Limits...
The association between obesity and severe disability among adults aged 50 or over in nine high-income, middle-income and low-income countries: a cross-sectional study.

Koyanagi A, Moneta MV, Garin N, Olaya B, Ayuso-Mateos JL, Chatterji S, Leonardi M, Sainio P, Galas A, Haro JM - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Disability was defined as severe or extreme difficulty in conducting at least one of six types of basic activities of daily living (ADL).Interaction analysis showed that obese individuals in high-income countries were more likely to have ADL limitations than those in low-income or middle-income countries.The higher odds for disability among obese individuals in high-income countries may imply longer life lived with disability due to factors such as the decline in cardiovascular disease mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development Unit, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.

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Prevalence of limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) by BMI category and country. S Africa South Africa; BMI, body mass index; COURAGE, Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe; SAGE, WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health. ADL disability was assessed by six standard basic ADL questions on difficulties in the past 30 days with washing whole body, getting dressed, moving inside home, eating (including cutting food), getting up from lying down, and getting to and using the toilet. The answer options to these six questions were none, mild, moderate, severe and extreme/cannot do. ADL disability was a dichotomous variable where those who answered severe or extreme/cannot do to any of the six questions were considered to have limitations in ADL. Data presented in figure are per cent. Sampling weights were used to calculate the prevalence. Bar denotes upper end of 95% CI.
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BMJOPEN2014007313F1: Prevalence of limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) by BMI category and country. S Africa South Africa; BMI, body mass index; COURAGE, Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe; SAGE, WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health. ADL disability was assessed by six standard basic ADL questions on difficulties in the past 30 days with washing whole body, getting dressed, moving inside home, eating (including cutting food), getting up from lying down, and getting to and using the toilet. The answer options to these six questions were none, mild, moderate, severe and extreme/cannot do. ADL disability was a dichotomous variable where those who answered severe or extreme/cannot do to any of the six questions were considered to have limitations in ADL. Data presented in figure are per cent. Sampling weights were used to calculate the prevalence. Bar denotes upper end of 95% CI.

Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the prevalence of ADL limitations by BMI category. A clear dose-dependent relationship between BMI and ADL limitations was observed in Finland, Poland and Spain. The prevalence (95% CI) of limitations in ADL when using lower cut-offs for Asia were 1.6% (1.2% to 2.2%), 1.4% (1% to 1.9%) and 1.4% (0.8% to 2.2%) for BMI 18.5–22.9 kg/m2, 23.0–27.4 kg/m2, and ≥27.5 kg/m2, respectively in China. The corresponding figures for India were 10.7% (8.7% to 13%), 11.8% (9% to 15.3%) and 10.1% (6.7% to 15%). The association between BMI and ADL limitations estimated by multivariable logistic regression is shown in table 2. With the exception of China, a trend for higher BMI to have stronger associations with ADL limitations compared to normal weight was observed in most countries although this association was not significant in some. In China, a non-significant trend for a decrease in the odds for ADL disability with higher BMI was observed.


The association between obesity and severe disability among adults aged 50 or over in nine high-income, middle-income and low-income countries: a cross-sectional study.

Koyanagi A, Moneta MV, Garin N, Olaya B, Ayuso-Mateos JL, Chatterji S, Leonardi M, Sainio P, Galas A, Haro JM - BMJ Open (2015)

Prevalence of limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) by BMI category and country. S Africa South Africa; BMI, body mass index; COURAGE, Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe; SAGE, WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health. ADL disability was assessed by six standard basic ADL questions on difficulties in the past 30 days with washing whole body, getting dressed, moving inside home, eating (including cutting food), getting up from lying down, and getting to and using the toilet. The answer options to these six questions were none, mild, moderate, severe and extreme/cannot do. ADL disability was a dichotomous variable where those who answered severe or extreme/cannot do to any of the six questions were considered to have limitations in ADL. Data presented in figure are per cent. Sampling weights were used to calculate the prevalence. Bar denotes upper end of 95% CI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390733&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007313F1: Prevalence of limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) by BMI category and country. S Africa South Africa; BMI, body mass index; COURAGE, Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe; SAGE, WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health. ADL disability was assessed by six standard basic ADL questions on difficulties in the past 30 days with washing whole body, getting dressed, moving inside home, eating (including cutting food), getting up from lying down, and getting to and using the toilet. The answer options to these six questions were none, mild, moderate, severe and extreme/cannot do. ADL disability was a dichotomous variable where those who answered severe or extreme/cannot do to any of the six questions were considered to have limitations in ADL. Data presented in figure are per cent. Sampling weights were used to calculate the prevalence. Bar denotes upper end of 95% CI.
Mentions: Figure 1 illustrates the prevalence of ADL limitations by BMI category. A clear dose-dependent relationship between BMI and ADL limitations was observed in Finland, Poland and Spain. The prevalence (95% CI) of limitations in ADL when using lower cut-offs for Asia were 1.6% (1.2% to 2.2%), 1.4% (1% to 1.9%) and 1.4% (0.8% to 2.2%) for BMI 18.5–22.9 kg/m2, 23.0–27.4 kg/m2, and ≥27.5 kg/m2, respectively in China. The corresponding figures for India were 10.7% (8.7% to 13%), 11.8% (9% to 15.3%) and 10.1% (6.7% to 15%). The association between BMI and ADL limitations estimated by multivariable logistic regression is shown in table 2. With the exception of China, a trend for higher BMI to have stronger associations with ADL limitations compared to normal weight was observed in most countries although this association was not significant in some. In China, a non-significant trend for a decrease in the odds for ADL disability with higher BMI was observed.

Bottom Line: Disability was defined as severe or extreme difficulty in conducting at least one of six types of basic activities of daily living (ADL).Interaction analysis showed that obese individuals in high-income countries were more likely to have ADL limitations than those in low-income or middle-income countries.The higher odds for disability among obese individuals in high-income countries may imply longer life lived with disability due to factors such as the decline in cardiovascular disease mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development Unit, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus