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Health Behaviors, Disparities and Deterring Factors for Breast Cancer Screening of Immigrant Women - A Challenge to Health Care Professionals.

Alcazar-Bejerano IL - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Articles included were quantitative and qualitative, written in English for publication, and subjects were middle-aged, married immigrant women.Socioeconomic status, education level and knowledge, availability of health insurance and acculturation were among the individual factors.Joint effort of individuals, community, health care professionals and government institutions are recommended to further address the continuous rise of breast cancer mortality worldwide.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nursing, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: This literature review was made to provide comprehensive to provide comprehensive understanding of health disparities as well as factors and barriers to cancer screening of immigrant women in multicultural societies.

Methods: Published articles from 1990-2013 were searched using databases such as CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and Science Direct showing evidence of contributing factors and barriers to breast cancer screening practices of immigrant women in developed and developing countries. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 45 qualified articles were included in the review process.

Results: Articles included were quantitative and qualitative, written in English for publication, and subjects were middle-aged, married immigrant women. The identified influential factors and barriers that prevent immigrant women from cancer screening were categorized as individual, socio-cultural and behavioral factors. Socioeconomic status, education level and knowledge, availability of health insurance and acculturation were among the individual factors. Presence of social support and recommendation from health care professionals were strongly associated with compliance with cancer screening. Cultural beliefs and practices as well as behavioral factors were among the barriers that deter women from participating in cancer screening.

Conclusion: To alleviate the negative factors and barriers that affect the participation of high-risk immigrant women, a client-centered assessment and intervention approach with specific regard to cultural beliefs and practices should be considered by health care professionals. Joint effort of individuals, community, health care professionals and government institutions are recommended to further address the continuous rise of breast cancer mortality worldwide.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram for study selection.
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f1-jlm-04-55: Flow diagram for study selection.

Mentions: In this review article we used the following inclusion criteria: immigrant women living for more than 5 years in a foreign country, reproductive age, breast cancer screening practices such as BSE, CBE or mammography and published articles in English. Out of 250 articles, a total of 45 studies were selected as relevant for the review process. Fig. 1 shows the search and selection process for the relevant studies.


Health Behaviors, Disparities and Deterring Factors for Breast Cancer Screening of Immigrant Women - A Challenge to Health Care Professionals.

Alcazar-Bejerano IL - J Lifestyle Med (2014)

Flow diagram for study selection.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390760&req=5

f1-jlm-04-55: Flow diagram for study selection.
Mentions: In this review article we used the following inclusion criteria: immigrant women living for more than 5 years in a foreign country, reproductive age, breast cancer screening practices such as BSE, CBE or mammography and published articles in English. Out of 250 articles, a total of 45 studies were selected as relevant for the review process. Fig. 1 shows the search and selection process for the relevant studies.

Bottom Line: Articles included were quantitative and qualitative, written in English for publication, and subjects were middle-aged, married immigrant women.Socioeconomic status, education level and knowledge, availability of health insurance and acculturation were among the individual factors.Joint effort of individuals, community, health care professionals and government institutions are recommended to further address the continuous rise of breast cancer mortality worldwide.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nursing, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: This literature review was made to provide comprehensive to provide comprehensive understanding of health disparities as well as factors and barriers to cancer screening of immigrant women in multicultural societies.

Methods: Published articles from 1990-2013 were searched using databases such as CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and Science Direct showing evidence of contributing factors and barriers to breast cancer screening practices of immigrant women in developed and developing countries. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 45 qualified articles were included in the review process.

Results: Articles included were quantitative and qualitative, written in English for publication, and subjects were middle-aged, married immigrant women. The identified influential factors and barriers that prevent immigrant women from cancer screening were categorized as individual, socio-cultural and behavioral factors. Socioeconomic status, education level and knowledge, availability of health insurance and acculturation were among the individual factors. Presence of social support and recommendation from health care professionals were strongly associated with compliance with cancer screening. Cultural beliefs and practices as well as behavioral factors were among the barriers that deter women from participating in cancer screening.

Conclusion: To alleviate the negative factors and barriers that affect the participation of high-risk immigrant women, a client-centered assessment and intervention approach with specific regard to cultural beliefs and practices should be considered by health care professionals. Joint effort of individuals, community, health care professionals and government institutions are recommended to further address the continuous rise of breast cancer mortality worldwide.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus