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Increased excitability of lateral habenula neurons in adolescent rats following cocaine self-administration.

Neumann PA, Ishikawa M, Otaka M, Huang YH, Schlüter OM, Dong Y - Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol. (2014)

Bottom Line: However, the mechanisms of this effect are poorly understood.We found two major relevant neuronal subtypes: burst firing neurons and regular spiking neurons.These results may help to explain how cocaine and other drugs negatively impact affect states.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Department (Drs Neumann, Ishikawa, Otaka, and Dong), and Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (Dr Huang); Molecular Neurobiology, European Neuroscience Institute, Göttingen, Germany (Dr Schlüter). pan23@pitt.edu yandong@pitt.edu.

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The self-administration protocol leads to cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Rats receiving cocaine nose-poked for more infusions than rats receiving saline. The graph shows the average number of infusions for rats in cocaine groups and saline groups across the 5 daily 2-hour self-administration training sessions. Data from short-term (ST), moderate-term (MT), and long-term (LT) withdrawal groups were combined (n of animals per treatment condition: saline ST, 6; MT, 4; LT, 3; total = 13; cocaine ST, 6; MT, 6; LT, 3; total = 15).
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Figure 1: The self-administration protocol leads to cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Rats receiving cocaine nose-poked for more infusions than rats receiving saline. The graph shows the average number of infusions for rats in cocaine groups and saline groups across the 5 daily 2-hour self-administration training sessions. Data from short-term (ST), moderate-term (MT), and long-term (LT) withdrawal groups were combined (n of animals per treatment condition: saline ST, 6; MT, 4; LT, 3; total = 13; cocaine ST, 6; MT, 6; LT, 3; total = 15).

Mentions: To test the effects of cocaine exposure on LHb neurons, a self-administration training model was used. Rats received 5-day self-administration training after an initial overnight training session. Rats were trained to nose-poke for 0.75 mg/kg infusions of cocaine/saline during 2-hour sessions. Animals in short-term (ST), moderate-term (MT), and long-term (LT) withdrawal groups received identical training and access to cocaine/saline. ANOVA was used to compare the number of rewards received across all treatment groups and training days, whereby reward infusions was the dependent variable and the training day and treatment group were fixed factors. As expected, comparisons between the ST, MT, and LT withdrawal groups for rats revealed no differences between reward infusions after a Bonferroni posttest (ST vs LT: saline, P = 1.00, n = 6, 3; cocaine, P = 1.00, n = 6, 3; ST vs MT: saline, P = 1.00, n = 6, 4; cocaine, P = 1.00, n = 6, 6; MT vs LT: saline, P = 1.00, n = 4, 3; cocaine, 1.00, n = 6, 3). Thus, the behavioral results were combined across withdrawal groups. Analysis comparing saline and cocaine treatment groups revealed that rats in combined cocaine treatment groups nose poked for more infusions than rats in the combined saline group (Figure 1; P < .0001, F[1, 139] = 562.64, n coc/sal = 15/13). The individual day of training had no effect (P = 0.69, F[4, 139] = 0.56, n coc/sal = 15/13), and no interaction effects were present across withdrawal groups or training days. These results confirm that this 5-day self-administration procedure is sufficient to both initiate and measure cocaine-seeking behavior in adolescent rats and that these rats demonstrate equivalent cocaine-seeking across withdrawal groups.


Increased excitability of lateral habenula neurons in adolescent rats following cocaine self-administration.

Neumann PA, Ishikawa M, Otaka M, Huang YH, Schlüter OM, Dong Y - Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol. (2014)

The self-administration protocol leads to cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Rats receiving cocaine nose-poked for more infusions than rats receiving saline. The graph shows the average number of infusions for rats in cocaine groups and saline groups across the 5 daily 2-hour self-administration training sessions. Data from short-term (ST), moderate-term (MT), and long-term (LT) withdrawal groups were combined (n of animals per treatment condition: saline ST, 6; MT, 4; LT, 3; total = 13; cocaine ST, 6; MT, 6; LT, 3; total = 15).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390528&req=5

Figure 1: The self-administration protocol leads to cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Rats receiving cocaine nose-poked for more infusions than rats receiving saline. The graph shows the average number of infusions for rats in cocaine groups and saline groups across the 5 daily 2-hour self-administration training sessions. Data from short-term (ST), moderate-term (MT), and long-term (LT) withdrawal groups were combined (n of animals per treatment condition: saline ST, 6; MT, 4; LT, 3; total = 13; cocaine ST, 6; MT, 6; LT, 3; total = 15).
Mentions: To test the effects of cocaine exposure on LHb neurons, a self-administration training model was used. Rats received 5-day self-administration training after an initial overnight training session. Rats were trained to nose-poke for 0.75 mg/kg infusions of cocaine/saline during 2-hour sessions. Animals in short-term (ST), moderate-term (MT), and long-term (LT) withdrawal groups received identical training and access to cocaine/saline. ANOVA was used to compare the number of rewards received across all treatment groups and training days, whereby reward infusions was the dependent variable and the training day and treatment group were fixed factors. As expected, comparisons between the ST, MT, and LT withdrawal groups for rats revealed no differences between reward infusions after a Bonferroni posttest (ST vs LT: saline, P = 1.00, n = 6, 3; cocaine, P = 1.00, n = 6, 3; ST vs MT: saline, P = 1.00, n = 6, 4; cocaine, P = 1.00, n = 6, 6; MT vs LT: saline, P = 1.00, n = 4, 3; cocaine, 1.00, n = 6, 3). Thus, the behavioral results were combined across withdrawal groups. Analysis comparing saline and cocaine treatment groups revealed that rats in combined cocaine treatment groups nose poked for more infusions than rats in the combined saline group (Figure 1; P < .0001, F[1, 139] = 562.64, n coc/sal = 15/13). The individual day of training had no effect (P = 0.69, F[4, 139] = 0.56, n coc/sal = 15/13), and no interaction effects were present across withdrawal groups or training days. These results confirm that this 5-day self-administration procedure is sufficient to both initiate and measure cocaine-seeking behavior in adolescent rats and that these rats demonstrate equivalent cocaine-seeking across withdrawal groups.

Bottom Line: However, the mechanisms of this effect are poorly understood.We found two major relevant neuronal subtypes: burst firing neurons and regular spiking neurons.These results may help to explain how cocaine and other drugs negatively impact affect states.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Department (Drs Neumann, Ishikawa, Otaka, and Dong), and Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (Dr Huang); Molecular Neurobiology, European Neuroscience Institute, Göttingen, Germany (Dr Schlüter). pan23@pitt.edu yandong@pitt.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus