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Differentiation of salivary bacterial profiles of subjects with periodontitis and dental caries.

Belstrøm D, Fiehn NE, Nielsen CH, Klepac-Ceraj V, Paster BJ, Twetman S, Holmstrup P - J Oral Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries have been demonstrated to differ from that of oral health.The aim of this comparative analysis of existing data generated by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) from 293 stimulated saliva samples was to compare bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Periodontology, Microbiology, and Community Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; dbel@sund.ku.dk.

ABSTRACT
Bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries have been demonstrated to differ from that of oral health. The aim of this comparative analysis of existing data generated by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) from 293 stimulated saliva samples was to compare bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Principal component analysis. Principal component analysis was used for exploration of mathematical patterns, as mean HOMIM values (level) from each probe, were used as parameters for investigation.
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Figure 0003: Principal component analysis. Principal component analysis was used for exploration of mathematical patterns, as mean HOMIM values (level) from each probe, were used as parameters for investigation.

Mentions: Targets of 12 probes (recognizing eight bacterial taxa and four bacterial clusters) were present significantly more often and at significantly higher levels (mean HOMIM value) in samples from periodontitis subjects (adjusted p-value<0.01) as compared to samples from subjects with dental caries. In contrast, Streptococcus salivarius was the only bacterial target detected significantly more often, and at significantly higher levels, in samples from subjects with dental caries (adjusted p-value<0.01) (Figs. 1 and 2). A separate analysis of samples from non-smoking subjects revealed that the same bacterial taxa and clusters were significantly associated with samples from the periodontitis group and dental caries group, as in the analysis comprising all subjects (data not shown). Data reduction through principal component analysis was performed to provide two-dimensional presentation of differences observed at taxon/cluster level, as mean HOMIM values of all probes identified were used as the end point to calculate the principal components of this n-dimensional data set. Based on the third most decisive component (component 3), accounting for 7.8% of the total variation of the data set, separation of samples from periodontitis and dental caries patients was evident (Fig. 3).


Differentiation of salivary bacterial profiles of subjects with periodontitis and dental caries.

Belstrøm D, Fiehn NE, Nielsen CH, Klepac-Ceraj V, Paster BJ, Twetman S, Holmstrup P - J Oral Microbiol (2015)

Principal component analysis. Principal component analysis was used for exploration of mathematical patterns, as mean HOMIM values (level) from each probe, were used as parameters for investigation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390560&req=5

Figure 0003: Principal component analysis. Principal component analysis was used for exploration of mathematical patterns, as mean HOMIM values (level) from each probe, were used as parameters for investigation.
Mentions: Targets of 12 probes (recognizing eight bacterial taxa and four bacterial clusters) were present significantly more often and at significantly higher levels (mean HOMIM value) in samples from periodontitis subjects (adjusted p-value<0.01) as compared to samples from subjects with dental caries. In contrast, Streptococcus salivarius was the only bacterial target detected significantly more often, and at significantly higher levels, in samples from subjects with dental caries (adjusted p-value<0.01) (Figs. 1 and 2). A separate analysis of samples from non-smoking subjects revealed that the same bacterial taxa and clusters were significantly associated with samples from the periodontitis group and dental caries group, as in the analysis comprising all subjects (data not shown). Data reduction through principal component analysis was performed to provide two-dimensional presentation of differences observed at taxon/cluster level, as mean HOMIM values of all probes identified were used as the end point to calculate the principal components of this n-dimensional data set. Based on the third most decisive component (component 3), accounting for 7.8% of the total variation of the data set, separation of samples from periodontitis and dental caries patients was evident (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries have been demonstrated to differ from that of oral health.The aim of this comparative analysis of existing data generated by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) from 293 stimulated saliva samples was to compare bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Periodontology, Microbiology, and Community Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; dbel@sund.ku.dk.

ABSTRACT
Bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries have been demonstrated to differ from that of oral health. The aim of this comparative analysis of existing data generated by the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) from 293 stimulated saliva samples was to compare bacterial profiles of saliva in subjects with periodontitis and dental caries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus