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The Role of Functional Foods in Cutaneous Anti-aging.

Cho S - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis.Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids.This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Boramae Hospital ; Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital ; Institute of Human-Environment Interface Biology, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Oral supplementation of micronutrients, or functional foods, to prevent aging has gained much attention and popularity as society ages and becomes more affluent, and as science reveals the pathological mechanisms of aging. Aging of the skin combines biologic aging and extrinsic aging caused predominantly by sunlight and other environmental toxins. Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis. Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Collagen peptides and proteoglycans are claimed to provide building blocks of the dermal matrix. This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Thymine dimer immunostaining demonstrating nuclear staining of thymine dimer in UV-irradiated buttock skin 24 hrs after 2 MED of UV irradiation, before and after β-carotene in-take. The figures are representative of data from 6 subjects (original magnification ×400) (from ref. 7).
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f1-jlm-04-08: Thymine dimer immunostaining demonstrating nuclear staining of thymine dimer in UV-irradiated buttock skin 24 hrs after 2 MED of UV irradiation, before and after β-carotene in-take. The figures are representative of data from 6 subjects (original magnification ×400) (from ref. 7).

Mentions: Beta-carotene is a very lipophilic, plant-derived carotenoid that has provitamin A (retinol) ROS-quenching activity [5] and therefore has been used for the treatment of erythropoietic protoporphyria and to increase sunburn threshold. The maximum dosage recommended by the Food and Drug Administration is 300 mg/d [6]. In 30 photoaged female subjects, 90 days of 30 mg/d β-carotene supplementation improved facial wrinkles and elasticity, increased type I procollagen mRNA levels, decreased UV-induced thymine dimer staining, and reduced 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine staining, hence demonstrating its anti-photo-aging effects; however, 90 mg/d β-carotene decreased minimal erythema dose (MED) and tended to increase thymine dimer-staining cells after supplementation (Fig. 1) [7]. Since MED is a measure of cutaneous reactivity to UV irradiation, 90 mg/d of β-carotene seems to render the skin more susceptible to UV-induced erythema. In addition, UV-induced direct cutaneous DNA damage, as measured by thymine dimer staining, tended to increase, albeit non-significantly, in the high-dose group. Oxidative DNA damage, as measured by 8-OHdG stain, was not significantly affected by high-dose β-carotene. Taken together, the dosage of β-carotene matters: 30 mg/d has beneficial effects on cutaneous photoaging, but single 90 mg/d supplementation is not recommended.


The Role of Functional Foods in Cutaneous Anti-aging.

Cho S - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Thymine dimer immunostaining demonstrating nuclear staining of thymine dimer in UV-irradiated buttock skin 24 hrs after 2 MED of UV irradiation, before and after β-carotene in-take. The figures are representative of data from 6 subjects (original magnification ×400) (from ref. 7).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390761&req=5

f1-jlm-04-08: Thymine dimer immunostaining demonstrating nuclear staining of thymine dimer in UV-irradiated buttock skin 24 hrs after 2 MED of UV irradiation, before and after β-carotene in-take. The figures are representative of data from 6 subjects (original magnification ×400) (from ref. 7).
Mentions: Beta-carotene is a very lipophilic, plant-derived carotenoid that has provitamin A (retinol) ROS-quenching activity [5] and therefore has been used for the treatment of erythropoietic protoporphyria and to increase sunburn threshold. The maximum dosage recommended by the Food and Drug Administration is 300 mg/d [6]. In 30 photoaged female subjects, 90 days of 30 mg/d β-carotene supplementation improved facial wrinkles and elasticity, increased type I procollagen mRNA levels, decreased UV-induced thymine dimer staining, and reduced 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine staining, hence demonstrating its anti-photo-aging effects; however, 90 mg/d β-carotene decreased minimal erythema dose (MED) and tended to increase thymine dimer-staining cells after supplementation (Fig. 1) [7]. Since MED is a measure of cutaneous reactivity to UV irradiation, 90 mg/d of β-carotene seems to render the skin more susceptible to UV-induced erythema. In addition, UV-induced direct cutaneous DNA damage, as measured by thymine dimer staining, tended to increase, albeit non-significantly, in the high-dose group. Oxidative DNA damage, as measured by 8-OHdG stain, was not significantly affected by high-dose β-carotene. Taken together, the dosage of β-carotene matters: 30 mg/d has beneficial effects on cutaneous photoaging, but single 90 mg/d supplementation is not recommended.

Bottom Line: Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis.Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids.This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Boramae Hospital ; Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital ; Institute of Human-Environment Interface Biology, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Oral supplementation of micronutrients, or functional foods, to prevent aging has gained much attention and popularity as society ages and becomes more affluent, and as science reveals the pathological mechanisms of aging. Aging of the skin combines biologic aging and extrinsic aging caused predominantly by sunlight and other environmental toxins. Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis. Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Collagen peptides and proteoglycans are claimed to provide building blocks of the dermal matrix. This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus