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Cooling the Skin: Understanding a Specific Cutaneous Thermosensation.

Park B, Kim SJ - J Lifestyle Med (2013)

Bottom Line: We successively treated her using a topical formulation of TRPM8 agonist which produces a cooling sensation.Among them, the function of transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors is very unique because they transfer the signal not only in the neuronal perception pathway but also in the cellular signal pathway where it appears as an ion channel.This review explains the cooling sensation of skin which has not been evaluated thoroughly, and provides insights for further clinical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
A patient recently presented with long-standing severe itching originating from lichen sclerosus et atrophicus at the vulva area. We successively treated her using a topical formulation of TRPM8 agonist which produces a cooling sensation. The cooling sensation, an afferent sensory perception in various skin neuronal pathways, could be a useful mechanism to relieve an itchy sensation in various skin disorders. Mechanoreceptors are related to touch vibration and pressure sensations and have a special morphology where the nerve endings are optimized to receive sensory inputs. However, unmyelinated nerve fibers are believed to transfer nociception such as pain, itching, stinging and burning derived from chemical or thermal stimuli. Among them, the function of transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors is very unique because they transfer the signal not only in the neuronal perception pathway but also in the cellular signal pathway where it appears as an ion channel. This review explains the cooling sensation of skin which has not been evaluated thoroughly, and provides insights for further clinical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic image of the six transmembrane spans (TM 1-6) of a transient receptor potential (TRP) protein. The pore loop (P) is located between TM5 and 6, and the intracellular amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini are also seen.
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f1-jlm-03-91: Schematic image of the six transmembrane spans (TM 1-6) of a transient receptor potential (TRP) protein. The pore loop (P) is located between TM5 and 6, and the intracellular amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini are also seen.

Mentions: TRP cation channels are unique cellular sensors characterized by a promiscuous activation mechanism. TRPs are classified according to their primary amino acid sequence rather than selectivity or ligand affinity, because their properties are heterogenous and their regulation is complex. TRP channels are membrane proteins with 6 putative trans-membrane (TM) spans and a cation-permeable pore region formed by a short hydrophobic stretch between TM5 and TM6 (Fig. 1). TRP proteins are essentially cation-permeable ion channels sensitive to a remarkable range of stimuli [15].


Cooling the Skin: Understanding a Specific Cutaneous Thermosensation.

Park B, Kim SJ - J Lifestyle Med (2013)

Schematic image of the six transmembrane spans (TM 1-6) of a transient receptor potential (TRP) protein. The pore loop (P) is located between TM5 and 6, and the intracellular amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini are also seen.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390739&req=5

f1-jlm-03-91: Schematic image of the six transmembrane spans (TM 1-6) of a transient receptor potential (TRP) protein. The pore loop (P) is located between TM5 and 6, and the intracellular amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini are also seen.
Mentions: TRP cation channels are unique cellular sensors characterized by a promiscuous activation mechanism. TRPs are classified according to their primary amino acid sequence rather than selectivity or ligand affinity, because their properties are heterogenous and their regulation is complex. TRP channels are membrane proteins with 6 putative trans-membrane (TM) spans and a cation-permeable pore region formed by a short hydrophobic stretch between TM5 and TM6 (Fig. 1). TRP proteins are essentially cation-permeable ion channels sensitive to a remarkable range of stimuli [15].

Bottom Line: We successively treated her using a topical formulation of TRPM8 agonist which produces a cooling sensation.Among them, the function of transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors is very unique because they transfer the signal not only in the neuronal perception pathway but also in the cellular signal pathway where it appears as an ion channel.This review explains the cooling sensation of skin which has not been evaluated thoroughly, and provides insights for further clinical applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
A patient recently presented with long-standing severe itching originating from lichen sclerosus et atrophicus at the vulva area. We successively treated her using a topical formulation of TRPM8 agonist which produces a cooling sensation. The cooling sensation, an afferent sensory perception in various skin neuronal pathways, could be a useful mechanism to relieve an itchy sensation in various skin disorders. Mechanoreceptors are related to touch vibration and pressure sensations and have a special morphology where the nerve endings are optimized to receive sensory inputs. However, unmyelinated nerve fibers are believed to transfer nociception such as pain, itching, stinging and burning derived from chemical or thermal stimuli. Among them, the function of transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors is very unique because they transfer the signal not only in the neuronal perception pathway but also in the cellular signal pathway where it appears as an ion channel. This review explains the cooling sensation of skin which has not been evaluated thoroughly, and provides insights for further clinical applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus