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Hydrogen sulfide and traffic-related air pollutants in association with increased mortality: a case-crossover study in Reykjavik, Iceland.

Finnbjornsdottir RG, Oudin A, Elvarsson BT, Gislason T, Rafnsson V - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The population of the greater Reykjavik area (n=181,558) during 2003-2009.The traffic-related pollutants were generally not associated with statistical significant IR%s.The results suggest that ambient H₂S air pollution may increase mortality in Reykjavik, Iceland.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.

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Distribution of 24 h average concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in μg/m3 in Reykjavik, Iceland, over the study period of 1 January 2003–31 December 2009. H2S measurements started in February 2006. Gaps in figure are due to missing data.
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BMJOPEN2014007272F1: Distribution of 24 h average concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in μg/m3 in Reykjavik, Iceland, over the study period of 1 January 2003–31 December 2009. H2S measurements started in February 2006. Gaps in figure are due to missing data.

Mentions: The distributions of the environmental variables are presented in table 2. Pollution data completeness varied from 48.9% (H2S) to 97.5% (PM10; table 2). There was a seasonal pattern among each pollutant and meteorological variable. The mean for each pollutant was higher during the winter months of November–April than during the summer months May–October. The concentration range for PM10 was the largest, followed by NO2. Daily SO2 24 h average concentration was often low with a small range up to 11.0 µm/m3; only 5% of the 24 h values were above 5.3 µg/m3. The highest value of the IQR was for O3 and lowest for SO2. For H2S, the IQR was quite low (2.60 µg/m3) although the maximum value was around 92 µg/m3 (figure 1).


Hydrogen sulfide and traffic-related air pollutants in association with increased mortality: a case-crossover study in Reykjavik, Iceland.

Finnbjornsdottir RG, Oudin A, Elvarsson BT, Gislason T, Rafnsson V - BMJ Open (2015)

Distribution of 24 h average concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in μg/m3 in Reykjavik, Iceland, over the study period of 1 January 2003–31 December 2009. H2S measurements started in February 2006. Gaps in figure are due to missing data.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390682&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007272F1: Distribution of 24 h average concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in μg/m3 in Reykjavik, Iceland, over the study period of 1 January 2003–31 December 2009. H2S measurements started in February 2006. Gaps in figure are due to missing data.
Mentions: The distributions of the environmental variables are presented in table 2. Pollution data completeness varied from 48.9% (H2S) to 97.5% (PM10; table 2). There was a seasonal pattern among each pollutant and meteorological variable. The mean for each pollutant was higher during the winter months of November–April than during the summer months May–October. The concentration range for PM10 was the largest, followed by NO2. Daily SO2 24 h average concentration was often low with a small range up to 11.0 µm/m3; only 5% of the 24 h values were above 5.3 µg/m3. The highest value of the IQR was for O3 and lowest for SO2. For H2S, the IQR was quite low (2.60 µg/m3) although the maximum value was around 92 µg/m3 (figure 1).

Bottom Line: The population of the greater Reykjavik area (n=181,558) during 2003-2009.The traffic-related pollutants were generally not associated with statistical significant IR%s.The results suggest that ambient H₂S air pollution may increase mortality in Reykjavik, Iceland.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus