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The psychometric properties of the korean version of the verbal abuse questionnaire in university students.

Jeong B, Lee SW, Lee JS, Yoo JH, Kim KW, Cho S, Ahn JY, Choi J - Psychiatry Investig (2015)

Bottom Line: The K-VAQ was significantly associated with the LEC-K (r=0.24) and K-IES-R (r=0.28), indicating good convergent validity and concurrent validity.In a further investigation, a K-VAQ score of 40 was found to be the appropriate cutoff point to delineate the highly verbally abused group, as used in the previous studies.A sum of 36.5% of the highly verbally abused group reported to show substantial symptoms of PTSD (K-IES-R score >22).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Clinical Neuroscience and Development, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Korean Verbal Abuse Questionnaire (K-VAQ) that consists of 15 items related with life-time verbal aggression exposure.

Methods: A total of 5814 university students who agreed to take part in the study completed the K-VAQ, the Korean version of the Life Event CheckList (LEC-K) and Impact of Event Scale-Revised (K-IES-R). Internal consistency was checked by using item-total item correlation and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed, and convergent and concurrent validity levels were examined. Finally, a cluster analysis was conducted to verify the validity of the cutoff point of the K-VAQ.

Results: The Cronbach's alpha correlation coefficient was 0.9. The K-VAQ showed a single factor structure which explained 55.34% of the total variance. The K-VAQ was significantly associated with the LEC-K (r=0.24) and K-IES-R (r=0.28), indicating good convergent validity and concurrent validity. The cluster analysis provided four clusters of trauma experiences: high, moderate, low, and minimal, with K-VAQ ranges of 43-81, 20-42, 7-19, and 0-6, respectively. In a further investigation, a K-VAQ score of 40 was found to be the appropriate cutoff point to delineate the highly verbally abused group, as used in the previous studies. A sum of 36.5% of the highly verbally abused group reported to show substantial symptoms of PTSD (K-IES-R score >22).

Conclusion: The present findings suggest that the K-VAQ has good psychometric properties for assessing verbal aggression among the Korean population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sum-of-squares plot (A) and Korean version of the Verbal Abuse Questionnaire (K-VAQ) scores according to groups (B). All subjects were divided into four groups according to the bend point in the sum-of-squared error (SSE) plot (A). Every group has an adequate number of subjects and specific ranges of the K-VAQ score (B).
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Figure 1: Sum-of-squares plot (A) and Korean version of the Verbal Abuse Questionnaire (K-VAQ) scores according to groups (B). All subjects were divided into four groups according to the bend point in the sum-of-squared error (SSE) plot (A). Every group has an adequate number of subjects and specific ranges of the K-VAQ score (B).

Mentions: The subjects were divided into four groups according to the bend point in the SSE plot with an appropriate number of subjects in each group (Figure 1). We excluded four outliers who showed extremely high K-VAQ scores (90, 91 and two at 105) and arranged the subjects according to the severity of their trauma experiences. Finally, we categorized the subjects into four groups: high, moderate, low and minimal trauma experienced groups. Each group can be distinguished from one another by its range of the K-VAQ scores (high=43-81, moderate=20-42, low=7-19, and minimal=0-6) (Figure 1). Based on the results of the cluster analysis, we divided the subjects into four groups according to their K-VAQ scores, applying the previous cutoff score of 404,8,9 (highly=40 or above, moderately=20-39, low=7-19, minimally verbally abused=0-6). The trauma-related symptoms measured by the K-IES-R showed significant differences among the four different verbal-abuse groups [F(3, 5806)=123.03, p<0.001] (Figure 2). A large proportion (36.5%) of the highly verbally abused group reported K-IES-R scores that exceeded the cut-off point (K-IES-R score >22),17 while the moderately, low and minimally verbally abused groups showed a small number of the subjects with K-IES-R scores above the cut-off point (17.6%, 7.6% and 4.4%, respectively). These differences in the frequency were statistically significant in a chi-square test [χ2(3)=212.42, p<0.001]. Also, in a post-hoc analysis, the highly verbally abused group showed a higher PTSD symptoms than the moderately verbally abused group [χ2(1)= 12.16, p<0.001].


The psychometric properties of the korean version of the verbal abuse questionnaire in university students.

Jeong B, Lee SW, Lee JS, Yoo JH, Kim KW, Cho S, Ahn JY, Choi J - Psychiatry Investig (2015)

Sum-of-squares plot (A) and Korean version of the Verbal Abuse Questionnaire (K-VAQ) scores according to groups (B). All subjects were divided into four groups according to the bend point in the sum-of-squared error (SSE) plot (A). Every group has an adequate number of subjects and specific ranges of the K-VAQ score (B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390589&req=5

Figure 1: Sum-of-squares plot (A) and Korean version of the Verbal Abuse Questionnaire (K-VAQ) scores according to groups (B). All subjects were divided into four groups according to the bend point in the sum-of-squared error (SSE) plot (A). Every group has an adequate number of subjects and specific ranges of the K-VAQ score (B).
Mentions: The subjects were divided into four groups according to the bend point in the SSE plot with an appropriate number of subjects in each group (Figure 1). We excluded four outliers who showed extremely high K-VAQ scores (90, 91 and two at 105) and arranged the subjects according to the severity of their trauma experiences. Finally, we categorized the subjects into four groups: high, moderate, low and minimal trauma experienced groups. Each group can be distinguished from one another by its range of the K-VAQ scores (high=43-81, moderate=20-42, low=7-19, and minimal=0-6) (Figure 1). Based on the results of the cluster analysis, we divided the subjects into four groups according to their K-VAQ scores, applying the previous cutoff score of 404,8,9 (highly=40 or above, moderately=20-39, low=7-19, minimally verbally abused=0-6). The trauma-related symptoms measured by the K-IES-R showed significant differences among the four different verbal-abuse groups [F(3, 5806)=123.03, p<0.001] (Figure 2). A large proportion (36.5%) of the highly verbally abused group reported K-IES-R scores that exceeded the cut-off point (K-IES-R score >22),17 while the moderately, low and minimally verbally abused groups showed a small number of the subjects with K-IES-R scores above the cut-off point (17.6%, 7.6% and 4.4%, respectively). These differences in the frequency were statistically significant in a chi-square test [χ2(3)=212.42, p<0.001]. Also, in a post-hoc analysis, the highly verbally abused group showed a higher PTSD symptoms than the moderately verbally abused group [χ2(1)= 12.16, p<0.001].

Bottom Line: The K-VAQ was significantly associated with the LEC-K (r=0.24) and K-IES-R (r=0.28), indicating good convergent validity and concurrent validity.In a further investigation, a K-VAQ score of 40 was found to be the appropriate cutoff point to delineate the highly verbally abused group, as used in the previous studies.A sum of 36.5% of the highly verbally abused group reported to show substantial symptoms of PTSD (K-IES-R score >22).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Clinical Neuroscience and Development, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Korean Verbal Abuse Questionnaire (K-VAQ) that consists of 15 items related with life-time verbal aggression exposure.

Methods: A total of 5814 university students who agreed to take part in the study completed the K-VAQ, the Korean version of the Life Event CheckList (LEC-K) and Impact of Event Scale-Revised (K-IES-R). Internal consistency was checked by using item-total item correlation and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed, and convergent and concurrent validity levels were examined. Finally, a cluster analysis was conducted to verify the validity of the cutoff point of the K-VAQ.

Results: The Cronbach's alpha correlation coefficient was 0.9. The K-VAQ showed a single factor structure which explained 55.34% of the total variance. The K-VAQ was significantly associated with the LEC-K (r=0.24) and K-IES-R (r=0.28), indicating good convergent validity and concurrent validity. The cluster analysis provided four clusters of trauma experiences: high, moderate, low, and minimal, with K-VAQ ranges of 43-81, 20-42, 7-19, and 0-6, respectively. In a further investigation, a K-VAQ score of 40 was found to be the appropriate cutoff point to delineate the highly verbally abused group, as used in the previous studies. A sum of 36.5% of the highly verbally abused group reported to show substantial symptoms of PTSD (K-IES-R score >22).

Conclusion: The present findings suggest that the K-VAQ has good psychometric properties for assessing verbal aggression among the Korean population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus