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Psychotropic drug use in adolescents born with an orofacial cleft: a population-based study.

Nilsson S, Merlo J, Lyberg-Åhlander V, Psouni E - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: When adjusted for potential confounders, having a CL (OR=1.63, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.46) or a CPO (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.01) increased the risk of psychotropic drug use.Results were not significant regarding adolescents who had a CLP (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.80).Our findings suggest that, since the three OFC types are associated with different long-term risks of poor psychological health, the three groups should be studied separately concerning long-term psychosocial consequences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

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Study population.
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BMJOPEN2014005306F1: Study population.

Mentions: We obtained a database derived from the Swedish Medical Birth Register linked to other national databases such as the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, the National Mortality Register, the Emigration Register and the National Inpatient Register. These registers, administered by Statistics Sweden and by the National Board of Health and Welfare, are linked using personal identification numbers assigned to each person residing in Sweden. In the data we received, identification numbers were replaced with arbitrary numbers, thereby securing anonymity. We identified all children born in Sweden during the period 1987–1993 (N=811 599). As there is evidence of an underuse of psychotropic drugs in relation to the needs of adolescent descendants of migrant women,33 potentially confounding the outcomes analysis in this study, we excluded children of parents born outside Sweden. We also excluded children who were not singletons, died or emigrated from Sweden before 31 December 2008 (end of follow-up period). The final cohort consisted of 626 109 adolescents (figure 1).


Psychotropic drug use in adolescents born with an orofacial cleft: a population-based study.

Nilsson S, Merlo J, Lyberg-Åhlander V, Psouni E - BMJ Open (2015)

Study population.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390737&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005306F1: Study population.
Mentions: We obtained a database derived from the Swedish Medical Birth Register linked to other national databases such as the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, the National Mortality Register, the Emigration Register and the National Inpatient Register. These registers, administered by Statistics Sweden and by the National Board of Health and Welfare, are linked using personal identification numbers assigned to each person residing in Sweden. In the data we received, identification numbers were replaced with arbitrary numbers, thereby securing anonymity. We identified all children born in Sweden during the period 1987–1993 (N=811 599). As there is evidence of an underuse of psychotropic drugs in relation to the needs of adolescent descendants of migrant women,33 potentially confounding the outcomes analysis in this study, we excluded children of parents born outside Sweden. We also excluded children who were not singletons, died or emigrated from Sweden before 31 December 2008 (end of follow-up period). The final cohort consisted of 626 109 adolescents (figure 1).

Bottom Line: When adjusted for potential confounders, having a CL (OR=1.63, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.46) or a CPO (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.01) increased the risk of psychotropic drug use.Results were not significant regarding adolescents who had a CLP (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.80).Our findings suggest that, since the three OFC types are associated with different long-term risks of poor psychological health, the three groups should be studied separately concerning long-term psychosocial consequences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus