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The long-term dynamics of Campylobacter colonizing a free-range broiler breeder flock: an observational study.

Colles FM, McCarthy ND, Bliss CM, Layton R, Maiden MC - Environ. Microbiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite being free range, no newly colonizing STs were detected over a 6-week period in autumn and a 10-week period in winter, towards the end of the study.There was limited evidence that those STs identified among broiler chicken flocks on the same farm site were likely to colonize the breeder flock earlier (R(2) 0.16, P 0.01).These results suggest that there is natural control of Campylobacter dynamics within a flock which could potentially be exploited in designing new intervention strategies, and that the two different species should perhaps be considered separately.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK.

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Campylobacter prevalence versus the number of STs newly identified among the broiler breeder flock.Dark shading = C. coli isolates, grey shading = C. jejuni isolates. *Just one ST, ST-51 was newly isolated from both flock types in the same week (week 32) in June.
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fig03: Campylobacter prevalence versus the number of STs newly identified among the broiler breeder flock.Dark shading = C. coli isolates, grey shading = C. jejuni isolates. *Just one ST, ST-51 was newly isolated from both flock types in the same week (week 32) in June.

Mentions: There was a succession of Campylobacter STs isolated from the broiler breeder flock, but they were not mutually exclusive, and they varied in duration of detection (Fig. 1). The length of time between which an ST was newly isolated from the flock increased towards the end of the study, with no STs newly detected during September 2004, December 2004, January 2005 or the first week in February 2005 (Fig. 3). There was no evidence that the overall prevalence of Campylobacter in the flock was associated with STs being newly isolated from the flock, when tested at the same time, 1, 2 or 3 weeks post identification, or if the initial bloom in prevalence prior to week 15 was removed from the analyses (R2 < 0.001 to 0.092, P 0.024–0.999).


The long-term dynamics of Campylobacter colonizing a free-range broiler breeder flock: an observational study.

Colles FM, McCarthy ND, Bliss CM, Layton R, Maiden MC - Environ. Microbiol. (2014)

Campylobacter prevalence versus the number of STs newly identified among the broiler breeder flock.Dark shading = C. coli isolates, grey shading = C. jejuni isolates. *Just one ST, ST-51 was newly isolated from both flock types in the same week (week 32) in June.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390391&req=5

fig03: Campylobacter prevalence versus the number of STs newly identified among the broiler breeder flock.Dark shading = C. coli isolates, grey shading = C. jejuni isolates. *Just one ST, ST-51 was newly isolated from both flock types in the same week (week 32) in June.
Mentions: There was a succession of Campylobacter STs isolated from the broiler breeder flock, but they were not mutually exclusive, and they varied in duration of detection (Fig. 1). The length of time between which an ST was newly isolated from the flock increased towards the end of the study, with no STs newly detected during September 2004, December 2004, January 2005 or the first week in February 2005 (Fig. 3). There was no evidence that the overall prevalence of Campylobacter in the flock was associated with STs being newly isolated from the flock, when tested at the same time, 1, 2 or 3 weeks post identification, or if the initial bloom in prevalence prior to week 15 was removed from the analyses (R2 < 0.001 to 0.092, P 0.024–0.999).

Bottom Line: Despite being free range, no newly colonizing STs were detected over a 6-week period in autumn and a 10-week period in winter, towards the end of the study.There was limited evidence that those STs identified among broiler chicken flocks on the same farm site were likely to colonize the breeder flock earlier (R(2) 0.16, P 0.01).These results suggest that there is natural control of Campylobacter dynamics within a flock which could potentially be exploited in designing new intervention strategies, and that the two different species should perhaps be considered separately.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK.

Show MeSH