Limits...
Expanding the species and chemical diversity of Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea.

Peterson SW, Jurjević Ž, Frisvad JC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Accordingly we use genealogical concordance analysis, a technique valid only in heterothallic organisms, for putatively asexual species.Seven new species were revealed in the analysis and are described here.These isolates could provide leads in pharmaceutical research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Mycology Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, Illinois, 61604, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A set of isolates very similar to or potentially conspecific with an unidentified Penicillium isolate NRRL 735, was assembled using a BLAST search of ITS similarity among described (GenBank) and undescribed Penicillium isolates in our laboratories. DNA was amplified from six loci of the assembled isolates and sequenced. Two species in section Cinnamopurpurea are self-compatible sexual species, but the asexual species had polymorphic loci suggestive of sexual reproduction and variation in conidium size suggestive of ploidy level differences typical of heterothallism. Accordingly we use genealogical concordance analysis, a technique valid only in heterothallic organisms, for putatively asexual species. Seven new species were revealed in the analysis and are described here. Extrolite analysis showed that two of the new species, P. colei and P. monsserratidens produce the mycotoxin citreoviridin that has demonstrated pharmacological activity against human lung tumors. These isolates could provide leads in pharmaceutical research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree based on ITS region sequences, with very similar sequences from GenBank.Unidentified endophytes from coffee plants in South America are P. fluviserpens; a cheese isolate from Europe, an apple core isolate from South Africa, and a fungal epiphyte from China are identified as P. cvjetkovicii although two were initially identified as P. chermesinum using phenotypic identification; and one sequence amplified from soil DNA represents an apparent unknown species. Bootstrap values above 70% are placed on the branches.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390383&req=5

pone.0121987.g002: Phylogenetic tree based on ITS region sequences, with very similar sequences from GenBank.Unidentified endophytes from coffee plants in South America are P. fluviserpens; a cheese isolate from Europe, an apple core isolate from South Africa, and a fungal epiphyte from China are identified as P. cvjetkovicii although two were initially identified as P. chermesinum using phenotypic identification; and one sequence amplified from soil DNA represents an apparent unknown species. Bootstrap values above 70% are placed on the branches.

Mentions: GenBank databases were searched prior to writing (accessed 12 July 2014) for additional isolates having sequences fitting with the newly described species. While all six loci were used for BLAST searches, the ITS region returned the most sequences and the most diverse sequences. Those sequences were downloaded, aligned with the study-group sequences and a tree was generated (Fig. 2; conditions as for ITS data above). Two unidentified endophytes from coffee plants in Colombia [39] were identified as P. fluviserpens. An isolate from an apple in South Africa [40], a cheese contaminant from Spain [41], both previously identified as P. chermesinum, and an unidentified decay mold of Ophiocordyceps sinensis in China [42] were all identified as P. cvjetkovicii. A sequence derived from an uncultured DNA clone from forest soil in Switzerland GB# KC818302 appears to represent an undescribed species from Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea.


Expanding the species and chemical diversity of Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea.

Peterson SW, Jurjević Ž, Frisvad JC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Phylogenetic tree based on ITS region sequences, with very similar sequences from GenBank.Unidentified endophytes from coffee plants in South America are P. fluviserpens; a cheese isolate from Europe, an apple core isolate from South Africa, and a fungal epiphyte from China are identified as P. cvjetkovicii although two were initially identified as P. chermesinum using phenotypic identification; and one sequence amplified from soil DNA represents an apparent unknown species. Bootstrap values above 70% are placed on the branches.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390383&req=5

pone.0121987.g002: Phylogenetic tree based on ITS region sequences, with very similar sequences from GenBank.Unidentified endophytes from coffee plants in South America are P. fluviserpens; a cheese isolate from Europe, an apple core isolate from South Africa, and a fungal epiphyte from China are identified as P. cvjetkovicii although two were initially identified as P. chermesinum using phenotypic identification; and one sequence amplified from soil DNA represents an apparent unknown species. Bootstrap values above 70% are placed on the branches.
Mentions: GenBank databases were searched prior to writing (accessed 12 July 2014) for additional isolates having sequences fitting with the newly described species. While all six loci were used for BLAST searches, the ITS region returned the most sequences and the most diverse sequences. Those sequences were downloaded, aligned with the study-group sequences and a tree was generated (Fig. 2; conditions as for ITS data above). Two unidentified endophytes from coffee plants in Colombia [39] were identified as P. fluviserpens. An isolate from an apple in South Africa [40], a cheese contaminant from Spain [41], both previously identified as P. chermesinum, and an unidentified decay mold of Ophiocordyceps sinensis in China [42] were all identified as P. cvjetkovicii. A sequence derived from an uncultured DNA clone from forest soil in Switzerland GB# KC818302 appears to represent an undescribed species from Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea.

Bottom Line: Accordingly we use genealogical concordance analysis, a technique valid only in heterothallic organisms, for putatively asexual species.Seven new species were revealed in the analysis and are described here.These isolates could provide leads in pharmaceutical research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Mycology Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, Illinois, 61604, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
A set of isolates very similar to or potentially conspecific with an unidentified Penicillium isolate NRRL 735, was assembled using a BLAST search of ITS similarity among described (GenBank) and undescribed Penicillium isolates in our laboratories. DNA was amplified from six loci of the assembled isolates and sequenced. Two species in section Cinnamopurpurea are self-compatible sexual species, but the asexual species had polymorphic loci suggestive of sexual reproduction and variation in conidium size suggestive of ploidy level differences typical of heterothallism. Accordingly we use genealogical concordance analysis, a technique valid only in heterothallic organisms, for putatively asexual species. Seven new species were revealed in the analysis and are described here. Extrolite analysis showed that two of the new species, P. colei and P. monsserratidens produce the mycotoxin citreoviridin that has demonstrated pharmacological activity against human lung tumors. These isolates could provide leads in pharmaceutical research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus