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Evaluation of a school-based program aimed at preventing depressive symptoms in adolescents.

Garmy P, Jakobsson U, Carlsson KS, Berg A, Clausson EK - J Sch Nurs (2014)

Bottom Line: The students, both females and males, rated their depressed symptoms as significantly lower after the course; and for the females, this was maintained 1-year postintervention.The implementation costs for the initial 2 years were about US$300 per student.Positive effects of a universal school-based cognitive behavioral intervention aiming at preventing depressive symptoms in adolescents were found, especially among females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden Center for Primary Health Care Research, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden pernilla.garmy@med.lu.se.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Mentions: Promoting well-being and preventing depressive symptoms in adolescence are important school health concerns. Depression in adolescence is a common health issue globally (Patel, Flisher, Hetrick, & McGorry, 2007), with a 1-year prevalence of more than 4% by the end of adolescence (Thapar, Collishaw, Pine, & Thapar, 2012). Preventing depressive symptoms means not only less individual suffering but also fewer societal costs (Kessler, 2012). We are most likely to find adolescents at school, and therefore school may be a good place to implement intervention programs targeting depression (Carnevale, 2013). However, it is essential that the programs be effective not only in study settings but also when implemented in schools and conducted by the regular school staff. The RE-AIM framework is a model used for assessing the public health impact of an intervention (Glasgow, Vogt, & Boles, 1999). It was developed to overlap the gap between interventions found to be effective in study settings but that are difficult to implement effectively in the world of busy, often understaffed community settings. The emphasis on developing clinically significant outcomes has produced a lot of intensive, expensive interventions that are demanding for both students and staff. Low-intensity interventions that are less efficacious but reach a large population may have a more pervasive impact (Glasgow et al., 1999). Unfortunately, there is a serious lack of real-world evaluation of the school-based programs concerning behavioral and emotional issues (see Fact Box 1; O’Connell et al., 2009; The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment, 2010).


Evaluation of a school-based program aimed at preventing depressive symptoms in adolescents.

Garmy P, Jakobsson U, Carlsson KS, Berg A, Clausson EK - J Sch Nurs (2014)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390603&req=5

Mentions: Promoting well-being and preventing depressive symptoms in adolescence are important school health concerns. Depression in adolescence is a common health issue globally (Patel, Flisher, Hetrick, & McGorry, 2007), with a 1-year prevalence of more than 4% by the end of adolescence (Thapar, Collishaw, Pine, & Thapar, 2012). Preventing depressive symptoms means not only less individual suffering but also fewer societal costs (Kessler, 2012). We are most likely to find adolescents at school, and therefore school may be a good place to implement intervention programs targeting depression (Carnevale, 2013). However, it is essential that the programs be effective not only in study settings but also when implemented in schools and conducted by the regular school staff. The RE-AIM framework is a model used for assessing the public health impact of an intervention (Glasgow, Vogt, & Boles, 1999). It was developed to overlap the gap between interventions found to be effective in study settings but that are difficult to implement effectively in the world of busy, often understaffed community settings. The emphasis on developing clinically significant outcomes has produced a lot of intensive, expensive interventions that are demanding for both students and staff. Low-intensity interventions that are less efficacious but reach a large population may have a more pervasive impact (Glasgow et al., 1999). Unfortunately, there is a serious lack of real-world evaluation of the school-based programs concerning behavioral and emotional issues (see Fact Box 1; O’Connell et al., 2009; The Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment, 2010).

Bottom Line: The students, both females and males, rated their depressed symptoms as significantly lower after the course; and for the females, this was maintained 1-year postintervention.The implementation costs for the initial 2 years were about US$300 per student.Positive effects of a universal school-based cognitive behavioral intervention aiming at preventing depressive symptoms in adolescents were found, especially among females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden Center for Primary Health Care Research, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden pernilla.garmy@med.lu.se.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus