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Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system.

Petrie J, Easton S, Naik V, Lockie C, Brett SJ, Stümpfle R - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service.Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY).Cost and length of stay of CPC 1-2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3-4 patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Perioperative Medicine and Critical Care Research, London, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Graph demonstrating costs (median, 25th and 75th centiles and minimum and maximum values) both for ICU (light grey) and total (ICU and non-ICU) stay in hospital (dark grey) for different outcome groups.
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BMJOPEN2014005797F3: Graph demonstrating costs (median, 25th and 75th centiles and minimum and maximum values) both for ICU (light grey) and total (ICU and non-ICU) stay in hospital (dark grey) for different outcome groups.

Mentions: Costs and length of stay are shown stratifies by outcome in tables 6 and 7. The average (median) cost of a CPC 1–2 patient hospital (ICU+non-ICU) stay was significantly (p<0.005) lower at £29 000 than that of a CPC 3–4 patient (£53 000) as shown in figure 3. The length of stay was significantly longer in CPC 3–4 patients (p<0.005). There was also a significant correlation between length of stay and cost with much longer length of stay in ICU and hospital for the CPC 3–4 patients (0.9795 (p<0.0001) and 0.6193 (p<0.0001) respectively; see figure 4). While the average overall hospital cost per patient admitted to ICU was £20 000 (this includes non-survivors), the overall hospital cost per survivor of any CPC was £51 000 (£1 698 000/33). The total hospital cost per high-quality survivor (defined as CPC 1–2) was £65 000 (£1 698 000/26). Thus a major determinant of cost for the CPC 1–2 group was the burden of cost of the non-survivors and CPC 3–4 patient group. Taking into account the deaths of five patients in the year following hospital discharge the cost per CPC 1–2 1-year survivor was £81 000 (£1 698 000/21).


Hospital costs of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated in intensive care; a single centre evaluation using the national tariff-based system.

Petrie J, Easton S, Naik V, Lockie C, Brett SJ, Stümpfle R - BMJ Open (2015)

Graph demonstrating costs (median, 25th and 75th centiles and minimum and maximum values) both for ICU (light grey) and total (ICU and non-ICU) stay in hospital (dark grey) for different outcome groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390724&req=5

BMJOPEN2014005797F3: Graph demonstrating costs (median, 25th and 75th centiles and minimum and maximum values) both for ICU (light grey) and total (ICU and non-ICU) stay in hospital (dark grey) for different outcome groups.
Mentions: Costs and length of stay are shown stratifies by outcome in tables 6 and 7. The average (median) cost of a CPC 1–2 patient hospital (ICU+non-ICU) stay was significantly (p<0.005) lower at £29 000 than that of a CPC 3–4 patient (£53 000) as shown in figure 3. The length of stay was significantly longer in CPC 3–4 patients (p<0.005). There was also a significant correlation between length of stay and cost with much longer length of stay in ICU and hospital for the CPC 3–4 patients (0.9795 (p<0.0001) and 0.6193 (p<0.0001) respectively; see figure 4). While the average overall hospital cost per patient admitted to ICU was £20 000 (this includes non-survivors), the overall hospital cost per survivor of any CPC was £51 000 (£1 698 000/33). The total hospital cost per high-quality survivor (defined as CPC 1–2) was £65 000 (£1 698 000/26). Thus a major determinant of cost for the CPC 1–2 group was the burden of cost of the non-survivors and CPC 3–4 patient group. Taking into account the deaths of five patients in the year following hospital discharge the cost per CPC 1–2 1-year survivor was £81 000 (£1 698 000/21).

Bottom Line: This is essential for assessment of cost-effectiveness of interventions necessary to allow just allocation of resources within the National Health Service.Secondarily, we estimated cost effectiveness based on estimates of survival and utility from previous studies to calculate costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY).Cost and length of stay of CPC 1-2 patients was considerably lower than CPC 3-4 patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Perioperative Medicine and Critical Care Research, London, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus