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Heritable variation in courtship patterns in Drosophila melanogaster.

Gaertner BE, Ruedi EA, McCoy LJ, Moore JM, Wolfner MF, Mackay TF - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Bottom Line: We found heritable variation along the expected trajectory for courtship behaviors, including the tendency to initiate courtship and rate of progression through courtship, suggesting a genetic basis to male modulation of courtship behavior based on feedback from unrelated, outbred, and genetically identical females.We assessed the genetic basis of variation of the transition with the greatest heritability--from copulation to no engagement with the female--and identified variants in Serrate and Furin 1 as well as many other polymorphisms on the chromosome 3R associated with this transition.Our findings suggest that courtship is a highly dynamic behavior with both social and genetic inputs, and that males may play an important role in courtship initiation and duration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, W. M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology and Program in Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7614.

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Factor analysis of ethogram data corroborates overall courtship behavior. Each dot represents Factor 1 and Factor 2 scores for a line and is colored according to the average residual male mating progression score of that line after accounting for block effects. Lines with high average MMP scores (warm colors) tend to show low variation in transition matrices. They are distinguished from lines with middle MMP scores (light blues) along Factor 1 and from lines with low MMP scores (dark blues) along Factor 2.
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fig4: Factor analysis of ethogram data corroborates overall courtship behavior. Each dot represents Factor 1 and Factor 2 scores for a line and is colored according to the average residual male mating progression score of that line after accounting for block effects. Lines with high average MMP scores (warm colors) tend to show low variation in transition matrices. They are distinguished from lines with middle MMP scores (light blues) along Factor 1 and from lines with low MMP scores (dark blues) along Factor 2.

Mentions: We identified heritable variation in the courtship patterns of male D. melanogaster. To test whether discrete differences in transition probabilities might have a multivariate covariance structure, we performed a FA on the line means of each behavioral transition probability based on the significant eigenvectors in a principal component analysis (see the section Materials and Methods). Factor 1 explained 16.09% of the variance, and Factor 2 explained 12.87% of the variance in the transition matrices (Table 4). Both Factor 1 and Factor 2 load negatively with a copulation−copulation transition, and overall loading weights are uncorrelated between Factor 1 and Factor 2 (r = 0.13, P = 0.51). We compared these factors with the overall MMP score (Figure 4) and found that lines with high probabilities for copulation−copulation transitions (loading negatively on Factors 1 and 2) had the greatest MMP scores, which is internally consistent as these males are observed copulating the most. Factor 1 distinguishes these high MMP males from those with mid-range MMP scores, whereas Factor 2 distinguishes high MMP males from those with the lowest MMP scores. Thus, although there is little variation among lines with high copulation success, it appears that lines with low and moderate success are performing qualitatively different behaviors.


Heritable variation in courtship patterns in Drosophila melanogaster.

Gaertner BE, Ruedi EA, McCoy LJ, Moore JM, Wolfner MF, Mackay TF - G3 (Bethesda) (2015)

Factor analysis of ethogram data corroborates overall courtship behavior. Each dot represents Factor 1 and Factor 2 scores for a line and is colored according to the average residual male mating progression score of that line after accounting for block effects. Lines with high average MMP scores (warm colors) tend to show low variation in transition matrices. They are distinguished from lines with middle MMP scores (light blues) along Factor 1 and from lines with low MMP scores (dark blues) along Factor 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390569&req=5

fig4: Factor analysis of ethogram data corroborates overall courtship behavior. Each dot represents Factor 1 and Factor 2 scores for a line and is colored according to the average residual male mating progression score of that line after accounting for block effects. Lines with high average MMP scores (warm colors) tend to show low variation in transition matrices. They are distinguished from lines with middle MMP scores (light blues) along Factor 1 and from lines with low MMP scores (dark blues) along Factor 2.
Mentions: We identified heritable variation in the courtship patterns of male D. melanogaster. To test whether discrete differences in transition probabilities might have a multivariate covariance structure, we performed a FA on the line means of each behavioral transition probability based on the significant eigenvectors in a principal component analysis (see the section Materials and Methods). Factor 1 explained 16.09% of the variance, and Factor 2 explained 12.87% of the variance in the transition matrices (Table 4). Both Factor 1 and Factor 2 load negatively with a copulation−copulation transition, and overall loading weights are uncorrelated between Factor 1 and Factor 2 (r = 0.13, P = 0.51). We compared these factors with the overall MMP score (Figure 4) and found that lines with high probabilities for copulation−copulation transitions (loading negatively on Factors 1 and 2) had the greatest MMP scores, which is internally consistent as these males are observed copulating the most. Factor 1 distinguishes these high MMP males from those with mid-range MMP scores, whereas Factor 2 distinguishes high MMP males from those with the lowest MMP scores. Thus, although there is little variation among lines with high copulation success, it appears that lines with low and moderate success are performing qualitatively different behaviors.

Bottom Line: We found heritable variation along the expected trajectory for courtship behaviors, including the tendency to initiate courtship and rate of progression through courtship, suggesting a genetic basis to male modulation of courtship behavior based on feedback from unrelated, outbred, and genetically identical females.We assessed the genetic basis of variation of the transition with the greatest heritability--from copulation to no engagement with the female--and identified variants in Serrate and Furin 1 as well as many other polymorphisms on the chromosome 3R associated with this transition.Our findings suggest that courtship is a highly dynamic behavior with both social and genetic inputs, and that males may play an important role in courtship initiation and duration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, W. M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology and Program in Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7614.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus