low dose, 1,200 mg/d; high dose, 3,600 mg/d) in 30 photoaged female volunteers for 90 days resulted in improvements in facial wrinkles and elasticity, an increase in type I procollagen mRNA levels, and a reduction in MMP-1 mRNA levels at both doses. Compared to baseline, type I procollagen immunostaining increases throughout the dermis in both groups (Fig. 2) [23]. No dose-response relationship has been found in the tested doses. The known therapeutic effect of aloe vera is due to its immunostimulatory properties attributed to the presence of polysaccharides; the polysaccharides have no significant anti-oxidant activity [24]. An acetylated glucomannan, acemannan, is the biologically active, dominant polysaccharide that has been shown to increase collagen biosynthesis, probably through macrophage immunostimulation [25].

Bottom Line: Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis.Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids.This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Boramae Hospital ; Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital ; Institute of Human-Environment Interface Biology, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Oral supplementation of micronutrients, or functional foods, to prevent aging has gained much attention and popularity as society ages and becomes more affluent, and as science reveals the pathological mechanisms of aging. Aging of the skin combines biologic aging and extrinsic aging caused predominantly by sunlight and other environmental toxins. Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis. Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Collagen peptides and proteoglycans are claimed to provide building blocks of the dermal matrix. This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus